Today's News of 2017

Today's News


Millennial entrepreneur highlights Careers in Aging Week

Bloomsburg University’s Department of Psychology will host a career expo and presentation by millennial entrepreneur, Amanda Cavaleri, on Thursday, April 5, at 3:30 p.m and 6 p.m. to celebrate Careers in Aging Week. The department will host a career and community expo for students who are interested in working with older individuals and promoting healthy aging at 3:30 p.m. in the lobby of McCormick Center 2303.

Students will have the opportunity to meet and network with professionals currently in fields focused on meeting the needs of older individuals. Following the expo, Cavaleri will present to students about her company, Capable Living, and current project “Connect the Ages” at 6 p.m. in McCormick Center 2303.

Trustee LaRoy G. “Lee” Davis passes away

Former Bloomsburg University Council of Trustee member LaRoy G. “Lee” Davis, of Feasterville, passed away on Feb. 28. Lee was past member of the Council of Trustees serving for 37 years, being the longest-serving trustee in school history and the second longest serving trustee in the Pennsylvania System of Higher Education. He is survived by his beloved wife Hedy, one son, Glenn J. Davis and his wife Amy of Steamboat Springs, Co. and grandson Grayson Davis.

A memorial service will be held on Monday, March 19, at the Tomlinson Funeral Home, Bensalem. Receiving will take place from 10 to 11:30 a.m. with a memorial tribute at 11:30 a.m. A luncheon will follow at Bensalem Country Club, 2000 Brown Ave., Bensalem. In honor of Lee, please wear your Bloomsburg, Eagles, Phillies or golf attire or colors.

Born in Girardville, raised in Ashland, Schuylkill County he was a resident of Feasterville for 45 years. Lee was a teacher at Bensalem High School, retiring in 1999 after 33 years of service. He represented Bloomsburg proudly on the Pennsylvania Association of Council of Trustees. Appointed in 1979, by Gov. Richard Thornburgh, he served every succeeding governor including Gov. Tom Wolf. Lee was awarded two Fulbright-Hays Scholarships to study abroad; India, 1971 and Egypt, 1974.

He earned his Master of Arts Degree in Economics and Sociology, College of New Jersey in Trenton in 1972 and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Comprehensive Social Sciences from Bloomsburg University in 1967. He’s a past member of the Pennsylvania Social Studies Council and World Affairs Council; former member of the National Education Association; a leader within the Pennsylvania State Education Association and the Bensalem Township Education Association where he served as president and vice president.

Lee was a former legislative aide and educational advisor in the 6th State Senate District for former State Senator H. Craig Lewis (D) and a former legislative aide in the 18th House of Representative District for former house member Edward Burns (R). His advocacy for educational improvements was an important part of his life as a teacher, a university trustee and working with various elected political officials.

NatCon experience sets BUSVA up for more success

p>Bloomsburg University’s Student Veterans Association (BUSVA) may see some new twists this year thanks to the recent Student Veteran Association (SVA) National Conference in San Antonio.

A group of BUSVA members attended the SVA’s National Conference prior to the spring semester to be among the largest annual gathering of student veterans, advocates, leaders, stakeholders and supporters in higher education in the world. They came away with a lot of new ideas to bring back to campus, according to Raul Santana, president of BUSVA.

“As a member of the National Guard, I was pleased to learn from those who paved the way for me to follow as a soldier,” Santana said. “Veterans who were able to display their different perspectives and ideas from their SVA chapters throughout the nation helped me bring back a vast amount of ideas and new tactics I plan to use on BUSVA and that I believe will lead our organization to do even better.”

This was the first time Santana had the chance to not only organize the event with his peers but also attend the conference. According to Santana, everyone was able to explore, learn and most importantly cooperate with the purpose of professional development in mind.

The group learned from different experiences coming from several different organizations that were very welcoming of military experiences, he said.

“I was very happy to be able to call myself a contributor of an organization that is doing its best to help those who have served succeed,” Santana said. “Many of us obtained internship opportunities, job offers and even life-changing advice that I hope to offer anyone else who is interested.”

Santana said BUSVA not only want to calls out to student veterans but also to those who support the armed forces and want to contribute to the growth of the military presence on campus.

BUSVA’s trip to NatCon was made possible by a Professional Experience Grant, courtesy of the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience.

Chi Sigma Rho helps Ronald McDonald House's ‘Wish List’

Thousands of families of ill children stay at the Danville Ronald McDonald House each year, creating a need for basic household supplies to help them through a stressful and challenging time. It’s a cause Bloomsburg University’s Chi Sigma Rho sorority has been passionate about and supportive of over the years, including once again to kick off the spring semester.

A key to the success of the sorority’s effort are the additional donations it receives from campus and local Bloomsburg community, according to Marisa Russo, Chi Sigma Rho’s chapter philanthropy chair.

“Items like these are the reason the Ronald McDonald House is still there,” Russo said. “Families pay little to nothing in order to stay there, and these supplies are for families going through a rough time.”

Her and her co-chair researched the Ronald McDonald House website and found their “Wish List” to see what the house needs in order to stay open to families. Russo said she called the Danville Ronald McDonald House, and the fundraiser took off from there.

Chi Sigma Rho will be taking donation through the weekend at their house, 425 East Street, Bloomsburg. Items can be left on the front porch at any time during the day, or by knocking on the door for a sister to come and retrieve them. BU students can receive one community service hour per donated item, according to Russo, adding students need to make sure to fill out a piece of paper with their name, student ID number, represented organization (if applicable) and how items were donated.

Suggest items include:

  • deodorant
  • disposable coffee cups
  • juice boxes
  • shaving cream
  • plastic silverware
  • paper towels
  • zip lock bags
  • laundry detergent
  • feminine products

The Danville Ronald McDonald House provides a “home-away-from-home” for families of children who are hospitalized or receiving outpatient care at area hospitals, including Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital. The facility provides a warm and comforting environment, giving families an opportunity to relax, spend time with each other and find support through meeting others who share similar struggles.

LCCC and BU sign nursing program agreement

Luzerne County Community College and Bloomsburg University have entered into a new agreement which will help LCCC nursing graduates transfer from the community college to Bloomsburg University to complete their bachelor’s degree.

The Guaranteed Admissions Agreement is designed to facilitate the transfer of LCCC nursing graduates from The Mary Gill Carrozza, R.N. School of Nursing and Health Sciences to the BU online nursing program. LCCC graduates will be guaranteed admission into BU’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) online degree program with third year (junior) status.

In order to take advantage of the program-to-program agreement, students must graduate from LCCC with an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree in nursing with a minimum grade point average of 2.0. LCCC nursing graduates are also required to successfully pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX) prior to beginning courses at BU. The application fee to Bloomsburg will be waived.

“We’re pleased to continue our valuable partnership with Bloomsburg University, which has consistently ranked among the most popular choices for our students to continue their education,” says Thomas P. Leary, president, LCCC. “The College has many nursing graduates who are employed in the region and this cooperative agreement allows them to continue their education online and obtain a bachelor’s degree while working in their field.”

“This is another fine example of the strong, collaborative efforts BU maintains with its significant community college partners in Pennsylvania, with the ultimate goal of student success,” says Dr. Bashar Hanna, president, Bloomsburg University.

For more information about the new partnership, contact Jim Domzalski, director of enrollment management at LCCC at jdomzalski@luzerne.edu or Tom Fletcher, vice president of enrollment management at BU at tfletche@bloomu.edu.

Acclaimed author, Pulitzer finalist headlines MLK celebration

Wil Haygood, acclaimed biographer, Pulitzer finalist, award-winning author and reporter will speak at Bloomsburg University’s 25th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Celebration on Monday, Feb. 5 at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall’s Gross Auditorium.

Haygood is the author of seven books including the New York Times bestsellers Showdown: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court Nomination that Changed America and The Butler: A Witness to History. His writing has chronicled America’s civil rights journey through the lives and times of Thurgood Marshall, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Sammy Davis, Jr., Sugar Ray Robinson and Eugene Allen, the real-life inspiration for Lee Daniels’ internationally acclaimed film, The Butler.

Haygood was a long-time national and foreign correspondent for the Washington Post and Boston Globe, covering events such as Nelson Mandela’s release from prison after 27 years, the ascent of President Obama, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, and his own experience as the hostage of Somali rebels. While at the Globe, he was honored as a Pulitzer Prize finalist. A storyteller for our times, Haygood has earned high praise for connecting the civil rights movement and its iconic heroes with current events and enduring struggles.

BU's Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Celebration, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Multicultural Center and the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

Tri Sigma lends helping hand to NYC homeless

Before heading home for the holidays, a group of Sigma Sigma Sigma sisters made a quick pit stop in New York City to hand out some holiday cheer.

It was the second time the sorority coordinated their own Take My Hand project where they handed out donated items such as food, toiletries and gloves to the homeless. This year they were joined by a few fellow Greek Life volunteers.

“They (homeless) are so thankful people are out there who actually care and are trying to do something to help,” said Lena Kabak, a senior Tri Sigma sister who launched the Take My Hand initiative last year. “Even if it’s nothing big, we are trying to do something. The smiles were endless. From every person sitting on the street who had their head down with their cardboard sign, I can assure you they picked their head up and smiled after receiving some of the items from us.”

This year’s effort was aided by the generosity of Tri Sigma sister Jess Murray’s father, who provided free transportation into the city. As a result, Kabak said, all of the monetary donations went back into the project for McDonald’s gift card and food.

Kabak added Tri Sigma collected care packages from their alumni, which included toiletries and protein bars. Jackets, socks, gloves, scarves and hats were other popular donated items from organizations.

“Luckily the weather was warmer than last year, so more people were outside rather than in Penn Station,” Kabak said. “We got off of the bus and made our way down to Penn Station where we were able to hand out a lot of food and warm clothes to people. We also walked around Madison Square Garden and several side streets, where we were able to help out a lot of kind people.”

According to Kabak, the group hit most of the same areas as last year.

“Next year, hopefully we can organize a different route and get in contact with people who can better direct us to where more homeless people like to hang out,” Kabak said. “After encountering some of these kind people and seeing how hard they are struggling day by day, it honestly makes you want to break down and cry. Although, we were able to give them some food, and a warm coat or blanket, we went back to our homes later that day and they remained on the streets.”

In the future, Kabak says she hopes to have even more sisters and fellow Huskies get involved.

“There is so much that you can do with this event, and I hope when I graduate I’m able to plan it all out,” Kabak said. “This is something I most definitely will continue after I graduate. I want to eventually make this into a non-profit business that can impact a bigger population of the homeless in cities around the country.”

Second Chance Pell highlighted in national publication

Bloomsburg University’s participation in the U.S. Department of Education pilot program offering Pell grants to incarcerated students was recently featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Writer Kelly Field looked at the program that aims to reduce the rate of recidivism.

Second Chance Pell enrolls about 7,000 prisoners across the country. BU enrolls 25 Pell-eligible students in the program which is now in its third semester focusing on the State Correctional Institution-Muncy and State Correctional Institution-Mahanoy. Most participating prisoners are scheduled for release within the next five years.

“This initiative has the potential to change the trajectory for the life of numerous inmates and their families and communities,” said Pennsylvania’s Secretary of Corrections John Wetzel when the program was announced in June 2016. Wetzel graduated from BU in 1998 and serves on its Council of Trustees.

The federal Pell Grant Program provides need-based grants to low-income students to promote access to post-secondary education. Unlike a loan, a Pell grant does not require repayment. The Second Chance Pell program is estimated to comprise less than one-tenth of 1 percent of total Pell spending.

New international business major begins

A new international business major for Bloomsburg University's Zeigler College of Business has been approved by the Board of Governors of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education.

The major, which begins this fall, is designed to prepare students with a wider set of skills and a global mindset. Graduates will be prepared to step into leadership positions in profit, nonprofit and government organizations that operate across national boundaries. It combines liberal arts learning with the functional business disciplines, experiential learning and leadership training.

“We created an international business major that has a strong liberal arts foundation, study abroad, foreign language and international business courses. That is essentially how other universities structure their international business majors,” said Jeffrey Krug, dean of the Zeigler College of Business. “We also did something different; we added a requirement that every student accumulates up to 21 credits in a functional area of business such as accounting, finance, marketing, management, information technology and supply chain management."

Krug added, "We also collaborated with the College of Liberal Arts to create specializations in economics in the department of economics and policy and globalization in the department of political science. These specializations will serve students who may want to work in a nonprofit, government or international agency.”

The unique structure of the international business major, which requires coursework both in international business and a functional area of business, will increase the job marketability of graduates.

“A graduate will be able to tell a recruiter that he or she completed a major in international business with a functional concentration in accounting, finance or marketing," Krug said. "Almost all organizations today conduct transactions across national boundaries. Even small companies, for example, buy raw materials abroad to lower prices or sell products internationally to increase sales.”

“I’m aware of only two other universities in the country that offer this type of degree, the University of South Carolina and University of Southern California,” said Krug. “This is a unique opportunity to give students an international business degree that will propel Bloomsburg University in tremendous ways.”

Pi Sigma Epsilon receives national charter

This fall, Bloomsburg University became one of only 60 universities with a nationally recognized Pi Sigma Epsilon student chapter.

PSE, founded in 1952, is a professional fraternity for students in sales, marketing and management. Marcie Liebert, membership manager and chapter consultant from Pi Sigma Epsilon National Headquarters in Wisconsin visited campus at the end of fall semester to conduct the fraternity’s initiation. The new chapter’s president is Rachel Allen, a senior business administration marketing major with a concentration in professional selling.

PSE gives its members the chance to gain hands-on experience through experiential learning opportunities, participate in conferences both regionally and nationally, and network with professionals through PSE’s corporate partner program. Through PSE students will develop practical sales and marketing skills through active involvement in:

  • sales and marketing projects
  • marketing research
  • professional programs
  • community service
  • social events
  • awards competition
  • general chapter operations

Students will also have an opportunity to attend a fall PSE conference and national convention each full of business development seminars and workshops, along with networking opportunities with professional and collegiate members.

In addition, PSE annually offers more than $60,000 in scholarship awards through more than 25 different categories for student chapters to compete in. PSE also offers opportunities for students to participate in annual Pro-Am Sell-A-Thon, a national speaking competition and leadership training.

Student-inspired holiday card tradition begins

In what is hoped will become an annual tradition, Bloomsburg University’s department of art and art history had a student produce a holiday card in the school’s printmaking studio under the guidance of professor Chad Andrews. The featured artwork on this year’s holiday card titled “Poinsettia Head” was created by Rowan Shaffer.

Rowan is from Carlisle and graduated from West Perry High School in 2014. She studied two years at Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC) before transferring to Bloomsburg University in 2016 as an art studio major. Her current studies include printmaking and fiber arts. Rowan’s art has been exhibited at The Gallery at Greenly Center in Bloomsburg; the Gmeiner Art and Cultural Center in Wellsboro, Pa.; the Harvey Andruss Library at Bloomsburg University; and the Schulman Gallery at Luzerne County Community College in Nanticoke, Pa.

The three-color image for this card was designed, drawn (including the color separations), and silkscreen printed by the artist’s hand in the printmaking studio in Old Science Hall at Bloomsburg University.

Shaffer, who hopes to open her own studio one day, said the design process began last spring.

“The design is actually a reworking of a piece I printed last spring during my silkscreen class. My imagery revolves mostly around the relationship between humans and nature, and I use lots of flower iconography and imagery in most of my prints. I started the Fall 2017 semester off with reworking this piece, and quickly became obsessed with the way things were going. When Chad approached me with this project, I decided to continue with this imagery but adapt it to fit the project’s needs.”

The artist signed an edition of 50 cards that are part of 200 prints that were made for Bloomsburg University.

BU holds fall Commencement Ceremonies

More than 400 students will earn degrees from Bloomsburg University at the fall commencement ceremonies Friday and Saturday, Dec. 15 and 16, in Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall.

On Friday, 54 graduate students will receive their master’s or doctoral degrees during a 6 p.m. ceremony. Saturday, 167 students will receive their diplomas from the College of Education and College of Liberal Arts during a ceremony at 10 a.m., and 181 students will graduate from the Zeigler College of Business and the College of Science and Technology in a 2:30 p.m. ceremony.

Top honor graduates

Students who earned the highest grade point average in their college are recognized during both ceremonies. The top students are:

  • College of Liberal Arts — Brandon C. Toter, Kulpmont, criminal justice
  • College of Education — Ariel M. Harro, Shickshinny, early childhood education PK-4
  • Zeigler College of Business — Emily M. Baker, New Columbia, accounting and finance
  • College of Science and Technology — Krystan J. Mackert, Berwick, exercise science

Traditionally, BU faculty deliver the commencement address at the fall ceremonies. Janet Bodenman, professor of communication studies, will speak at the morning ceremony, and Karl Kapp, professor of instructional technology, will deliver the afternoon address. All ceremonies will be streamed live online.

‘Tis the season of giving

Justine Fox, a graduate assistant for the Center for Leadership and Engagement, has been leading an annual service project that is having a hand in helping children within the local community receive gifts for the holidays who might not get them otherwise.

Beginning in October, the CLE staff reaches out to schools in the area where up to twenty students are able to receive gifts from the Bloomsburg University community. This year nine schools provided the CLE office with names and wish lists of underprivileged children to receive gifts this holiday season. Each child’s wish list is written on an ornament and distributed on campus by student volunteers.

“Compared to where I did my undergraduate, Bloomsburg is much more engaged with the community, which is why I think projects, such as The Giving Tree are so successful,” Fox said. “I think students, faculty, staff and even town members know how much the holidays wouldn’t be the same without presents, so they embrace this project knowing it's helping underprivileged children.”

KAΨ caps fall with successful Unity Jam

Kappa Alpha Psi’s Unity Jam isn’t your average party. The annual fraternity event combines fun and fellowship into community service.

Instead of a typical admission fee, KAΨ asks partygoers to donate two canned goods to enter the event. By the end of this fall’s Unity Jam, the fraternity had more 200 canned goods to donate the Bloomsburg food cupboard.

This event gives the students an opportunity to enjoy themselves and play a significant role in giving back to the community, according to Corey Webb, fraternity brother.

“Community service is an important part in college,” Webb said. “More importantly, we want to affect the community we are in and leave a positive mark.”

Unity Jam is just one of several community service events KAΨ has hosts throughout the school year. It held “Kappa Kickback” last spring inviting fellow students to decorate shoeboxes. KAΨ filled these shoeboxes with toiletries for the Bloomsburg Women’s Center.

“My favorite part is simply being able to genuinely give back with my brothers,” Webb said. “It feels good to give back to the less fortunate and help the community when we have the opportunity.”

Breast Cancer Walk raises nearly $10,000

With more than 300 participants, Bloomsburg University’s annual Breast Cancer Walk had another successful effort this fall raising nearly $10,000 to benefit the PA Breast Cancer Coalition.

New this year was its evening schedule, turning the popular campus fundraiser into a “glow walk.” Madelyn Rodriguez, the director for the office of Multicultural Affairs, has organized the event for the past 15 years raising thousands of dollars for the coalition.

“PA Breast Cancer Coalition (PBCC) represents, supports and serves breast cancer survivors and their families in Pennsylvania through educational programming, legislative advocacy and breast cancer research grants,” Rodriguez aid. “The PBCC is a statewide nonprofit organization that creates the hope of a brighter tomorrow by providing action and information to women with breast cancer today.”

Rodriguez added the PA Breast Cancer Coalition is the source of action and information for women in this state with breast cancer. Through its statewide outreach and education programs, its legislative victories, and its vast patient resources, the coalition is a ‘one stop shopping’ for both the newly-diagnosed and the long-term survivor.

There were many participants at the glow walk. One of them being Katrina Eicholtz, who participated with Alpha Phi Omega, which raised the most money for breast cancer research.

“APO is founded on leadership, friendship, and service,” Eicholtz said. “The Breast Cancer Walk helps to sponsor life-saving medical research for those who have faced one of life’s hardest diagnoses. It makes perfect sense for our organization to be involved.”

According to Eicholtz, Alpha Phi Omega had a wonderful time and will for sure be participating again the upcoming year.

Walk the Walk, Talk the Talk

Several Bloomsburg University organizations and students capped Trans Awareness Month by joining together on campus to stand up against sexual and gender based violence. Walk the Walk, Talk the Talk provided opportunities for participants to learn, develop and practice intervention strategies when encountered with many forms of sexual or gender based violence.

“We included this event as part of Trans Awareness Month, because sexual assault disproportionately affects the Trans community — especially Trans women of color — and we wanted to make sure the program was inclusive of all gender identities,” said Malik Muhammad, coordinator of the LGBTQA Resource Center and Sexual and Gender Diversity.

Christiana Paradis, of the Women’s Center in town, inspired the idea of this event. Paradis introduced Walk the Walk, Talk the Talk in order to provide an opportunity to march for visibility and awareness, while at the same time educating folks on how to be an active bystander. The event was co-sponsored by the LGBTQA Resource Center and the BU Women’s Resource Center.

In addition, the Office of Gender Studies, Huskies baseball team, Student Athlete Advisory Committee, Delta Phi Epsilon, and the BU Equality Alliance pledged in support of ending sexual and gender based violence both on campus and in their everyday lives. Each group made a banner, joined the campus march and attended the bystander intervention program.

Holiday Food Drive celebrates 30 years

Bloomsburg University’s annual Holiday Food Drive continued its long-standing campus tradition in recent weeks collecting donations for local food cupboards. This year’s campaign was extra special. Organizers celebrated 30 years of success in supporting local needy families and food banks

"From the start of the food drive until 2015, we were donating to anywhere from 16 to 30 families with small amounts to the area food panties," said Audra Halye, fiscal technician at BU and among the key food drive organizers since 1995. "For a few years we also supported 10 senior citizens thru the Area on Aging and provided toys for the kids, donated by Toys for Tots and various individuals and departments on campus."

Food donations from this year designated for AGAPE, the Bloomsburg, Catawissa and Orangeville food cupboards have included cereal, pasta, spaghetti sauce, macaroni and cheese, boxed meals, rice, peanut butter, jelly, canned and processed fruit, soup and vegetables, pudding, Jell-O, cake, brownie and cookie mixes and frosting.

"We wrap boxes to put in all the buildings, collected family information from employees and organized and prepared labels for family size on box for sorting and drivers to deliver boxes by family," Hayle said. "As toys were donated based on child's age and gender, they were wrapped and labeled for the family and child. Teenagers received a movie theater gift card."

Hayle said food was collected, unboxed and sorted by type of item as in a grocery store.

Items were then divided and boxed based on family size," Hayle said. "Someone went to the grocery store and bought a turkey and in later years that changed to a canned ham for each family. Grocery gift cards were also provided to each family. New signs were put on boxes for the families. Drivers to deliver the boxes to families had to be contacted and pick up times assigned. Someone had to be available for drivers to pick up boxes for delivery. Leftover items were donated to Bloomsburg Food Pantry and AGAPE. All of that took a lot of volunteers, space money and time."

According to Halye, last year the committee decided to donate all food to the area food pantries.

"Several area pantries were struggling to meet the growing need of area families," Halye said. "Two large pallets piled high with boxes of food was collected, as well as monetary donations. One pallet each was provided to AGAPE and the Bloomsburg Food Cupboard. Catawissa and Orangeville food cupboards received a check for $250 each. I received a call from one of the food pantries in November asking if they could count on us this year. They are providing for more families each year and need our help."

Holiday Food Drive 2017

There was enough food donated to fill 17 boxes, five for Catawissa food pantry, six each for Bloomsburg Food Pantry and AGAPE. Orangeville Food Pantry received a check for $200. "Thank you to everyone who donated food, money or their time to make this another successful food drive," Hayle said.

Legacy of Leadership Awards

Students and advisors involved on campus have the opportunity to be recognized for their outstanding work and overall dedication to Bloomsburg University and the local community.

Outstanding Student Mentor Award

This is awarded to an outstanding student leader who has assumed the role of mentor for a fellow student or group of students. Any student leader who has been a mentor to someone else on campus is considered for this award. The Outstanding Student Mentor Award will be given to a student who has gone above and beyond to serve as a mentor and role model during the year of 2017 (January – December).

To be considered for the Outstanding Student Mentor Award, nominators and/or applicants should submit a one to two page double spaced 12 font typed description of the nominee or applicant as related to the above criteria for the award.

Student Organization of the Year Award

This is awarded to an active, recognized student organization that has demonstrated outstanding leadership qualities, displayed thorough involvement in campus events, leadership development, organizational programming, and/or service. $500 award. Any active, recognized student club/organization that has demonstrated outstanding leadership qualities during the year of 2017 (January – December) can qualify for the Student Organization of the Year Award. Such qualities may have been displayed through involvement in campus events, leadership development, organizational programming, and/or service.

To be considered for the Organization of the Year Award nominators and/or applicants should submit a one to two page double spaced 12 font typed description of the nominee or applicant as related to the above criteria for the award.

Student Organization Advisor of the Year

The Student Organization Advisor of the Year Award will be given to an advisor who has served a recognized BU student club/organization above and beyond expectations during the year of 2017 (January-December). *Only student nominations will be accepted for this award.

To be considered for the Organization Advisor of the Year Award nominators and/or applicants should submit a one to two page double spaced 12 font typed description of the nominee or applicant as related to the above criteria for the award.

H. Preston Herring Leadership Scholarship

Those who are eligible for this scholarship are current undergraduate sophomores and juniors, in good standing, who exhibit some of Dr. H. Preston Herring’s most admirable leadership qualities—service, modesty, and commitment. Students nominated for this award would have demonstrated leadership and service to the town of Bloomsburg and the university community through volunteering, community employment and active participation in on-campus organizations. Nominees/applicants should demonstrate character, developmental growth while attending BU, and perhaps even have overcome adversity as they persevere in their educational pursuits.

To be considered for the Dr. H. Preston Herring scholarship nominators and/or applicants should submit a one to two page double spaced 12 font typed description of the nominee or applicant as related to the following criteria for awarding of the scholarship.

“Receiving the Dr. H. Preston Herring memorial scholarship was not only helpful from a financial aspect but it also drove me to continue to work hard in and out of the classroom. It seemed the more I learned about Dr. Herring the more humbled I was by the gift from his family and the more focused I was on living up to being its recipient,” — Eric Schwartz, H. Preston Herring Scholarship Recipient.

2018 Student Leadership Awards and Scholarship

The following awards are nomination based and will be presented at the Legacy of Leadership banquet:

  • Dr. H. Preston Herring Scholarship
  • Student Organization of the Year
  • Student Organization Advisor of the Year
  • Outstanding Student Mentor

Please submit your nomination by Friday, Dec. 15.

BU hosts professional school counselors meeting

More than 70 professional school counselors converged on Bloomsburg University this fall for the annual Susquehanna Valley School Counselors Association meeting, which included more than 20 students from BU’s Master of Education in Educational Leadership (M.Ed.) program.

Chris Long, president of SVSCA, led the daylong program that featured a wide variety of topics, training, and group discussions focusing on “expanding the image and influence of professional school counselors, promoting professional and ethical practice, and advocating for equity and access for all students.” Such topics included Mental Health First Aid and 339 Comprehensive training by a team from PA's Bureau of Career and Technical Education.

In addition, several BU faculty and staff members had the opportunity to participate, including Tim Knoster, executive director of the McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support. Knoster provided insight on the work and training that is available within the region, specifically being trained systematically to provide support to students.

Ray Pastore, professor of teaching and learning, was also a featured presenter. He prepared students in the Introduction to School Counseling class for discussions and exposure to key topics in school counseling.

Mike Thompson, of the SVSCA, led the team of career consultants who trained on building community support and engaging stakeholders in a comprehensive school counseling plan. Teams of school counselors have completed plans and are sustaining the plans with ongoing collaboration with all stakeholders.

Campus rallies for holiday card campaign

A simple Facebook connection has led to an inspiring holiday card campaign at Bloomsburg University to lift up the spirits of a 3-year-old girl battling leukemia at Geisinger Janet Weis Children’s Hospital in Danville.

Eliza Parson was simply sharing her appreciation on Facebook for the success of her toy drive last month for Matthew’s Wish that collected nearly 400 toys. The video resonated with one of Parson’s friends, who happens to be a family friend of Talynn.

“She told me how Talynn was having a really hard time in the hospital right now, especially since it’s around the holidays,” said Parson, a junior social work major. “I went to the store the next day and bought a ton of construction paper, markers, and stickers to make cards for her. I picked up some gifts as well and wrapped them, so she would have something to open (for Christmas).”

Parson’s campaign didn’t end there. She quickly recruited friends and classmates to join the cause.

“Bloomsburg University students were amazing during my toy drive and contributed tremendously, so I knew many would be willing to help put a smile on Talynn’s face by making a card,” Parson said, “I chose card making, because I knew money is tight for college students and most are gearing up for finals right now. I asked (Talynn’s) mom if cards would cheer her up, and she said she would love that.”

According to Parson, she will be soon delivering the first round of cards to Talynn and is prepared to make a second trip if more cards are made. Talynn loves horses, and her favorite colors are pink, blue and purple, Parson added.

Contact Parson at ejp22522@huskies.bloomu.edu for more information, including setting up an opportunity to get supplies and pick up cards for her to deliver to Talynn in Danville.

Greenly Scholar Award established

A new endowed gift from Bloomsburg University Foundation board member Duane Greenly ’72 and his wife Sue Greenly ’72 will support experiential learning opportunities for students in the College of Science and Technology.

The $575,000 gift will provide Professional Experience Grants (PEGs) to help fund outside-the-classroom opportunities for students to work together with faculty members on research collaborations. The gift is consistent with the university’s Professional U focus, which is to provide high-impact practices, integrating their academic experience with professional experience in “real world” settings.

Duane Greenly, who served as chair of the Bloomsburg University’s recently concluded It’s Personal campaign, BU’s largest-ever capital campaign, and his wife Sue both graduated from Bloomsburg in 1972. Duane completed his undergraduate studies with a degree in chemistry and Sue in special education. Their combined educational backgrounds along with extensive conversations with members of BU’s College of Science and Technology, helped the Greenly’s to identify an area of need at the university that they were excited about supporting through the creation of multiple PEGs.

“The commitment we made to support the university throughout the It’s Personal campaign was important to us because our gift was very personal,” Greenly said. “We thought for a long time about how we could take this next step with our support to help in sustaining one of the priorities established during the campaign, which was to find a way to create more hands-on experiences for BU students.”

The Greenly’s history of support for BU extends back to 1991 with their first gift to the Henry Carver Fund, Bloomsburg University’s Annual Fund and includes significant contributions, including the establishment of the Greenly Center in downtown Bloomsburg along with the Duane and Sue Greenly Scholarship.

“Sue and Duane’s continued support and their recognition of the importance of experiential learning as an integral part of a Bloomsburg University education is truly inspiring,” said BU President Bashar W. Hanna. “This extraordinary gift will expand experiential learning opportunities for our science and technology students ensuring success in their chosen discipline after graduation.”

Since the It’s Personal campaign began in 2010, a total of 11 PEGs were established to support majors in the Zeigler College of Business, College of Education and College of Liberal Arts, but the university had faced a challenge in funding professional research experiences for students in the College of Science and Technology.

Thanks to the Greenlys’ gift, seven students in the areas of biological sciences, chemistry and biochemistry, biological and allied health, and environmental, geographical and geological sciences have already applied and were awarded the PEGs, which will allow them to begin conducting independent research studies under the supervision of faculty members.

“Research is by far the most robust, effective and high-impact experiential learning activity for our students,” said Dean of the College of Science and Technology Robert Aronstam. “This is truly one of the most significant gifts we could receive, and will fund what the faculty has identified as the greatest need of the college; helping us to reach our goal of providing one outside-the-classroom research opportunity for each of our students before graduation.”

NSSE seeks opinions of students

Members of Bloomsburg University’s first‐year and senior classes are invited to share opinions about their experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE).

The survey reveals students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results are used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey will automatically be entered into a random drawing to win one of 85 prizes: one $150 Amazon gift card, one $100 Amazon gift card, one of nine $50 Amazon gift cards, one of four $25 Amazon gift cards, one of 12 BU drawstring bags, one of 10 BU iPod armband holders, one of 25 BU spirit flags, one of 20 BU smartphone power banks, or one of three BU travel mugs. A student’s chances of winning depend on how many students complete the survey; the last time the survey was administered, 1,085 students responded making a student’s odds of winning roughly 1 in 13.

“All student responses are valuable for helping us compare the experiences they report with those of students at hundreds of other colleges and universities,” said Sheila Jones, assistant vice president for the Office of Planning and Assessment. “The results will also indicate important trends in undergraduate education. More voices will make the results more valid.”

Approximately 4,000 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 725 colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada, and approximately 517,000 first‐year students and seniors participated in the 2017 survey. The online survey is accessible by clicking the NSSE survey link in students’ BU e‐mail from Feb. 13 through March 30. Students are encouraged to respond as soon as possible.

Putting studies to use aiding Third World countries

Soon Bethany Noll, a hearing patient herself, will be a clinical audiologist.

However, the third-year Bloomsburg University doctorate student has already put her knowledge and training to good use. Noll, a student in the Clinical Doctorate of Audiology program, began her charitable passion two years ago in Haiti. She has since made several other overseas trips to Guatemala and Zambia.

“I became involved with Entheos through my boss at A&E Audiology,” Noll said. “I began working for her in 2012, and I have been a patient for her since I was 12. She became a member of Entheos and invited me to go with her in 2015 to Haiti. Since that first trip, I have been hooked.”

According to Noll, there is an established deaf community in Leveque where there is a children’s school and a home for deaf children. Noll’s life was immediately flipped upside down when meeting her patients.

“This trip is what captured my heart,” Noll said. “I got to see some of the most impoverished areas in Haiti. I actually got to fit a middle-aged lady with bilateral hearing aids. When we asked her the etiology of her hearing loss, she told us she believes she lost her hearing during the earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010.”

In Haiti is where Noll also fit her first child with a hearing aid.

“Zacary who was such a shy boy,” Noll said. “He had a profound hearing loss. We fit him with bilateral hearing aids and when we fit him, a smile lit up his face. After we went over all the necessary care with him, he rushed over to his friends to show off his new hearing aids.”

A year later Noll said she visited Panajachel, Guatemala. There she met a 16-year-old girl, Esmerelda, who was very nervous about receiving her hearing aids. She was worried that her peers would make fun of her for them, Noll said.

“We gave her the option of black hearing aids or light pink hearing aids,” Noll said. “She was very nervous, so I stepped in and showed her the hearing aids I was wearing, which were hot pink. She became less nervous knowing I was (a young person) and I wore the same hearing aids. Ultimately, she decided on the pink hearing aids.”

Noll returned to Panajachel in January hoping to see Esmerelda again. The first three clinic days passed, but there was no sign of her. On the last day, the group traveled across Lake Atitlan to another school where many people were eagerly waiting for their arrival, including Esmerelda.

“She indicated the hearing aids helped her tremendously, but her ear molds were deteriorating,” Noll said. “She told us how she was planning to go to school to become a teacher the following year. We wanted to fit her with new hearing aids that are a receiver in the ear style so it does not require an ear mold. However, our stock was limited and we did not have hearing aids that were suitable for her hearing loss.”

In that moment, according to Noll, she and her boss decided to take Noll’s hearing aids off her very ears to reprogram for Esmerelda.

“That is exactly what we did,” Noll said. “My hearing aids at that time were considered one of the top of the line hearing aids in the United States, and we gave them to Esmerelda.”

Noll continued her Entheos journey a few months later in June to Zambia. There she fitted hearing aids for a 4-year-old girl, Sylvia, whose family was having trouble paying for her schooling. Noll made it her mission to help find a solution, traveled to the school and met the founder. He agreed to sponsor Sylvia to go to his school and receive the proper education she needed in order to be successful, Noll said.

Soon, according to Noll, it’s back to Guatemala.

“I hope to see Esmerelda again,” Noll said. “I’m so excited to see how she is doing. I’m also excited to just continue to give back the gift of hearing I have been given here in Pennsylvania since I was four. It is the most rewarding experience to give back that gift to other children who have no means of audiological care.”

Noll said she hopes to also travel to Zambia or India next year.

“I’m looking to help at the non-profit audiology clinic that my boss has started in Lancaster County when I can while I’m still in graduate school,” Noll said.

Introducing anthropology to Camp Victory campers

A new anthropology program with an archaeology twist was brought to Camp Victory this summer as part of its Nature Center activities, courtesy of a Bloomsburg University senior’s honors research.

Summer intern Anne Snyder — a triple major in anthropology, French and psychology — created a curriculum in conjunction with Susan Dauria, professor of anthropology, to teach children about local Native American Culture, history and archaeology. The new curriculum was utilized as part of Camp Victory’s Nature Center activities.

“Watching the gears in a child’s brain start to turn, as they ask question after question becoming more and more inquisitive, made me feel like I was making a difference in their life,” Snyder said. “Perhaps I’m sparking an interest in their future field of study. Maybe I was giving them an experience which will spur them to pursue a specific path. Either way, giving a child an experience they may not normally have access to was an honor.”

The setting also added a special touch to Snyder’s summer experience.

“I feel privileged to have had a front row seat to observe children forgetting about their special needs, whether they were engaged in archaeology, playing with the animals at the Nature Center, or having fun with their friends,” Snyder said. “I loved being a part of the Camp Victory experience — a place where children can learn and grow, a place where their special need does not mean they cannot enjoy everything a summer camp has to offer.”

The experience served as both Snyder’s honors project and a research practicum she needs as part of her anthropology major (research track). The creation of this curriculum is part of the transitioning of Dauria’s archaeology summer camp program (that began in 2010 with Quest), to Camp Victory.

“I’ve always had an interest in local Native American Culture,” Snyder said. “I think the intrigue first started when I visited Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico, and I became fascinated with the ways in which Native Americans overcame their living environment to thrive and flourish.”

Snyder said she felt there was a need to teach this local history to children based on her own educational experience growing up.

“I was homeschooled for the first four years of my education, and I learned more about Native Americans in those years than I ever did in the following years going to a local public school,” Snyder said. “I think learning about local Native American history can help encourage diversity and acceptance, because it teaches children that people in the entire world around are the same; they are all looking for different ways to survive.”

Snyder’s program will be a continuation of involvement of BU anthropology students in archaeology and anthropology education for the local community, according to Dauria, specifically to use anthropology and archaeology as a hands-on learning opportunity for children and teens attending Camp Victory, which hosts different weekly groups throughout the summer.

The experience also left a lasting impression — and influence — on Snyder.

“I was planning on going to graduate school for psychology, but now I think teaching is a large part of my life I would like to continue,” Snyder said. “Although I have not decided for certain what I will be teaching, I think being able to educate is now a goal in my life.”

CGA expands disaster relief efforts to #HuskiesHelpingOthers

Building off the success of its #Huskies4Houston campaign, Bloomsburg University’s Community Government Association is launching an expanded campaign to help support those affected by the unprecedented level of natural disasters and tragedies across the world this fall.

Since the impact of Hurricane Harvey on Houston, other recovery efforts relating to Hurricane Maria have begun in Florida and Puerto Rico, as well as the wildfires in California. As a result, CGA is upping its support with #HuskiesHelpingOthers to collect more cleaning supplies, clothing, blankets, etc. to aid those recovery efforts and others heading into the holiday season.

Donation boxes will be placed across campus, in each residence hall, academic, and administration building. CGA president, Joar Dahn, made an initial goal of raising $10,000 for the relief efforts with 25 percent already collected. All proceeds will go directly to verified relief efforts, according to Dahn.

In early September, the #Huskies4Houston campaign run by CGA raised more than $1,100 in just two days for the Houston Food Bank with the help of the Student Athletic Advisory Committee (SAAC). The campaign continued into October, where the athletics department collected 21 boxes of various clothing for those affected by Hurricane Harvey, the costliest Atlantic hurricane in history causing more than $198 billion in damage.

Hurricane Maria cost the small island of Puerto Rico almost $90 billion, and it could take the island another two to three months to fully restore power leaving them with a crippled economy and infrastructure. The wildfires in California have led to more than 20 deaths, hundreds of missing people, and many people left with no homes and no belongings. The shooting in Las Vegas resulted in a death toll of 59 people and hundreds injured.

Bloomsburg university has identified a great need and is making efforts to support that need in every way possible.

“Let’s bring Bloomsburg University together to rally in support for these people who have suffered great loss from these horrible natural disasters and tragedies,” Dahn said. “Let’s help get them back on their feet!”

To donate, go to TakeActionBU.org/huskieshelpingothers.

Digital forensics major lands NSA job months before graduation

Derek Berger knew as early as ninth grade a future in digital forensics was possible. Today, that future isn’t just probable — it’s happening.

Berger, a senior digital forensics major, is Bloomsburg University’s first-ever federal Department of Defense Information Assurance Scholarship Program scholar that has also landed him a full-time position with the National Security Agency once he graduates this spring.

This opportunity — sponsored by the DoD and executed by the NSA — was made possible through BU’s recent designation as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education.

"This scholarship opportunity came from the hard work and dedication my professor, Diane Barrett, has towards the (digital forensics) students,” Berger said. “Each and every professor in this program has the students in mind above everything else, and that is a major aspect in why this program is so prestigious and why it will continue to grow prosperously in the years to come.”

By receiving the CAE designation, BU’s digital forensics program has met stringent criteria in regards to the curriculum, faculty, research and demonstrate an institution-wide commitment to information assurance practices and education.

Jointly sponsored by the NSA and the Department of Homeland Security, CAE programs reduce vulnerability in our national information infrastructure by promoting higher education and research in information assurance by producing a growing number of professionals with information assurance expertise in various disciplines.

“Starting from no knowledge of digital forensics, this program has made me gown immensely in this field in four short years,” Berger said. “This program is designed exceptionally well in getting you on your feet and starting from the basics of computers and forensics.”

Since coming to Bloomsburg, Berger chose to also major in Arabic in order to become a better candidate for a government agency. Once he obtains all the necessary security clearances, Berger will learn more about what his role will be with the NSA following graduation.

“Arabic has made me open my eyes to the world around us culturally and linguistically,” Berger said, “Without this study, I believe it would have lowered the chances of me receiving a federal job.”

BU ranks third in PA for communication disorders sciences majors

Zippia.com, a career planning website, named Bloomsburg University one of the top five schools in Pennsylvania for communication disorders sciences majors. Zippia’s ranking criteria included mean earnings of communication disorders sciences majors six to 10 years after graduation; the percentage of the graduating class of the school that are communication disorders sciences majors, and school performance, such as admissions rate, graduation rate and median amount of debt after college.

BU was ranked third in the poll, just behind University of Pittsburgh and Duquesne University. According to Zippia.com, Bloomsburg’s graduating class size is 2,532 of which 74 were communication disorders sciences majors. The mid-career earnings of a BU communication disorders sciences graduate is about $46,300 annually.

Professional U connection leads to potential internship

Alexandra Hilbert knows the value of Bloomsburg University’s Professional U events — like its recent Accounting Career Connections Expo — firsthand. Her potential summer internship came as a result of one she attended her freshman year.

“I attend all of the career expos,” said Hilbert, a junior dual accounting and economics major. “I was excited about the accounting expo, because I knew there would be reason for me to talk to every table.”

Hilbert said she landed a potential internship with RKL — Central and Eastern Pennsylvania's top CPA and business consulting firm — because of a connection she made two years ago at a Professional U career expo.

“They were impressed by my eagerness to get my name and resume out there,” Hilbert said. “It’s never too early to start networking with professionals.”

At the Accounting Career Connections Expo students networked with representatives from various CPA firms, corporations with large accounting departments, and federal, state and local government entities looking to recruit students for entry-level positions or internships.

According to Hilbert, the accounting expo is one of the many professional development opportunities offered to accounting students. Todd Shawver, chair of the Department of Accounting, has made it a goal this fall to increase those opportunities.

“Dr. Shawver made a BOLT page specifically for accounting majors where information is directly communicated to us,” Hilbert said. “I think the main reason he did this is because BU students have the reputation of performing well, and businesses are constantly coming here to recruit.”

How Professional U can help you!

  • Job/Internship Search Strategies: Employer Panel — Tuesday, Oct. 24, noon to 1 p.m., Job/internship search tips from the pro's. This panel is made up of alumni who have experience finding and hiring people for the positions you are looking for! This is a live, virtual workshop, so you can participate wherever you are!
  • Careers aren’t Scary: Discover Your Path and Map your Future workshop — Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 4 to 5 p.m., MCHS 1316, and Oct. 27, from noon to 1 p.m., Hartline 122. Does picking a career terrify you? Career Coaches will help give you the tools and confidence you need to conquer your fears and make a plan for success!
  • LinkedIn or Left Out: Discover what Makes a Top Notch Profile — Monday, Oct. 30, 5 to 6 p.m., Sutliff 106. If you aren’t online, you don't exist. (Harsh? Not really!) Come learn how to create the polished and professional online presence you NEED employers to find when applying to jobs.
  • Dream Career Photo Booth and LinkedIn headshots! — Tuesday, Oct. 31, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., SSC Lobby Atrium. What do you want to be when you grow up? Come show us and get resources to make your dream job a reality! You can also get a "professional" LinkedIn photos as well so come dressed professionally.
  • Job and Internship Searching workshop — Tuesday, Nov. 7, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., Sutliff 114. Learn tips and techniques to plan your search, find openings (and create your own), and stay organized through your search! This is a hands-on workshop and space is limited so RSVP soon!

Questions? Contact the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience, 201 SSC, cpdce@bloomu.edu or call 570-389-4070.

Getting career ready

Team-building activities, career preparation exercises and alumni networking highlighted a busy three-day schedule for Bloomsburg University’s Career Intensive Boot Camp this fall. A group of junior and senior students from many different majors joined together for a weekend packed full of professional development, coordinated by the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience at the Greenly Center.

“Honestly, I feel like the career intensive boot camp is preparing me for my major and just life in general,” said Keyion Holmes, a senior exercise science major.

Criminal justice program ranked Top 10 in state

Zippia.com, a career planning website, named BU one of the top ten schools in the state for criminal justice majors. Its ranking criteria included mean earnings of criminal justice majors six to 10 years after graduation; the percentage of the graduating class of the school that are criminal justice majors, and school performance, such as admissions rate, graduation rate and median amount of debt after college. BU, ranked 10th, was the only State System school on the list. According to Zippia.com, BU’s graduating class size is 2,532 of which 152 were criminal justice majors. The mid-career earnings of a BU criminal justice graduate is about $46,300 annually.

BU partners with Chesapeake Conservancy on river health

Bloomsburg University is partnering with Chesapeake Conservancy to restore the health of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay. Steven Rier, professor of biological and allied health sciences, is representing BU in the three-year project named “Precision Conservation.”

Precision Conservation,” funded by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, is aiming to restore the ecological health of the Susquehanna River, a main contributor to the Chesapeake Bay. The Susquehanna River dumps approximately 20 billion gallons of fresh water into the bay every day. Much of this freshwater contains excess nitrogen and phosphorus sediment that is disrupting the ecosystem of the bay.

Chesapeake Conservancy has determined that agriculture within the Susquehanna River watershed is responsible for much of the excess sediment and nutrients entering the bay. The goal of the project is to build riparian buffers, rows of trees and shrubs, along bare streams exposed to agricultural sites. Using high-resolution technology and satellite images, Chesapeake Conservancy can determine where to place these buffers efficiently.

“Until now, people recognized the importance of buffers but there was no consistent strategy for prioritizing the placement of individual projects,” says Dr. Rier. “`Precision Conservation` allows for a more precise way to pinpoint where you can get the most value regarding stream restoration.”

BU has taken on the role of analyzing water chemistry and ecosystem functions like metabolic activity and nutrient uptake of the local streams and tributaries connecting to the Susquehanna River. Rier, with the help of biology graduate students Jennifer Tuomisto and Corey Conville, and biology undergraduate senior Aaron Gordon-Weaver, collects water from tributaries and streams that are deemed as high priority areas by “Precision Conservation” technologies. Dr. Rier and his students are then responsible for measuring how much excess sediment is coming into the stream and ultimately determining if the buffers are working in restoring the stream’s health.

“Precision Conservation” is not just improving the water quality of the Susquehanna River and Chesapeake Bay. It is improving the waterways’ ecosystem as a whole and benefitting landowners who allow buffers to be built on their property. The riparian buffers built during this project could potentially improve recreational fishing and hunting, improve the aesthetics of landowners’ properties, maintain health of farmer’s livestock and maximize farmer’s crop production.

“Precision Conservation” is also providing experiential learning to BU students. Grants from the project are supporting BU’s biology graduate students, covering many research costs and providing valuable research experience that will benefit them after BU.

The project is piloting in Centre and Clinton counties with plans to be a statewide in the near future. BU’s current restoration sites can be found along streams and tributaries connecting to Pine Creek and Elk Creek in Centre County. Additional project partners in “Precision Conservation” include Susquehanna University, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Chesapeake Bay Program, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Educational leadership a focus at Integrated Learning Conference

Bloomsburg University’s Master of Education in Educational Leadership (M.Ed.) program was the focus of an informational session this fall at Integrated Learning Conference in State College, specifically its leadership model.

“Participants were selected from a large group of applicants, and it’s with great pride that our group was selected,” said Kathy Specht, BU’s educational leadership intern supervisor.

Thomas Starmack, professor of teaching and learning, led the discussion with an audience of counselors and administrators and incorporated two student perspectives in the dialogue.

Kelsey Shannon, a recent graduate and current high school counselor in South Williamsport, explained the value of the PK-12 exposure and the leadership aspects of her training. The model she was training in parallels the expectations of a school counselor in the American School Counselors Association guidelines, Specht said.

Tiffany Bobeck, a current intern in Hazleton who will be graduating in December, gave insight on the flexibility of the practicum experience and commented on her ability to contribute as an intern, contributions that are noteworthy in her placement district.

Comments and feedback from the audience were quite positive regarding the strong training program that aligns with the PDE requirements set forth in 2014, according to Specht. The final evaluation for the interns mirrors the 2014 Educational Specialist evaluation that counselors in the field are experiencing.

Piscataway Nation Singers and Dancers come to campus

Bloomsburg University’s Office of Multicultural Affairs presents the Piscataway Nation Singers and Dancers. The event will be held on Monday, Nov. 6, at 5 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose B.

Mark Tayac leads the Piscataway Nation Singers and Dancers as they carry on the long-standing traditions, culture and heritage of their indigenous ancestors. They will perform an educational and entertaining pow-wow style event. The performance will feature American Indian dance, drums and song.

The Piscataway were the first Native Americans to encounter Captain John Smith on the banks of the Potomac River in 1608. The Piscataway Nation Singers and Dancers visit college campuses, are contributors to the History Channel and Discovery Channel, play a part in national pow-wows and festivals, and frequently appear at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

How about THIS internship?

Emily Haney is living in a world of opportunities this fall through The Harrisburg Internship Semester (THIS) program.

“You never know who you will run into,” says Haney, a senior anthropology major who is interning with the Historical and Museum Commission in Harrisburg. “And consequently, what kind of doors they could open for you.”

THIS invites students of all majors from any of the 14 Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education to participate in a semester long program, which provides students the opportunity to work in all areas of state government while earning a full semester’s worth of credits and a stipend of $4,000 to live in the state capital.

“The program is run by a wonderful group of people who do their best to match you with an agency best suited to your interests and strengths,” Haney said. “As an intern, your mentors also do their best to make sure you get the most out of your experience.”

Initially, Haney was apprehensive about applying. As an anthropology major, she had no background in public policy and didn’t wish to pursue a future in it. Yet, as she thought it over, she realized having skills in public policy would expand her knowledge base, enhance her resume, and make herself a more attractive candidate for when she applies for graduate school … and eventually a job.

“I have found that the THIS interns are very highly regarded in Harrisburg, and that participating agencies are scattered with past THIS interns who have been offered jobs after graduation,” Haney said. “I know that skills gained from the THIS program are applicable to any type if major, job, or lifestyle.”

Haney’s future career plans include going to graduate school for archaeology with an ultimate goal of gaining a Ph.D. in archaeology and getting a job in museum curation and preservation. She is thrilled to add her new background in public policy concerning historical preservation processes in Pennsylvania to her list of skills.

THIS program is open to any and all majors. The program adapts to the applicants interests and works to create the best possible learning experience for each individual. Not only do students receive first hand experience by attending meetings and working on current projects, but they also meet prominent state government officials making networking a huge benefit.

BU holding third annual No Hate Week

Bloomsburg University is hosting its third annual No Hate Week, focusing on “Love for the Culture” to bring light to different cultures around campus.

  • Campus Church Visitation — This event will be held on Sunday, Nov. 12, at 11 a.m. in Kehr Union Building, room 230, multicultural center. Pastor Martin Harris will speak. His sermon is open to all but is geared towards men.
  • Love for the Cultural March — Registration for the Cultural March will take place at the Kehr Union Building game room on Sunday, Nov. 12, at 3 p.m. The march will begin shortly after registration at the Carver Hall steps and end at the Academic Quad Fountain. Speakers include Dione Somerville, vice president for student affairs, along with students, Vincent Phan and Angela Montano.
  • Do You Know My Cultural? – 13th film showing — This event will be held on Monday, Nov. 13, at 7 p.m. in Kehr Union Building 345 B, multipurpose room. It will be a showing of the film “13th,” which is based upon the 13th amendment of the Constitution, focusing on racial inequality in the United States penal system. Following the film, a discussion will be held with assistant professor Carley Shinault from BU’s political science department.
  • Which Lives Matter? – Monti Washington — Author, speaker, actor, playwright, activist Monti Washington asks the tough question, “Which lives matter?” This event will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 14, at 7 p.m. in Kehr Union Building 345 B, multipurpose room. This is an intense, inclusive, educational lecture intended to build bridges, not walls. By the end of the lecture, students will see that their voices matter, their opinions matter, and most importantly, that “all their lives matter.”
  • Moves to the Cultural – Burn the Nightmare, Release the Love — This event is aimed at students dealing with mental health issues. It will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 15, at 7 p.m. in Kehr Union Building 345 B, multipurpose room. Students will participate in a therapeutic exercise, and be taught how to have sufficient love for themselves.
  • Love for the Cultural Celebration — Wrapping up the week is a celebration bringing it all together. The celebration will be held on Thursday, Nov. 16, at 7 p.m. in Kehr Union Building 345 B, multipurpose room. There will be music and food from all cultures, along with games and a chance to win Husky Gold for attending all events.

Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence

Bloomsburg University students are invited to self-nominate for the annual Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence, sponsored by Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education Foundation. Ali-Zaidi, a charter member of the State System’s Board of Governors, established the award to inspire and honor System students who excel in the pursuit of knowledge. The 2018 statewide award recipient will receive a $1,000 check.

Nominations, open only to seniors, must be in no later than 4 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17. The nomination packet must contain:

  • An essay written by the nominee, addressing how the university prepared him or her for the next career step and what that next step will be. The essay should not exceed two double-spaced pages, using 12 point font. Priority will be given to essays that demonstrate impact beyond the university as a result of the student’s university experience.
  • The nominee’s latest transcript (a copy is acceptable)
  • The nominee’s vita or resume
  • Two letters of recommendation, preferably from university faculty
  • The letters should provide specific details that offer insight into the nominee’s outstanding qualities including, but not limited to, information on the student’s research and co-curricular/creative activities outside of the classroom

(*) Incomplete applications will not be reviewed.

Nominations will be evaluated on:

  • The quality of the nominee’s essay
  • Outstanding performance in the academic major and other areas of study
  • Current GPA, awards, honors projects, faculty-student research, publications, etc.
  • Evidence of distinctive scholarship and/or creative projects with impact on the community, beyond the classroom
  • Participation in extra/co-curricular and/or creative activities during undergraduate years
  • Involvement in student or community organizations and leadership positions held

BU President Bashar Hanna will select one nominated senior as the university’s representative and write a nomination letter to the PASSHE selection committee. To nominate an outstanding senior, send (e-mail, mail or hand deliver) the completed nomination packet to Ali-Zaidi Award Committee, Attention: Jessica Beaver, Office of Planning and Assessment, 2203 McCormick Human Services Center, jbeaver@bloomu.edu, no later than 4 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17.

Campus to celebrate International Education Week

Bloomsburg University is celebrating International Education Week with a week filled with educational opportunities for students including open houses, workshops and lectures.

International Education Week is an opportunity for educational institutions and individuals to celebrate international endeavors, promote international exchange and attract international leaders globally. The week, created by the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education, promotes several educational programs that prepare and educate Americans for life in a global environment.

In honor of International Education Week, BU will host several educational opportunities for students to learn about international opportunities as well as connect with BU’s international student population. The events are sponsored by the Office of Global and Multicultural Education.

  • On Monday, Nov. 13, students are invited to the Student Services Center Atrium for a study abroad open house. At the open house, students will meet the global and multicultural education staff and learn about the educational and internship opportunities abroad.
  • The Center for Professional Development and Career Experience will be hosting a workshop titled “Marketing Your Study Abroad Experience” on Tuesday, Nov. 14, from 6 to 7 p.m. in SSC 004. The workshop will educate students about how to sell their experience abroad to future employers or graduate programs.
  • On Wednesday, Nov. 15, there will be a film screening of “Welcome” at 6 p.m. in Centennial Hall Room 218. Following the film, professor Yahya Laayouni will lead a discussion regarding international themes in the film. At 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall Room 201, professor John McKaig will present his lecture “Revolution and the Birth of Social Realism in Mexican and American Culture.”
  • Students can connect with BU’s international students on Thursday, Nov. 16, at 6 p.m. in KUB Ballroom for tea, coffee and desserts. International students will present about varying countries’ traditions.
  • Wrapping up the week will be international folk dance lessons hosted by the folk dance club on Friday, Nov. 17, in Centennial Hall Room 134 at 6:30 p.m.

Black Hawk landing on Quad for Veteran’s Week

Bloomsburg University will feature a Black Hawk helicopter landing in honor of Veteran’s Week. The landing will take place on Thursday, Nov. 9 at 7:45 a.m. on the Academic Quad and will highlight BU’s Veteran’s Week from Monday, Nov. 6, through Friday, Nov. 10.

The Black Hawk landing will be the main event of this year’s Veteran’s Week and will take place the same day as the Touch-a-Truck event on the Academic Quad. During the Touch-a-Truck event, students will be able to view and interact with the military vehicles, including an H2 Humvee, as well as view the Black Hawk helicopter. Black Hawk, an Army UH60 helicopter, is an aircraft used for utility transport and air assault in the field.

BU’s Office of Military and Veteran’s Resources, BUSVA, the Zeigler College of Business, and the Pennsylvania Army and Air National Guard will sponsor several activities throughout the week to educate students about the military and honor existing veterans. The schedule for the week includes:

Monday, Nov. 6
  • Veterans Breakfast, 7-9 a.m., University Store
Tuesday, Nov. 7
  • Veterans Appreciation Posters, SSC Lobby
  • Airing of Dunkirk and discussion 7-9 p.m., Kehr Union Building Multipurpose B
Wednesday, Nov. 8
  • Guest Speaker: Mike Medvec- BUSVA’s first president 1-2 p.m., Kehr Union Building Multipurpose A
  • Veterans Dinner at the American Legion Post 273, 5-10:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 9
  • Black Hawk Helicopter Landing 7:45 a.m., Academic Quad
  • Touch-A-Truck, Academic Quad
Friday, Nov. 10
  • Veteran Suicide Awareness Walk, SSC Patio/ Academic Quad, Donate!
  • Marine Corps Birthday Celebration, 10 a.m., SSC Patio

Once again, Victory Media is designating Bloomsburg University, a Silver Status Military Friendly school. Victory Media evaluates universities in six categories (academics, admissions, culture, financial aid, graduation and military retention) that measure its accommodations to military students. BU exceeds the Military Friendly standard in three of the six categories by over 70% and scoring within 30% of the 10th ranked school in the category of public universities with fewer than 10,000 students.

Adventure playground to "pop up" on campus

Children will take over Saturday at BU’s Pop-Up Adventure Playground, operated by students and faculty, at the Student Recreation Center. There will be no charge for families and children.

Families are invited to bring their children (12 and under) to the recreation center on Saturday, Nov. 11, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Pop-Up Adventure Playground will feature re-purposed loose parts such as recyclable items, household wares, natural materials and miscellaneous items that are not sharp or made from glass. There is no charge to families or children to attend and attendees can come and go as they want.

BU’s Pop-Up Adventure Playground encourages inexpensive ways to play with everyday objects rather than commercial items. It allows children to make their own choices about how and what objects they will play with.

The playground will be operated by BU students and faculty. To execute a successful Pop-Up Adventure Playground, students and faculty are seeking donations of high-priority items such as cardboard boxes/tubes, duct tape, painter tape, child-friendly box cutters, plastic cups, sidewalk chalk, crayons, fabric carpet squares and wallpaper samples.

If you are interested in donating any of these items, please contact Michael Patte at mpatte@bloomu.edu.

First-ever pop-up playground a big success

Play in America has shifted from an unstructured, child-initiated activity to one that is now predominantly structured and adult-directed. This is the issue Michael Patte, Ph.D., professor of education and child life specialist, explores in his article, “The importance of play on whole child development,” published in Child Life Focus.

“Children’s lives have become progressively more structured both inside and outside of school,” Patte says, “and I’m concerned about the implications it has for their development as a whole person.”

Patte transitioned from public school teaching to university teaching when he realized the decreased focus on play was taking some of the joy out of teaching. He described teaching as part art and part science, where the portion of art is steadily being removed. Transitioning to a university setting has allowed Patte to expand upon and teach the importance of play.

In 2010, Patte spent six months at Leeds Metropolitan University, United Kingdom on a Fulbright Fellowship. During this time, Patte was given the opportunity to learn more about child life specialists and the field of playwork, a profession focusing on the implications of noninterventionist, self-instructed play.

“I hadn’t any notion of what either of these professions were about,” says Patte, “but what drew me to both was that play was at the center, and that was the hook for me. Then I just needed to become a playworker. I needed to become a child life specialist. So I did.”

Pop-Up Adventure Playgrounds use the playwork noninterventionist approach to play that provides children with loose materials to create and explore by means of self-initiated, open-minded exploration. Each playground “pops up” for a short time in a community setting where local children can enjoy this self-structured environment for free.

Patte and students, as well as Greek Life and other student organization volunteers, hosted BU’s first Pop-Up Adventure Playground on Saturday, Nov. 1., 2014. The goal of the event was to educate both children and adults on the topic of child-initiated play. BU students composed fact sheets for adults that clarify these lessons and illustrate their role throughout the Pop-Up experience.

“That’s a bit of a change, even for teachers,” Patte says, “When a child is experiencing some sort of turmoil or trying to figure something out, we have this tendency as parents and teachers to immediately try to intervene and fix the problem.”

Trustee Dr. Joseph Mowad passes away

Bloomsburg University Council of Trustee member Dr. Joseph Mowad of Danville passed away on Tuesday, Nov. 7. Dr. Mowad was appointed to the Council of Trustees in November 1994 serving for more than 23 years. He is survived by his wife, Josephine, and daughters, Dr. Christen Mowad and Nicole Mowad-Nasser and their families.

“Dr. Mowad was a deeply respected member of the Council of Trustees serving Bloomsburg University and its students for over two decades,” said BU President Bashar W. Hanna. “I only had the pleasure to work with him for a short time, but in that period I came to realize what a great friend he was to the university community. He was instrumental in the growth of Bloomsburg University and was a strong advocate of public higher education. Our thoughts go out to his wife Josephine and his daughters during this time.”

Dr. Mowad was senior vice president of Geisinger Health System and director emeritus of the urology department at Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, where he had worked since 1968. He earned his medical degree from Creighton Medical School in Omaha after studying at the University of Scranton, graduating Magna Cum Laude. Dr. Mowad completed his urological and surgical residency at the University of Maryland.

Additionally, Dr. Mowad was a clinical professor of urology at Jefferson Medical College and had served as department chair and assistant medical director at GMC, as well as assistant to the president of Geisinger Clinic. He also served on the board of directors for many Geisinger entities, including Geisinger Clinic, Marworth, Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center and GMC.

Dr. Mowad also served as chairman of the Governor's Renal Disease Advisory Committee. In Danville, Dr. Mowad served on the board of directors of the First National Bank and was elected to the Fulton Financial Corporation board of directors. He had also served on the Montour County Recreation Authority and as a member of the advisory board of the Montour County Advisory Board on Drug and Alcohol Problems and the Montour County Child Welfare Services. He also served on the board of directors for Maria Joseph Manor.

In 2008 he was named an Honorary Alumnus of Bloomsburg University by the school’s Alumni Association.

A Mass of Christian Burial will take place at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017, at St. Joseph Church, with his pastor, the Rev. James M. Lease, officiating. Friends may call at St. Hubert Chapel, located within St. Joseph Church, on Friday, Nov. 10, 2017, from 5 to 7 p.m., and on Saturday from 10 a.m. until the time of services.

Entrepreneur chosen as keynote for ZIPD conference

Providing the keynote address to Bloomsburg University's upcoming Zeigler Institute for Professional Development (ZIPD) Business Conference is Kris Jones, a Pennsylvania native, entrepreneur, investor and best-selling author.

Jones will present “Entrepreneurship, Execution and Giving Back to the Community” on Thursday, Nov. 2, at 11 a.m. in Carver Hall's Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. He will address, "Why do only the 10% succeed?," and present real-world tips and strategies as to why community impact is a key function of entrepreneurship.

His keynote address is open free to the public.

The annual ZIPD conference, hosted by the Terry and JoAnn Zeigler College of Business, will be held Thursday and Friday, Nov. 3, at Sutliff Hall. ZIPD, now in its seventh year, is a comprehensive educational experience designed to build the personal and professional capacities necessary for career success through training and education in business etiquette, professional attire, interviewing, networking and resume writing.

Jones chose an untraditional path to entrepreneurship earning an undergraduate degree in psychology from Pennsylvania State University and a Master’s Degree in experimental psychology from Villanova University. Jones continued his education to a doctorate level, earning a Juris Doctorate from Albany Law School.

In 1999, Jones changed paths and broke into the business world founding Pepperjam, an internet-marketing agency. In 2009, Jones sold the company to eBay Enterprise and later founded and sold several businesses in the Northeastern PA region.

Jones is now the founder of KBJ Capital, an early stage technology investment fund that has funded several multi-million dollar startup companies. Jones serves as CEO of three of the KBJ companies including ReferLocal.com, LSEO.com and APPEK Mobile Apps.

Jones has found success not just as an entrepreneur but also as a best-selling writer and professional speaker.  He published his best-selling book “Search-Engine Optimization: Your Visual Blueprint to Effective Internet Marketing” in 2008 and has contributed over 300 articles to top publications including Forbes, Fast Company and the Chicago Tribune.

Jones speaks around the world on the topics of entrepreneurship and investment to colleges and universities as well as at national business conferences. His most recent speaking engagements included the annual Disney Interactive Global Summit and SEOktoberfest, which he has spoken at five times.

Jones was a finalist for the Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year and awarded Entrepreneur of the Year by Bank of America in 2005 and is also an honorary member of the Volunteers of America Community Philanthropist Award for his dedication to his community.

Collegiate Media Summit

Uncertainty, change and opportunity in mass media will be explored this weekend, Nov. 4 to 5, through a variety of speakers, panels and workshops at the Collegiate Media Summit hosted by Bloomsburg University. It’s the second time BU has hosted the summit in partnership with the State System.

The Collegiate Media Summit was established in 2012 for students to learn more about a future career in mass media field through working professionals with proven success, as well as provide great networking opportunities with those professionals.

Jim Brady, CEO of Spirited Media, will kick off the summit by discussing risks, successes, and failures within the industry. Throughout the day, several panel discussions will take place including the Do the Old Rules Still Apply? Local Television, News in a Changing Social Media World, which features BU alumni Jasmine Brooks and Emmy-nominee, Andy Mehalshick. The event will wrap up with Pulitzer Prize Winner and Indiana University of Pennsylvania alumni, Sue Snyder.

“The value of having a summit like this at Bloomsburg is that you can see the real-world success from some students who graduated from here,” said Sam Porter, a senior mass communications major who recently attended the national PRSSA conference. “You have the opportunity to hear their success stories and ask them questions — and I think that’s a really valuable opportunity that all students, not just mass communications majors, should take advantage of.”

This year’s theme, “Uncertainty, Change, and Opportunity,” will be focusing on how the future of media is seemingly changing by the day.

“The media is something that affects all industries, not just those working directly in the media,” said Amanda Simone, a senior mass communications major. “The media summit is a great opportunity for non-mass communications majors to learn about what is happening in the media industry and how to use the media to best prepare them for their careers.”

Porter added, “If you’re interested in the media industry, regardless of your major, attending the media summit is an awesome opportunity to seek out professionals from our school.”

Division of Theatre and Dance presents ‘The Arsonists’

Bloomsburg University assistant professor David A. Miller, from the Division of Theatre and Dance, will direct performances of “The Arsonists,” a main stage production, at the Alvina Krause Theatre 226 Center St., Bloomsburg. The performances will run from Wednesday, Nov. 1 through Sunday, Nov. 5. Showtime on Wednesday through Saturday is 7:30 p.m. with a finale on Sunday at 3 p.m.

“The Arsonists” is a new translation by Alistair Beaton of Max Frisch’s play, “The Fire Raisers.”

“Fires are becoming something of a problem, but Biedermann has it all under control. He is a respected member of the community with a loving wife and a flourishing business, so surely nothing can get to him. The great philanthropist is happy to meet his civic duty by giving shelter to two new guests, but when they start filling his attic with petrol drums, will he help them light the fuse?”

The 14 member cast includes Noah Eisengrein, Toni Carosella, Kendall Baird, Jonathan Schultz, Carly Carman, Taylor Brigade, Somer Walsh, Kyle Bower, Sorcha Smith, Brandon Ferguson, Rachel Gloss, Madeline Okuniewski, Chris Thorne, and Austyn Redwinski. Tickets are free for BU students with student ID, $6 for adults and $4 for seniors and students. Advance tickets may be purchased at the Haas Center box office or at the door one hour before curtain time.

America’s leading immigration economist comes to campus

George J. Borjas, the Robert W. Scrivner professor of economics and social policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, will speak at Bloomsburg University on Thursday, Oct. 26, at 12:30 p.m. in Carver Hall’s Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

Borjas holds a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University and is a fellow at the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA) where he received the IZA prize in labor economics in 2011. The IZA prize is a biennial prize awarded for outstanding academic achievement in the field of labor economics. It is meant to stimulate research that tries to find answers to the important labor market policy questions of our time.

The professor has published over 150 articles in books and scholarly journals and authored several books including Labor Economics, McGraw-Hill a textbook widely used by economics professors. Most recently, he is best known for the book We Wanted Workers: Unraveling the Immigration Narrative published in fall 2016.

Borjas’ research focuses on the economic impact of immigration and plays a central role in the debate over immigration policy in the United States. As an immigrant who came from Havana, Cuba to the United States in 1962, he ties in both sides of the political immigration argument with statistics and logic to educate his audiences about the immigration narrative in America. He has assisted the Office of the Attorney General of the State of California, the World Bank, and several law firms in litigation related to immigration issues in labor markets.

“I am an immigrant,” says Borjas in his book We Wanted Workers: Unraveling the Immigration Narrative, “and yet I do not buy into the notion that immigration is universally beneficial. But I still feel that it is a good thing to give some of the poor and huddled masses, people who face so many hardships, a chance to experience the incredible opportunities that our exceptional country has to offer.”

Borjas has been featured on the front page of Business Week and The Wall Street Journal being called “America’s leading immigration economist.” The New York Times magazine referred to him as “the pre-eminent scholar in his field” in 2006, while in 2016, Politico recognized Borjas as one of the top 50 “thinkers, doers and visionaries transforming American Politics.” Borjas has appeared multiple times on the C-SPAN television network speaking on immigration matters.

Bloomsburg University hosting lecture on civility in the workplace

As a part of the Faust Memorial Nurse Lectureship Series, AnnMarie Papa will deliver her lecture “What’s Your Motive: Promoting Civility in the Workplace” to Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania on Thursday, Oct. 26, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall’s Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

Papa, a Doctor of Nursing Practice, has over 35 years of nursing experience and speaks around the world about the issues of safety in the workplace, leadership development and inter-professional collaboration. Her lecture, “What’s Your Motive: Promoting Civility in the Workplace,” will inform BU students about how strong leadership creates healthy work environments. The Bloomsburg University nursing department is sponsoring the lecture.

As the vice president and chief nursing officer of Einstein Medical Center at Montgomery, Papa knows what it takes to be a strong leader. Her experience ranges from being an adjunct professor at her alma mater, Villanova University, to serving as president of the Emergency Nurses Association for the 2011 year. Papa is recognized for her accomplishments in the Health Leaders Media Top 20, received the Villanova University College of Nurses Medallion and received the ENA Lifetime Achievement Award in 2016.

Papa holds a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Science degree in nursing from Villanova University and holds a doctorate in nursing practice from Waynesburg University.

‘The Power of Positivity’ coming to campus

Bloomsburg University will be hosting Shane Burcaw and Sarah Yunusov, founders of Laughing At My Nightmare, Inc, who will speak on “The Power of Positivity” on Thursday, Oct. 26, from 4:30 to 5:45 p.m. in McCormick Center 1303. Laughing At My Nightmare, Inc. is an organization dedicated to sharing how humor and positivity can help people overcome their challenges. Their organization also provides grants and vital equipment to people living with muscular dystrophy.

Burcaw is the founder and president of Laughing At My Nightmare, Inc., and an award-winning author and Emmy-winning producer. He also writes a blog with over 600,000 followers. Yunusov is the Director of Development for the organization, and oversees all fundraising efforts.

The College of Education, University Diversity Advisory Committee (UDAC), and BU Student Council for Exceptional Children (SCEC) are all sponsors of this event.

ICS presents ‘Counter Encounter’

Bloomsburg University presents the Institute for Culture and Society (ICS) Fall 2017 lecture series. Dave Kube from the Department of Art and Art History presents his lecture titled “Counter Encounter” on Wednesday, Oct. 18, at 4:30 p.m. in Student Services Center 004. The event is free and open to the public.

Kube uses queer theory as a basis for his visual research. His newest work combines science fiction, queer theory, bold colors and photography to discuss notions of heteronormativity and alternate realities. This presentation will document his creative process and how his latest work has evolved over time. Kube will also speak on influential contemporary artists and look at photography’s role in establishing a dominant viewpoint.

Dave Kube is an assistant professor of photography in the Bloomsburg University Department of Art and Art History. He earned his master’s degree from Tyler School of Art, and his bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois, Springfield.

Professor presents ‘The Plants of Ricketts Glen’

As part of the Bloomsburg University Dean’s Lecture Series, “Science at Bloom,” professor George P. Chamuris presents “The Plants of Ricketts Glen,” Thursday, Oct. 19, at 7 p.m. in Hartline Science Center, Kuster Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

Chamuris’ lecture is on the preliminary inventory of vascular flora found in Ricketts Glen State Park, excluding grasses and sedges. Chamuris has catalogued 262 species of plants that are accessible from the Ricketts Glen hiking trails. Chamuris is a professor in the Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the State University of New York at Albany, master’s degree from James Madison University and a Ph.D. from the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

A new move for Dance Ensemble

A new twist is coming to the Bloomsburg University Dance Ensemble this year. In addition to entertaining the university throughout the fall and spring, including its semester showcases and homecoming, the ensemble will be giving back.

For the first time BUDE will be hosting a dance marathon to raise money for the Children’s Miracle Network at Geisinger Janet Weis Children’s Hospital. Modeled after Penn State’s Thon, the BUDE Dance Marathon will be held Nov. 4, from noon to 6 p.m. in Nelson Field House.

For $10, BU students, faculty, alumni and the public can enjoy live bands, free food, games, prizes and more. Particpants will get to hear the stories of children at Geisinger Janet Weis Children’s Hospital who benefit from the Children’s Miracle Network and see the impact giving back has on these children and their families.

“Dance Ensemble sees the importance of helping others and we invite everyone to join this movement with us,” says Taylor Burnham, president of BUDE.

A great way students can contribute to BU Dance Marathon is by joining BUDE. All student dancers are invited to audition for the ensemble on Sunday, Sept. 17, from 10 a.m. to noon in the back studio of the Student Recreation Center. The student-run organization includes all styles and levels of difficulty.

Auditions require dancers to learn a short combination in jazz and hip-hop; two dance styles BUDE frequently performs at campus events. Dancers are only required to audition once for each class or style of dance. Once dancers have made the ensemble, they can look forward the lifelong friendships and benefits BUDE has to offer.

BUDE is looking for students who are passionate about dance and enhancing their leadership skills. After this year, most of BUDE’s executive board will graduate, opening up several opportunities for new dancers to take on a leadership position in the ensemble.

“Personally, joining dance ensemble has been one of the best decisions I’ve made for my college career, and life after BU,” Burnham says. “Ensemble is a way to express myself creatively while forming lifelong friendships.”

Fidel Castro's daughter kicks off “Una Semana de Orgullo"

London Study Abroad

Alina Fernandez, daughter of former Cuban President Fidel Castro, will speak at Bloomsburg University on Monday, Oct. 9, at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall’s Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. This event is free and open to the public.

In her illuminating talk, Fernandez will share her first-person, account of growing up in Cuba. She also brings up the many, broad-sweeping changes affecting Cuba today and into the future because of Obama-era politics and social and political reforms. She is a witness with a unique vision of her father and of how the country changed after the Revolution. Fernandez, who fled Cuba in 1993, believes that Cuba has an uncertain future, but there is now tremendous potential for a better life in the country for everyone.

This lecture is the first event of the Multicultural Center’s Hispanic Heritage Month celebration. The first week of the month is titled “Una Semana de Orgullo,” or “a week of pride.” Bloomsburg University’s Multicultural Center and the International Faculty Association are sponsoring the event.

ASLP hosts open house event

Bloomsburg University’s Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology will hold an open house for college seniors interested in their graduate programs on Friday, Oct. 13, from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. ASLP graduate programs include:

  • Doctorate of Audiology Program (Au.D.), a four-year clinical doctorate program focused on clinical training and the practical application of research, theory and technology in clinical practice. The first two years of the program emphasizes didactic instruction and laboratory work combining theory, practicality and emerging technology. The emphasis in the final two years is on combining the theory with clinical learning experiences. The fourth year is a full year externship with monitoring and advisement by the faculty and staff.
  • Masters of Science in Speech-Language Pathology (M.S.), a two-year program that prepares students for clinical practice with a variety of communication disorders and in a variety of clinical settings. Students will gain valuable clinical experience in both our in-house clinical and culminating with a full semester of externship practicum in a clinic, hospital and/or school setting. In addition, a Master’s Thesis option is available for those students specialized research interest.
  • Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring (IONM), a 36-credit-hour program for students with a bachelor’s degree to pursue a career as an IONM technologist. Candidates for this program should have a bachelor’s Degree and have had successfully taken courses such as, anatomy and physiology, human biology, medical terminology and applied physics for health sciences, and general psychology.

Tour the facilities, meet the faculty and staff as well as current students and alumni. For more information, or to attend, please contact GayAnne Spezialetti at gspezial@bloomu.edu or phone 570-389-5381.

Review of Greek Life to begin

This semester, a comprehensive review of our Greek Life system is being conducted. Consultants will review the impact of Greek chapters on the Bloomsburg University campus community. They will assess and identify successes as well as issues, challenges and limitations Greek Life faces. Consultants will gather data and perceptions from all stakeholders to provide risk and gain analysis to propose creative options to address issues. Stakeholders, which include Greek and non-Greek students, chapter advisors, Greek Alumni, faculty leadership, and university administration will have the opportunity to provide their perceptions through focus groups, one on one meetings, and surveys.

The consultants will visit campus from Oct. 23 to 27, and the final report is expected before January. After a competitive request for proposal process through the University Procurement Office, the AASCU-Penson Center for Professional Development was awarded the contract for the review. A committee comprised of members of the Greek Alumni Advisory Committee and Student Affairs evaluated each proposal submitted.

Any questions about the review should be directed to Edwin Valovage, director of Student Union and Campus Life, at 570-389-4036 or evalovag@bloomu.edu.

Multicultural Center hosting “Una Semana de Orgullo"

Hispanic Heritage Month is underway, and the Bloomsburg University's Multicultural Center is bringing it all together for “Una Semana de Orgullo."

A week of pride begins with Alina Fernandez, daughter of former Cuban President Fidel Castro holding a lecture on Monday, Oct. 9, at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. She will speak on her experiences and hope for Cuba’s future.

  • Querida Lugo, a lifestyle coach, will be leading a workshop titled “LatinX Leadership: Do It for the Culture.” The workshop is Tuesday, Oct. 10, at 6 p.m. in the Kehr Union Building, Multicultural Center. This workshop will cover the importance of LatinX leadership in current culture. It will provide principles of LatinX leadership, show how to connect purpose and culture, make culture contributions and create pathways.
  • Elizabeth Acevedo, a poet and writer, will also be coming to the Multicultural Center on Wednesday, Oct. 11, at 6 p.m. in the Kehr Union Building ballroom.
  • Una Semana de Orgullo is the Latino Extravaganza on Oct. 14, at 4 p.m. in the Kehr Union Building ballroom. The extravaganza includes a performance by BombaYo. Single tickets for the event are $20 with a table of eight available for $120. The doors will open at 3:45 p.m.

The Multicultural Center, the Student Organization of Latinos, and the BU Program Board are sponsors of the events of Una Semana de Orgullo.

Finding your path at the Majors and Minors Fair

Bloomsburg University will be hosting the annual Majors and Minors Fair on Wednesday, Oct. 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom with more than 100 majors and minors and graduate programs to explore, including a brand new international business major and new English major track in digital rhetoric and professional writing.

The new major in the Zeigler College of Business is designed to prepare students with a wider set of skills and a global mindset. Graduates will step into leadership positions in profit, nonprofit and government organizations that operate across national boundaries.

BU is one of few universities to have this noteworthy major, Jeffrey Krug, dean of the Zeigler College of Business.

“I’m aware of only two other universities in the country that offer this type of degree, the University of South Carolina and University of Southern California," Krug said. "This is a unique opportunity to give students an international business degree that will propel Bloomsburg University in tremendous ways.”

Digital rhetoric and professional writing provides students with hands-on experience with actual projects in the 400 level courses, as well as grounding their work in sound rhetorical strategies. If you're looking to develop your professional identity and web presence, this an ideal option.

Among the newest graduate options is Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring, which encompasses the application of a wide variety of electrophysiological methods to monitor the functional integrity of neural structures during surgery. Monitoring the state of the nervous system in “real-time” during surgery allows for corrective actions to be implemented to prevent permanent deficits, thus improving patient safety and surgical outcomes.

Bloomsburg University's IONM post-baccalaureate certificate program is aimed to bridge the gaps between the increasing demand of qualified technologists and lack of formal educational programs by providing a one year training program for students interested in pursuing a career as IONM technologists.

The Majors and Minors Fair is open to all students from freshman to seniors. This is a great opportunity to speak to facility and current students in the different major and minors to get a feel for what is best for you here at BU!

Major and Career Exploration Workshops

Can't wait? Let's explore today!

  • Monday, Sept. 25, at 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., SSC 004 (under Roongo’s café)
  • Tuesday, Sept. 26 , at 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., SSC 004 (under Roongo’s café)
  • Wednesday, Sept. 27, at 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., SSC 004 (under Roongo’s café)
  • Monday, Oct. 2, at 5 p.m., McCormick Center 1316

Questions? Visit the CPDCE in 201 Student Services Center, Tuesday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., or email cpdce@bloomu.edu.

Celebrity Artist Series returns for its 33rd season

Bloomsburg University's Celebrity Artist Series returns for its 33rd season welcoming an outstanding line up of performers.

This series includes a lineup of six different shows returning for the second year of the On Screen/In Person film series which tours new independent American films and their respective filmmakers to communities across the mid-Atlantic region. Here at BU we call the series Mostly Monday’s at the Movies, and the first film will be screened Monday, Sept. 18 in Gross Auditorium at 7 pm. DEEJ tells the story of a young man, DJ, a non-speaking autistic who is a gifted writer and advocate for other nonspeaking autistics.  Films in October, November and into spring semester will confront subjects ranging from the environment, mental illness, sports, domestic violence, and the Holocaust.

  • Preservation Hall Legacy Quintet — and The Soul Queen of New Orleans, Miss Irma Thomas on Saturday, Nov. 4 at 7:30 p.m. in Mitrani Hall. The Preservation Quintet is comprised of some of the most revered alumni of the Hall, many of whom have toured the world for decades. Joining the tour is Irma Thomas, a Grammy Award-winning singer with her own rich musical history. She is one of America’s most distinctive and classic singers, a treasure from the golden age of soul music who remains as compelling and powerful now, as when she released her first single in 1960. Altogether, you will be getting a stimulating evening of New Orleans’ musical royalty.
  • The Illusionists present Adam Trent — on Saturday, Nov. 18 at 7:30 p.m. in Mitrani Hall. The Next Generation of Magic is Broadway’s best-selling magic show, which is an immersive entertainment extravaganza of magic, comedy and music designed to entertain students and families. Adam Trent has been a featured guest on America’s Got Talent, The Today Show, Ellen, and countless other TV appearances. Yahoo! Entertainment reports, “If you are looking for the next big thing in Magic, look no further than Adam Trent.” The Illusionists sold out when it appeared in Bloomsburg three years ago. Buy your tickets early!
  • The Ten Tenors — will be performing their “Home for the Holidays” series on Friday, Dec. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in Mitrani Hall. Following 20 years of sell-out performances across the globe, the Ten Tenors are undoubtedly one of Australia’s greatest entertainment success stories. Celebrated for their colorful repertoire, breathtaking arrangements and powerful live performances, the TEN Tenors respectfully tip their hats not only to the great classical composers, but also to contemporary music’s most popular artists. More than 90 million people worldwide have witnessed their unmistakable charm, camaraderie and vocal power. Buy your tickets early for the best possible seats and make your preshow dinner reservations ASAP, because this will definitely be a huge holiday date night in Bloomsburg!
  • Berlin Philharmonic Piano Quartet — helps us return from winter break on Saturday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Gross Auditorium. The 135-year-old Berlin Philharmonic is consistently ranked as one of the best orchestras in the world. Since 1970 it has earned eight Grammy’s, two Classic BRIT Awards, six Gramophone Awards (aka Oscars for classical music), and numerous additional international awards. For lovers of classical music, or those hoping to broaden their musical taste, or anyone at all, the opportunity presented by Celebrity Artist Series to hear a performance by musicians of this caliber and sophistication in Gross Auditorium, where the acoustic are perfect for this kind of sound, is unmatched and unprecedented.
  • Dublin Irish Dance — Put on your dancing shoes Friday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. Directly from Dublin, Ireland, Celebrity Artist Series will present Dublin Irish Dance. Choreographer Anthony Fallon, a principal dancer with Riverdance for 12 years, is also a four-time World Irish Solo Dance Champion. The Dublin Irish Dance company is vibrant troupe of world champion Irish step dancers, together with an eight-member traditional Irish band and vocalist, who have performed throughout the world with Riverdance, Michael Flatley’s Lord of the Dance, and Celtic Women. Fallon and his all-star cast will bring to life in Mitrani Hall the epic tale of Celtic culture in a gala celebration of Irish music and dance. For the Irish and Irish at heart, this performance arrives just weeks before St. Patrick’s Day and recalls the rousing enjoyment from other great Celtic musicians previously presented by Celebrity Artist Series.
  • The Cashore Marionetters — The season's final show presents The Cashore Marionetters on Friday, April 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Gross Auditorium. For centuries, artists and performers have used their creative talents to illustrate simple but important messages to people of all ages, especially children. Joseph Cashore’s Life in Motion portrays commonplace but universal emotions through a collection of his marionette masterworks. His exquisite artistry and refinement of movement turn his marionettes into characters of depth, integrity and humanity. Interpreted through a series of vignettes, themes of love, joy, sadness, humor, loss, remembrance and acceptance are evoked by diverse and engaging characters and animals in different contexts. Delivered with a simplicity that expresses the essence of the moment, set to music by Beethoven, Vivaldi, Strauss and Copeland, with themes taken from everyday life, the Cashore Marionettes take the audience on a journey that celebrates the richness of life. Presented in the intimacy of Gross Auditorium, this show is a powerfully entertaining, theatrically satisfying, one-of-a-kind evening for everyone young and old.
  • Thinking study abroad?

    Bloomsburg University’s Office of Global and Multicultural Education will hosted a Study Abroad Fair on Sept. 13 in the KUB Ballroom. BU’s study abroad program offers students career-enhancing experiences and new perspectives vital to both personal and professional growth.

    Students discover, explore and experience economics, arts and culture, science, and education in a new part of the world. The once-in-a-lifetime experience allows them to contribute to greater intercultural relations and improved ecological sustainability.

    The Study Abroad Fair gives students the opportunity to gain insight about the different study abroad programs and scholarship opportunities available to them. In addition, students can meet both BU and international students who have studied abroad and learn about their experiences.

    “London was a place I've always wanted to go to for as long as I can remember,” said Ashley Sulon, a sophomore mass communications major pursuing a minor in music. “With it being in the summer, too, I was able to get myself ahead in credits!”

    Sulon said her favorite memory was sharing the experience with one of her closest friends.

    "Making so many memories on this trip was the best part,” Sulon said. “I loved learning about the history of Britain and how it differed from America history. Just branching out of my comfort zone with these classes was beneficial to me academically. We also had weekends off to travel, so my friend and I got to experience Hamburg, Germany and Paris, France. Each place had their own unique lifestyle, and it was amazing to experience all the food, culture, and people.”

    Choosing the London trip came about from a sort of duality

    “I had always been interested with British culture and history," said Troy Platukus, a senior digital forensics major. "The city has been around for way longer than any city in the United States, so I knew there would be a lot of cool areas to explore. I am also a big fan of the British Social Realism film movement, so I knew there would be great opportunities to experience all different arenas of art.”

    As a self-proclaimed film buff, visiting the studio lot where the Harry Potter movies were filmed was a memorable moment for Platukus abroad.

    “It was incredible to see the real locations from what was such a large part of my childhood,” Platukus. “I was also a big fan on the Imperial War Museum, and visiting the 'off-West End' theatre productions. These were often times performed in areas not much bigger than classrooms, with 100 seats maximum. The ingenuity of completing these productions with such limited space was fascinating.”

    Platukus admits his time in London was life changing.

    “Getting out of your comfort zone and experiencing a different country is integral to our growth and transition from college students to adults in the ‘real world,’” Platukus said. “The experiences I had on this trip will stay with me forever, and I include my trip to London on the list of the best decisions I've ever made.”

    Phi Beta Sigma helps area HS get ready for new year

    Phi Beta Sigma

    Vincent Phan capped his summer by going back to school, twice.

    In addition to starting his senior year at Bloomsburg University, Phan and a few of his Phi Beta Sigma fraternity brothers organized a service event at his old high school, where they handed out school supplies to students on their first day at G.A.R. Memorial High School in Wilkes Barre.

    “G.A.R. Memorial is considered to be one of the rougher schools in that school district,” said Phan, a digital forensics major and vice president of Phi Beta Sigma. “I wanted to show the younger generation that alumni still care and remember where they come from. Also, I wanted to show the importance of giving back.”

    G.A.R. staff members were very proud to see an alum give back to their high school. The students on the other hand, according to Phan, were shy and surprised to see the fraternity brothers and Phan at the school. They were happy to see school supplies that would help them with their upcoming school year, Phan said.

    In the past, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity has done several service events for the campus community and even nationally. One of the bigger service events the fraternity organized was a water drive for Flint, Michigan. In the near future, Phi Beta Sigma is planning an event where all the proceeds go towards the Hurricane Harvey relief.

    “I would like to thank my high school faculty for giving me the chance to return and give back to the students,” Phan said. “I would also like to thank (Madelyn Rodriguez) and (Gretchen Osterman) for some of the donations of school supplies. I hope this service event will inspire other students of the university to give back to where they come from.”

    Finance major on extended business trip to Europe

    Denmark Study Abroad

    Two of Lilla Feher’s biggest college goals were to go to Europe and position herself for success in business. With the help of PASSHE’s Study Abroad Award program the junior Bloomsburg University finance major is accomplishing both this fall.

    “I chose Aarhus, because the credits would transfer back to Bloomsburg and its business school is in the top 100 universities in the world,” explained Feher, also an information and technology management major. “The education was the most important part to me. Also, I had been hearing fantastic things about Denmark.”

    Some of these fantastic attributes include Denmark being named the happiest country in the world in 2016. The city Aarhus, where Feher is studying, was named the 2017 European Capital of Culture.

    “Here in Denmark I am part of the ‘Business and Social Sciences’ faculty,” Feher said. “I’m taking all business classes here, including international finance, which I think is amazing I can take it ‘internationally.’”

    As far as career goals, Feher says she wants to become a personal financial advisor.

    “I would love to keep ties with Denmark and potentially even work here,” Feher said. “So we will see where life takes me after this journey.”

    Bringing “Positive Vibes” to campus

    Kareem L. Williams, uplift advocate, entrepreneur, and author, will be at Bloomsburg University on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 6 p.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center discussing “Trials, Tribulations & Triumph,” which will focus on encouraging young people to redefine themselves and his mantra “positive vibes only.”

    Williams, a north Philadelphia native, has spoken to high school and college campuses around the country. His message of redefinition and motivation to young people has spread internationally as his most recent public speaking opportunity took him to a high school in Madrid, Spain. He has published his own self-help book targeted at young people called Step Aside: A Simple and Effective Guide for Helping You Get Out of Your Own Way.

    Williams encourages young students that no matter how bad the situation, they can turn their life around in a positive way. As a young person he took the wrong path and found himself in a juvenile placement facility, Williams used an unfortunate situation as a second chance to redefine himself. Williams now holds an undergraduate degree in business management from Cheyney University, his M.B.A. from Strayer University and has spoken internationally.

    Williams preaches to young people that it is not “where you come from that matters, but where you’re going.” “Trials, Tribulations & Triumph” is sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, Men of Intelligence, Notability and Desire.

    Analyzing the pop culture of Jay-Z

    Frederick Douglass LC

    Bloomsburg University’s Frederick Douglass Institute and PLEXUS Living Community will host a Listening Conversation Part One: Analyzing the Pop Culture of Jay-Z on Monday, Sept. 25, at 6 p.m. in the KUB Multipurpose Room B. Refreshments will be served preceding the discussion at 5:30 p.m.

    BU’s Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence, under the inspiration of Frederick Douglass and other distinguished leaders of all racial and ethnic backgrounds, promotes academic excellence among students and enhances their understanding and appreciation of human diversity.

    PLEXUS welcomes freshmen who are pursuing any major or who are presently undeclared. This Learning Community intertwines with the Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence to promote academic excellence in a racially and culturally diverse setting. The institute is part of a State System of Higher Education collaborative established to enhance the academic life of participating universities and to enrich campus climate by promoting diversity.

    Jay-Z's recently released album, 4:44, addresses important topics such as issues affecting the LQBTQA community, financial literacy, race, parenting, healthy relationships and the environment. 4:44 provides an opportunity to engage students in dialogue about issues that are important to many within the university community.

    In addition, the talk will provide an opportunity for community members to engage in rhetorical analysis of the lyrics of a popular culture icon with the lyrics as a starting point to engage in social science research.

    Celebrating the success of largest ever capital campaign

    Bloomsburg University and the BU Foundation celebrated the conclusion of the It’s Personal capital campaign by announcing the seven-year fundraising effort had achieved a university-record total of $62,075,064.

    The initial goal for It’s Personal: The Campaign for Bloomsburg University was $50 million by the end of December 2017. However, by early November 2016, the university exceeded its mark by more than $10 million. The campaign closed six months earlier than anticipated to coincide with the retirement of former Bloomsburg University President David Soltz.

    BU's community of donors, alumni, faculty and staff celebrated this historic milestone and the impact it will have on the future on the university’s academic quad. The evening culminated with a fireworks display that served as both a celebration of the campaign’s success and the kickoff to the weekend’s homecoming festivities.

    “I am thrilled to share in this remarkable achievement with the entire Bloomsburg University Community,” said BU President Bashar W. Hanna. “I look forward to taking the next steps together with all of you as we build on the positive momentum and energy created with this campaign.”

    “Seven years ago, when Dr. Soltz and Bloomsburg University began to build their vision for what they thought this campaign could accomplish, these are exactly the types of results we were hoping for,” said It’s Personal Campaign Chair, Duane Greenly. “I always had faith that we would reach our goal, but as I stand here tonight, it is hard for me to express how proud I am to be a part of the Bloomsburg University community and to see how we have come together to turn this dream into a reality.”

    Former BU President David Soltz also returned to campus to join in the celebration and to express his appreciation to the donors and alumni, faculty and staff who helped to make the It’s Personal campaign a success.

    “When we started the It’s Personal campaign, we set an ambitious goal and tonight, we celebrate not only achieving that goal, but exceeding it quite substantially,” said former BU President David Soltz. “But the most exciting part is that this is just the beginning of something so much bigger.”

    The resounding success of the It's Personal campaign has achieved more than just a financial goal. Faculty, staff and students are already benefiting from 137 new scholarship opportunities, and countless programs and initiatives resulting from the generosity of more than 17,800 individual donors and the impact they have made through this campaign.

    Nine new Named Endowed Professorships and Fellowships have been established throughout the It's Personal campaign. Eleven Professional Experience Grants have been designated in support of Professional U. In addition, Professional U supports two, new college-based institutes that combine curriculum with professional experiences.

    The campaign also provided resources which resulted in Bloomsburg’s first named college, the Zeigler College of Business, the naming of several facilities including Steph Pettit Stadium, and the construction of the Greenly Center, the new home for the BU Foundation and BU’s first official presence in downtown Bloomsburg.

    Neuropsychology with a comedic twist

    Matt Bellace, motivational speaker, psychologist, and comedian, will speak at Bloomsburg University’s Carver Hall, Gross Auditorium, on Sunday, Sept. 17, at 1:30 p.m. The event is free. Bellace’s comedic presentation, “A Better High,” promotes the Healthy Husky initiative to educate students about the misuse of drugs and alcohol.

    Bellace has traveled to high schools and college campuses as a motivational speaker and comedian for over 20 years educating young people about how to get high naturally without the use of drugs and alcohol. His presentations are based on his “How to Get High Naturally” program and his book “A Better High.”

    In addition to “A Better High,” Bellace has co-authored the National Geographic kids series, “This or That,” and appeared regularly appeared on truTV’s, “World’s Dumbest.” Bellace’s books and presentations focus on natural highs and making healthy choices. Bellace, who holds a Ph.D. in clinical neuropsychology, uses an informative yet humorous approach to engage and interact with his audiences.

    “My background in neuroscience and emotional memory is not lost during my presentations,” says Bellace. “It helps me understand my audiences better and I know if they’re laughing, they’re listening.”

    “A Better High” with Matt Bellace is sponsored by Healthy Husky and BU Athletics and is made possible due to the NCAA CHOICES grant awarded to BU this year. BU will use the three-year $30,000 grant, presented by the NCAA Foundation and Anheuser-Busch Company Inc., to implement more campus opportunities like “A Better High” with Matt Bellace. BU’s goal is to create shifts in campus culture that will reduce the prevalence underage drinking, sexual misconduct, and harassment or violence due to the misuse of drugs and alcohol across campus.

    Diversity consultant to speak on building greater inclusion

    The Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington will speak at Bloomsburg University on Monday, Sept. 18, at 6 p.m. in Mitrani Hall, located in Haas Center for the Arts. His lecture is titled, “Building Capacity for Greater Inclusion: Our Work for the Next Round.” This lecture is free and open to the public.

    Dr. Washington has served in higher education for over 33 years and is best known as the president and founder of the Washington Consulting Group (WCG). In 2015, WCG was named one of the Top 10 Global Diversity Consultants in the world by the Economist. Dr. Washington is also the president and co-founder of the Social Justice Training Institute, and vice president and current president elect of the American College Personnel Association (ACPA). He currently serves as the pastor of Unity Fellowship Church of Baltimore and is known as “The Engagement Specialist,” because he sees himself as an instrument of change.

    Dr. Washington has a bachelor’s degree from Slippery Rock State College, double Masters’ of Science degrees from Indiana University Bloomington, and a Ph.D. in College Student Development from University of Maryland College Park. He also earned his Masters of Divinity from Howard University School of Divinity. Dr. Washington was most recently awarded the Legends of Excellence Award from the University of Maryland Baltimore County for his contribution to the lives and education of Black and LatinX faculty, staff and students. He holds many other awards for his diligence toward helping people find the best in themselves and others.

    The American College Personnel Association (ACPA) is sponsoring the lecture while the College of Education, the Multicultural Center, the Women’s Resource Center, and the LGBTQA Resource Center are co-sponsors.

    Welcome to the new semester

    Welcome to 2017-18 academic year, I am delighted to be serving BU as its 19th president.

    More than 2000 freshmen and transfer students, 22 new faculty and I will be the newbies on campus. Please treat us nicely as we wander campus in search of the right building or classroom.

    I am grateful for the warm welcome extended to me by our faculty, staff and students. The BU family has much to be proud of, including our beautiful campus, our exceptional academic offerings, and our commitment to ensuring a safe and inviting environment for all. Welcoming the new freshmen to campus during the move-in process was delightful and extremely organized. Much credit goes to the Residence Life staff, especially the OWLS!

    Each one of us regardless of discipline or job description plays a critical role in the success of Bloomsburg University. Our students and their family trust us and count on us to help shape teenagers into successful and responsible citizens who are poised to lead.

    I look forward to an extraordinary academic year together. I am especially excited at meeting all of you in the coming weeks and months. To that end, I will be hosting university employees at small “meet and greet” gatherings throughout the academic year at Buckalew Place, the president’s residence.

    Additionally, I will be holding weekly student and employee open office hours. More detailed information on the “meet and greet” sessions and open office hours will be announced through weekly emails.

    Have a wonderful semester. I will see you on campus and as always Go Huskies!

        Dr. Bashar W. Hanna, president

    Sabbaticals granted for 2018-19

    Faculty Sabbaticals

    The following faculty have been granted sabbatical, beginning Fall 2018:

    • Ferda Asya, English, Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 — will finish two projects simultaneously, a book titled Edith Wharton's Fictions of Nonconformity: A Transatlantic Anarchist Reading, and a book titled Approaches to Teaching the Novels of Edith Wharton. The first project has been reviewed and accepted by Cambridge University Press. A formal proposal will be submitted to MLA for the second project. Two published books will result from this sabbatical.
    • Kevin Ball, psychology, Summer 2018 and Summer 2019 — advance the overall research objective of identifying the environmental factors and neural mechanisms that contribute to individual differences in vulnerability to addiction and relapse. The involvement of mPFC DA in the effects of chronic stress on reinstatement of drug- and palatable food-seeking behavior will be assessed. Site-directed infusions of SCH23390 will be used to determine the role of D1Rs in specific regions of mPFC in chronic stress' effects on relapse. Students will be provided the opportunity to engage in challenging hands-on research. Presentations and publications will result from the work.
    • Susan Dauria, anthropology, Spring 2019 — will transcribe, consolidate, organize, and write a manuscript for volume two of Voices from the Fair. Two manuscripts will be submitted, one to the Fair Association and one to The Journal of Folklore Research. Additionally an abstract will be submitted to the American Anthropological Association for presentation in 2019-20. Ultimately, the sabbatical will result in the production of a book, a report, an article, and a professional presentation that will apply oral history and anthropological theory to a collection of data that has been assembled over the last seven years.
    • Betina Entzminger, English, Spring 2019 — work on a writing project that blends genres. Part history, part biography, and part fictionalized memoir, the hybrid piece will tell stories of real women who lived between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries and overcame suffering and loss. The sabbatical period will be used to focus on research as well as creative work of developing these stories. The complete work will be comprised of a series of approximately ten interconnected stories, each focused on a different female character. The ultimate goal is to publish the whole collection of interconnected pieces.
    • Heather Feldhaus, sociology, social work and criminal justice, Fall 2018 — conduct in-depth life history interviews with individuals who have experienced homelessness in rural Pennsylvania. Work will be conducted with student researchers from the Center for Community Research and Consulting to gather additional data on public policy surrounding homelessness, local practices and beliefs surrounding homelessness, press coverage of homelessness, and the human and economic costs of homelessness in our region. Interviews with populations that initial analysis suggest more information should be obtained, thorough analysis of all data will be conducted, findings from the multiple student projects within this project will be drawn together, and research articles and likely a book prospectus will be written. Due to complex ethical challenges surrounding this topic, proposals will be submitted to the Bloomsburg University IRB and the Geisinger Health System IRB. Additionally, training with the sate on mandated reporter issues relevant to this work will completed.
    • Eric Hawrelak, chemistry, Spring 2019 — continue collaboration, which began the summer of 2016, with Dr. Philip Osburn, at Bloomsburg University, on a synthetic project that will combine two individual areas of synthetic expertise. Dr. Osburn has developed a novel family of pyridine-based, mixed-donor (sulfur and carbon atom) pincer ligands. The sabbatical project involves the synthesis of metal complexes with the described pincer ligands. A particular emphasis will be placed on using the metal iron in the complexes. The metal complexes will be further studied for potential catalytic transformations of organic substrates into useful organic products. The research also has potential in the area of catalysis that could be used in the field of renewable energy. This new project will revitalize the research laboratory and offer more opportunities for peer-reviewed publications, peer-reviewed grant-funding, and student involvement.
    • Karl Kapp, instructional technology, Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 — design and develop a virtual reality (VR) video game focused on teaching math and computational skills. The project involves crafting a design for the game, creating storyboards, and choosing the right software and programming. The 3D video game translates research-based findings from the existing body of game-based learning literature to a tangible expression in the form of a working, high quality VR video game. The resulting innovative game will help students learn math skills through a branching "choose-your-own-adventure" design.
    • Stephen Kokoska, math and digital sciences, Spring 2019 — will complete a third edition of the Introductory to Statistics text as requested by publisher, WH Freeman. To prepare the third edition, all new graphics will be created using Mathematica, replacing approximately 30 percent of all examples and exercises, rewriting editing, adding sections as suggested by reviewers, and including two new technology solution techniques: R and python. The sabbatical will allow for the necessary time to learn, review, and utilize these new publishing and technical methods to produce the third edition of the text.
    • Arian Khaleghi Moghadam, economics, Fall 2018 — will address the relationship between the release of toxic pollutants and mobility of households, which is essential to understanding whether there are significant variations in the level of pollution faced by households based on ethnicity, economic resources, and other sociodemographic characteristics and to what extent the level of pollution can explain mobility of households among different groups. Micro-level household data along with neighborhood-level toxic pollution data will be used to investigate the determinants of household proximity to polluting factors. Results of the sabbatical will produce academic papers that will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals, and will be implemented in the Environmental Economics course under the topic of "toxic substances and environmental justice."
    • Mehdi Razzaghi, math and digital sciences, Fall 2018 — will write a book entitled "Statistical Models in Toxicology," leading to publication by CRC Press, and to research a problem relating to the theory of generalized linear models, "Extending the Random Effects Models for Count Data with Underdispersion." The research problem is an extension of the Poisson regression to model count data in generalized linear models when the data exhibit underdispersion that is when the variance falls below the mean. In this extension, the hyper-Poisson distribution, a generalization of the Poisson model with a parameter that accounts for over/underdispersion is utilized. Results of the research on count modeling will be written as a paper and submitted to a scholarly journal for publication.
    • Steven Si, management and international business, Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 — will write a textbook on entrepreneurial management focusing on entrepreneurial theory and practice with strategic and innovative perspectives, the contents will include: Entrepreneurship: an introduction; Entrepreneurial environment; Entrepreneurial mindset; Creativity & opportunity analysis; Business plan; Entrepreneurial business model; New ventures and others. This textbook will expect to demonstrate: (1) strategic and innovative perspectives; (2) some outstanding cases from the entrepreneurial practice; and, (3) contents and cases related with sharing economies.
    • Luke Springman, languages and cultures, Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 — will research the propagation of colonialism among young people during the German Weimer Republic. Based on sources such as school textbooks, films, popular literature and government documents, the analysis will trace mechanisms of ritualized remembering and the myth-building surrounding Germany's colonial past and projections for the future. Approximately six months of research at archives, libraries and universities in Germany will be required to complete the research for this project which will result in a published book.
    • Anna Turnage, communication studies, Fall 2018 — explore the theoretical possibilities of visual metaphor criticism, primarily involving the analysis of visual artifacts, most notably public art projects across the U.S., to help establish and demonstrate the method as viable in the realm of rhetorical criticism. Numerous journal publications, and potentially a book, may come to fruition from this research project.
    • Ju Xin, physics and engineering, Spring 2019 — will participate in a research project titled "Experimental Realization of Two-dimensional Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in Ultracold Fermi Gas" at the Institute of Opto-electronics, Shanxi University China. This project will contribute to efforts at the Ultracold Atomic Laboratory in the Department of Physics and Engineering at Bloomsburg University. While at the host institution, to promote further academic exchange, a series of open lectures will be offered to students including topics ranging from Einstein's special theory of relativity, historical developments of modern physics, and sustainable energy.

    Civil Air Patrol cadets get up-close look

    Civil Air Patrol

    A group of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) cadets from across Pennsylvania recently spent a day at Bloomsburg University as part of their summer STEM experience, specifically getting an up-close look at its innovative digital forensics program.

    Led by Scott Inch, Ph.D., CCE, professor of mathematical and digital sciences, the group of 14 students learned how computers store files and what happens when they are deleted. The students then put their new knowledge into action by recovering several deleted pictures. The group also learned about the hidden data that is often present in various types of files.

    As the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, CAP offers year-round opportunities for youth 12 to 19 years old to fly, hike, camp and learn to lead through its cadet program.

    BU offers the only digital forensics bachelor’s degree in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education and is Pennsylvania’s Center for Digital Forensics. Graduates of the program work in law enforcement, homeland security agencies, law firms and private companies.

    Last year, BU received designation as a National Center of Academic Excellence (CAE) in Cyber Defense Education with a focus in the area of digital forensics. The CAE designation, jointly sponsored by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security, recognizes BU’s digital forensics program has meet stringent criteria in regards to the curriculum, faculty, research, and demonstrates an institution-wide commitment to information assurance practices and cyber defense education.

    Students stay busy with summer research

    Summer Research

    More than 30 student research projects are underway this summer throughout the region and even overseas. Pennsylvania’s bootleg coal rebellion, the effects of beetle infestation and in-home Internet hacking are just a few of the topics being explored through Bloomsburg University’s annual Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity program.

    URSCA provides a stipend of up to $6,000 for a full-time project to students during the 12 weeks of summer session. Thirty-two students of varying majors spanning business to liberal arts to science and technology were awarded research grants this summer.

    Several of the projects are being done far from campus, including abroad like David Falacko’s study of new musical styles with master musicians at the Royal College of Music in London and Rachel Yenney’s work as a research intern in the Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers in Paris. Facia Sirleaf’s study of Sub-Saharan immigration in Morocco was actually a year in the making and inspired by her own personal journey as a child.

    The environmental, geographical and geological sciences are well represented this summer. Student researchers are tackling a variety of environmental issues to include acid mine drainage in Schuylkill County, the deforestation and water quality in Assateague, Va., along with the petrographic examination of copper deposits from across the country.

    Other summer projects have students exploring research in the anthropology, digital forensics, information technology management, nursing, political science, sociology, and social work fields.

    Some projects, such as Blake Durante’s chemistry research on different properties of lanthanum chlorides in aqueous solutions, have already hit the conference circuit. The senior presented his initial findings this spring at the 253rd American Chemical Society National Meeting in San Francisco. He plans to advance his work this summer, particularly in increasing accuracy.

    Each of the URSCA projects will have an opportunity in August to be showcased on campus during the 7th Annual Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium. Abstracts will be judged in four categories: social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering, biological sciences and in clinical and translational.

     

    2017 URSCA Awards

    • Classic Maya Elite Households: Exploring Socioeconomic Status within the Chok Group at El Perú-Waka’, Petén, Guatemala by Emily Haney, senior anthropology major
    • Painting With Pixels by Bela Ball, junior art studio major
    • Study at the Royal Academy of Music by David Falacko, senior music major
    • Pennsylvania’s Bootleg Coal Rebellion by Mitch Troutman, sophomore history major
    • Data Modeling for Predictive Analytics by Ty Rohrbach, junior business administration information and technology management major
    • Determination of Stress Response Genes, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 and Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyltransferase, in the Solitary Bee Species, Megachile rotundata, in Response to Heat Shock by Brandon Arnsberger, senior biology pre-med major
    • Using Nonlinear Regression to Develop an Engineer-Friendly Equation for Calculating the Ionic Mobility in Aqueous Potassium Chloride Solutions under Extreme Conditions by Daniel Staros, junior chemistry major
    • Geochemical Assessment of the Wiconisco Creek and the Effects of Abandon Mine Drainage on Water Chemistry by Mitchell Lenker, senior geology major
    • Water Quality of Vernal Pools by Anna Ellis, sophomore geography and planning major
    • Comparative Study of Alteration Zones From Some Porphyry-Type Deposits in the United States by Connor Gray, junior geology major
    • Role of D1-like Receptors in the Effects of Chronic Stress on Palatable Food Seeking in an Animal Model of Relapse by Lindsay Tosh, senior psychology major
    • Designing a program to Assist Foster Youth in the Transition to College by Wanda Tarvin, senior social work major
    • A Study on the Practicality of Identifying and Locating Shoplifters and Drug Users Through Tumblr by Megan Mahle, junior digital forensics major
    • Synthesis and metalation studies of thioamide-based SNS pincer by Elizabeth Grego, senior chemistry
    • Effect of chronic restraint stress on subsequent relapse to palatable food seeking induced by food-associated cues vs. re-exposure to palatable food by Erin Hagan, senior biology
    • The Effects of Beetle Infestation/Deforestation on Amphibian Communities in Assateague, VA by Shannon Bradley, senior environmental geoscience major
    • Operating Safely in the Cloud by Ireland Nelson, junior business administration information and technology management major
    • The Mental Health Issues and Needs of LGBTQ Prisoners in a Women’s State Prison by Megan Wissert, junior business administration finance major
    • Synthesis and Evaluation of Second-Generation Rhodium Pincer Ligands by Jacob Morris, senior chemistry major
    • The Moroccan Perception of Sub – Saharan Immigration by Facia Sirleaf, senior anthropology and communication studies major
    • Needs Assessment In Columbia County by Jacqueline Liss, senior sociology and psychology major
    • Knock Down of G-Protein-Gamma Subunits in CHO Cells by Glenn Maneval, senior biology major
    • The Relationship Between Vertical Jump and Body Composition in Children by Minke Pheiffer, senior exercise science major
    • Hacking Your Home with The Internet of Things by Zachary Prebosnyak, junor digital forensics major
    • An Investigation of Sex Differences in the Effects of Chronic Stress on Relapse to Palatable Food Seeking by Claire Pressimone, senior health sciences major
    • Assessment of Four Passive Limestone AMD Treatment Systems in Schuylkill County by Lauren Barrett, junior environmental geoscience major
    • The Health of the Nations: A Comparative Study of the French and US Healthcare Systems by Ellen Davis, senior nursing major
    • Living with Coal, Nuclear, and Natural Gas: Community Perspectives in Central Pennsylvania by Adrienne Tyler, junor anthropology
    • Determination of the Ion-Pairing Equilibrium Constants in Aqueous Lanthanum Chloride Solutions at High Temperatures and Pressures by Blake Durante, senior chemistry major
    • Use of the ultra-narrow 689 nm strontium transition for optical cooling to quantum degeneracy by Rachel Yenney, senior physics major
    • Chasing Turtles by Morgan Ruziecki, senior geography and planning major
    • Sociological Inquiry of Opioid Addiction Factors in NEPA Residents by Alexandria Martz, senior political science

    An adventurous path to their own classroom

    STEM Camps

    Emily Haskell saw a clear picture of her future as a teacher develop this summer. Nikita Loreman did as well. In fact, they discovered it together, sharing a classroom as part of Bloomsburg University’s Great STEM Adventure Camps that hosted more than 550 students from area schools.

    Soon the two education majors will have a classroom of their own.

    “My favorite part was seeing how the students take the task and make it their own in ways that I did not anticipate,” said Haskell, who is pursuing a master’s in mid-level education, adding her favorite activity was the Game Design Challenge. “I honestly did not know what the students would do with the random materials they were given. They devised some really clever games together I never would have dreamed up myself.”

    Throughout the course of the week the students — split into two different age groups — explored ways to grow their science, technical, engineering and math interests and abilities. The camps, which were coordinated by BU’s STEM Education Center, also investigated the arts.

    “At this time of year in a traditional classroom setting, students are usually at the verge of checking out of what they are learning in a classroom,” said Loreman, a senior early childhood education major. “They have just spent a lot of time and energy completing their 180 days of school. They are mentally exhausted. When you get these students out of their classroom and onto a college campus, they want to be involved, they want to participate, and they want to learn.”

    Each day focused on a different STEM theme. Specifically, the students enjoyed activities in art, biology, computers, engineering, math and technology led by BU students and faculty, as well as a few featured guest presenters.

    “(This camp experience) reminds me how important it is for students to have hands-on activities that go beyond the traditional learning experience,” Haskell said. “With all of the current technology students have at hand, this generation is used to being creators. As a teacher, I have to keep that in mind when designing lessons.”

    Haskell says the STEM week serves as a reminder there will always be successes and things that do not work out as well. The only failure is not to try, according to Haskell.

    “This week was a great opportunity for local students as many of the skills they will need to be global citizens, such as collaboration, inquisitiveness, and creativity, are fostered at the camp,” Haskell said. “It gave them the opportunity to do lots of hands-on, collaborative activities that they might not experience in the classroom.”

    According to Loreman, her favorite aspect of the week was the collaboration she had with fellow BU students and professors who helped with the camp.

    “As I grow in my educational career, I find that I love finding ways to assist my peers, obtain other professional opinions and ideas,” Loreman said. “And ultimately just share my love for teaching and learning with people that have a similar mindset.”

    In relation to the campers Loreman said she really enjoy seeing students find an activity or a particular topic that they fell in love with.

    “Some students (including us, as college students) often persuade themselves to dislike certain subjects when they get challenging,” Loreman said. “I love seeing the realization on students faces when they acknowledge that everything around them from their own bodies to nature is indeed science and math.”

    BU and Martz Technologies partner on high school STEM competition

    Focusing on “Improving Pennsylvania through Water: STEM in Action,” Bloomsburg University’s Regional STEM Education Center will team with Martz Technologies to host the first Bloomsburg Fair STEM Competition in conjunction with the Bloomsburg Fair Association and the Central Susquehanna Community Foundation. The competition is open to participating STEM Magnet high schools.

    Each school will be allowed one team of five students. Teams will research, present and design a project this is capable of improving the quality of life for Pennsylvanians by incorporating water. Teams will be provided a $250 stipend to help cover the cost of supplies needed to build their project. Students will present their project and explain the practical applications of their device to a panel of distinguished judges from industries, academia and government.

    Projects from all participating teams will be exhibited in the Technology Building at the Bloomsburg Fair during fair week. A significant cash award will be given to the school with the winning project to support its STEM program.

    Regional STEM Education Center receives PPL grant

    Bloomsburg University's Regional STEM Education Center received a $25,000 grant from the PPL Foundation. The funds will support the GI-STEM: Girls in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Day for regional Girl Scouts and the Great STEM Adventure Camps at Bloomsburg University.

    GI-STEM Day encourages Girl Scouts in Brownies (second and third grades), Juniors (fourth and fifth grades), and Cadettes (sixth-eighth grades) to get excited about the STEM field. The day, designed to teach girls how to enjoy both learning about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and be very successful in school in STEM subjects. During the program, Girl Scouts move through hands-on STEM stations facilitated by Bloomsburg University education and nursing majors to learn about STEM principles. Also, the Girl Scouts will hear from female STEM speakers and have presentations from Mad Science of Lehigh Valley and Chesapeake Bay Field Research Station.

    The STEM Adventure Camps provide an avenue for students going into grades 5-10 to develop their science, technical, engineering, and math interests and abilities. The three camps provide different experiences. The Explorers camp explores the environment and our interaction with it every day through the exploration of environmental, geographical, and geological sciences. The Investigators camp provides students an opportunity to learn about the biological sciences through experiments and dissections. Finally, the Innovators camp offers a chance to develop technical skills and interests in the world of computers by experimenting with computer forensics, coding, and encryption, and study computer programming. All campers also participate in STEM activities each afternoon.

    Trustees name new residence hall in honor of Soltz

    Soltz Hall

    Bloomsburg University’s Council of Trustees approved naming the university’s new residence hall in honor of retiring President David L. Soltz at their meeting in June. The Trustees also recommended and approved President Emeritus status for Soltz, who steps down on July 7.

    The seven-story, $61 million residence hall featuring 138 suite-style apartments, will open in August.

    When construction is completed for the Fall of 2017, the 163,000-square-foot-structure will house nearly 400 students in 11 single, 37 double, 39 triple and 48 quad configurations. The building's first floor will feature the University Store, Mail Services and two nationally known restaurants, Chick-fil-A and Qdoba Mexican Eats.

    New residence hall brings ‘wow’ factor

    An external gathering space with a fire pit. A second-story outdoor plaza. Two lounges on every floor. And a “green” roof with sustainable, low-maintenance plants. Just a few of the “wow” factors built into plans for Bloomsburg University’s new residence hall, set to open in August 2017 at the site of the former University Store Building.

    Demolition of the University Store Building began in January 2016, after the store relocated to Kehr Union, Mailroom Services moved to Elwell Hall and the BU Police Department began operating out of new headquarters at the rear of Andruss Library. Construction of the university’s first, intentional multi-use building will be completed by August 2017, in time for the hall’s first 398 residents to move in.

    The new residence hall is expected to significantly reduce the number of freshmen who are “tripled” each fall. The as-yet-unnamed hall will feature services for the entire campus community. The University Store and two new dining venues will be located on the ground floor; the mailroom and an integrative learning center for tutorial services and the university writing center will be found on the first floor.

    The new dining venues, selected from Aramark’s portfolio of national brands, are Chick-fil-A and Qdoba. Market studies showed there was an unmet demand for non-meal plan dining options offering quality food at a reasonable cost. Both quick food restaurants will accept payment in flex dollars, Husky Gold, cash or credit cards.

    President David L. Soltz

    David L. Soltz, Ph.D., became BU's 18th president in January 2008 after serving as provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Central Washington University.

    Since arriving at Bloomsburg, Soltz has concentrated on building programs and infrastructure for today’s students and those who will follow. The university’s strategic plan, Impact 2015: Building on the Past, Leading for the Future, was developed in fall 2010 under his leadership and updated as Impact 2017.

    Congrats to the Class of 2017!

    Nearly 1,500 graduates received diplomas during ceremonies Saturday in Nelson Field House for the Zeigler College of Business, College of Education, College of Science and Technology and the College of Liberal Arts. Students who earned the highest grade-point average in each college were recognized. The top honor graduates were:

  • College of Education — Lauren Danielle Frick, Bachelor of Science in education in special education (PK-8)/elementary education (PK-4) with an emphasis in language and fine arts.
  • College of Liberal Arts — Nadine DeJesus, Bachelor of Arts in mass communications with an emphasis in telecommunications; Katlyn Marie Rowe, Bachelor of Arts in psychology, minor in anthropology; Jessa Wood, Bachelor of Arts in philosophy and Bachelor of Arts in political science and minor in Spanish.
  • College of Science and Technology — Alexandra Smith, Bachelor of Science in nursing.
  • Zeigler College of Business — Caleb Jackson, Bachelor of Science in business administration in accounting and Bachelor of Science in business administration in finance; Kristen Odor, Bachelor of Science in business administration in accounting.

More than 150 graduate students received master's or doctoral degrees Friday in Haas Center for the Arts during the commencement ceremony for the College of Graduate Studies.

Anthropology honor society inducts new members

Anthropology Honors Society

Lambda Alpha National Honor Society in Anthropology, Zeta chapter of Pennsylvania inducted 22 students of anthropology on Friday, May 5, in the Schweiker Room of Andruss Library.

Bloomsburg University's chapter recognized BU President David Soltz with an honor society tie pin on his retirement and our featured faculty presenter was Damien Marken, who highlighted student participation in the summer 2016 and upcoming summer 2017 archaeological project of the GeoOntological Development Society, Jerry Glick and the Waka’ Research Foundation, and Proyecto Arqueologico Waka’ (PAW).

Also recognized were students Kristi Gift and Erika Maxson, student researchers on the Waka’ Research Project, who were selected as the 2017 Lambda Alpha Zeta Honor Society Outstanding Seniors. Facia Sirleaf and Michael Hollar were announced as winners of the 2017 Wymer and Warner Anthropology Scholarship. The scholarship will support Facia researching ethnicity and race this summer in Morocco and Michael studying Ukrainian at Harvard University.

Select high school art exhibited on campus

High School Art Exhibit

After reviewing high school student portfolios, Bloomsburg University's Department of Art and Art History is holding an exhibition of selected student work in the Haas Gallery of Art. The show opens on Tuesday, May 9, with a closing reception on Wednesday, May 24, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. with awards presented to the juried students.

The following students have been selected for this year’s exhibition:

  • Danville — Brooke Kester, Mikayla Wright, Erin Clarke, Madi Vastine, Reece Lopatka and Rainey Oldfield
  • Garden Spot — Leanna Canull
  • Lewisburg — Jenna Thomas, Julia Thomas, Michael Permyashkin and Ja’Amir Brown
  • Milton — Megan Snyder
  • Selinsgrove — Jenna Eberly, Mara Marius, Chris Kalich, Brandon Walter, Dan Dan He and Amelia Will
  • Southern Columbia — Jessica Derk

Senior’s research on PBIS showcased at state forum

Ashley Smith

According to the U.S. Department of Education, more than 60 percent of first-time teachers say they’re not sufficiently prepared to face the challenge of addressing the social and emotional needs of today’s students in tandem with achieving academic learning outcomes.

Ashley Smith, a senior early childhood and special education major, will not be one of them.

The soon-to-be graduate has spent the past two years as a Fellow with Bloomsburg University’s McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support, where she has been focused on researching positive behavioral interventions. Her work will be showcased next week statewide at the 2017 PA PBIS Implementers’ Forum. She is the first BU undergraduate ever to do so, according to Timothy Knoster, Ed.D., executive director of the McDowell Institute and professor of exceptionality programs.

Business students advance in national bank competition

Bank Case Study Competition

Bloomsburg University is one of 33 schools competing in the 2017 Community Bank Case Study Competition sponsored by the Conference of State Bank Supervisors (CSBS). CSBS is a nationwide organization of banking regulators that supervises state-chartered financial institutions.

BU's team is comprised of Keegan Carl, Michael Mintzer, Vicki Yackiel, Austin Golden, Kristopher Gross and videographer Benjamin Staub.

The competition, which is open to undergraduate students in all fields of study, is an opportunity for students to gain valuable knowledge of the banking industry, and to build an understanding of the opportunities and challenges facing today’s community banks. In addition to financial analysis of a community bank, each year CSBS identifies an area of concern for case analysis.

For its submission, the BU team collaborated with First Keystone Community Bank of Berwick. The team conducted a case study, wrote a comprehensive 25-page report, and prepared a 10-minute video that highlighted the teams’ case study findings while showcasing the partnered community bank. All the work, including the video, had to be prepared by students. A year ago, BU was one of 12 national finalists in the competition.

Chemistry research gets Golden Gate spotlight

Blake Durante

From walking the Golden Gate Bridge to speaking in front of the science community, Bloomsburg University chemistry majors Blake Durante and Olivia Fry had an experience of a lifetime in San Francisco this spring.

They were among more than 8,000 research presentations at the 253rd American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition on Advanced Materials, Technologies, and Systems and Processes that also featured more than 300 exhibitors.

Durante and Fry received approval through the American Chemical Society to present at the conference. Durante presented his research, “Determination of Different Properties of Lanthanum Chlorides in Aqueous Solutions.” He had been working on the research for two semesters and presenting it was a requirement of the courses.

“This gave me experience presenting my research,” Durante said. “It also allowed me to network with companies that were there as well as possible graduate schools.”

SLP students present master thesis defenses

Centennial Hall

The following Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology students will be presenting their thesis defenses on Thursday, May 11, in Centennial Hall, Room 301. The public is invited to attend.

  • 10 a.m. — Carly Aaron, “Relations Between Preschoolers’ Vocabulary, Syntax, and Exposure to Literacy, and Their Phonological Awareness Abilities”
  • 11 a.m. — Eric Smith, “Exploring the Intra-Subject Variability of the Second Formant Transition Protocol within the Motor Speech Profile”
  • Noon — Kate Serravalle, “The Effects of Verbal Instructions and Lip Strength Measures on Sip Size Between Young and Older Adults During Straw Drinking Tasks”
  • 1 p.m. — Gary Gartling, “Exploring The Intra-Subject Variability and Tremor & Intonation Stimulability Protocols within the Motor Speech Profile”
  • 2 p.m. — Laura Koscis, “Exploring Intra-Subject Variability for Diadochokinetic Rate in English Speakers using the Motor Speech Profile”
  • 3 p.m. — Carly Schoenstein, “Relations between Parents’ Reported Book Reading And Literacy Activity Frequency And Preschoolers’ Vocabulary And Phonological Awareness Skills”

One step closer to graduation

One step closer for these Class of 2017 members as they were honored this week during the First World Graduation Ceremony by Bloomsburg University’s Office of Multicultural Affairs.

The bi-annual First World ceremony is celebrated each December and May to congratulate the achievements — academic and leadership roles — of BU’s multicultural students at the baccalaureate and graduate degree levels. This class was among the largest ever, according to Madelyn Rodriguez, director of the Multicultural Center.

First World Honorees — Diona Brown, Beverly Andre, Shantel Robinson, Lakira White, Nadine De Jesus, Danielle Kennedy, Jamar Smith, Farida Saka, Ashley Veney, Tasha Jenkins, Rmell Robinson, Daryl Gatewood, Jasmine Davis, Mya Pipkin, Christina Williams, Dyamond Robinson, Miranda Carrasquillo, Timothy Rowe-Golden, Kahlil Daniel, Shakor Presley, Hadiyah Grove, Dahiyah Green, Shaidy Moronta, Andy Figaro, Kadijah Brookins, Kahdeejah Cook, Daniel Adams, Kyohn Page, Brianna Rae Johns, Chliyah Twyman, Makeda Nelson, Lindsi Wilson, James Smalll, Shaquel Elam and Kurk Thompson.

EGGS major lands competitive internship

Keara Drummer

Paleontology isn’t a typical career track for an environmental geoscience major, but that’s not stopping Keara Drummer from testing the waters this summer at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Drummer, a junior, will be among the select few interning to help curators on the Royal Mapes Collection — a scientific collection of over 500,000 fossil specimens, mostly from the Upper Paleozoic of the central United States. She was one of six chosen for this highly competitive eight-week internship.

“It became a target because the internship does basically what I’ve been doing helping organize the EGGS paleo collection, except on a larger more professional scale,” Drummer said. “I enjoy the nature of the job, and I’m up for the bigger challenge. I’ve always had a fascination for museums as a kid.”

Fulbright Scholar makes history

Alexandra Miller

Becoming a Fulbright Scholar has been a dream of Alexandra Miller's since high school. This summer the Bloomsburg University senior languages and cultures major will get to live her dream when she travels to Argentina as part of the Fulbright Scholar program.

After thinking about what she wanted to do after graduation and what she’s passionate about Miller started the application process. Miller, the first BU student to be a Fulbright Scholar, was naturally thrilled when she learned she was selected.

“I couldn't believe my eyes when I received the email,” Miller says. “I know that this once in a lifetime opportunity that will change my life for the better and will teach me lessons few people are lucky enough to learn in a lifetime. It is always an incredibly rewarding feeling when you achieve something you have worked so hard and long on.”

Seniors obtain CAD certification

CAD Certification

The following 17 students earned Certified SOLIDWORKS Associate (CSWA) certificates as the culmination of their CAD Engineering Graphics course in Spring 2017, taught by Nathaniel Greene. A three-hour examination tested students’ ability to make three-dimensional computer models of mechanical parts and assemblies. SOLIDWORKS is the industry-leading CAD software. CSWA is a global exam that is given in 12 languages, and Bloomsburg University is an official test site.

Vincent Barbati, Computer Science; Caleb Bridi, Electronics Engineering Technology (EET); Vincenzo Bucanelli, EET; Edson Castillo, EET; James Catarroja, EET / Physics; Luke Derstine, EET; Vrunda Desai, EET; Ty-nia Dorsey, EET; Spencer Dunkle, Engineering Science; Miguel George, EET; William Hogan, Digital Forensics; Cameron Lu, Engineering Science; Mitchell McLeod, Engineering Science; Dylan Mellinger, EET; Emily Mottern, EET; Daniel Nguyen, Engineering Science; and Kyle Sisco, EET.

Anthropology honor society inducts new members

Anthropology Honors Society

Lambda Alpha National Honor Society in Anthropology, Zeta chapter of Pennsylvania inducted 22 students of anthropology on Friday, May 5, in the Schweiker Room of Andruss Library.

Bloomsburg University's chapter recognized BU President David Soltz with an honor society tie pin on his retirement and our featured faculty presenter was Damien Marken, who highlighted student participation in the summer 2016 and upcoming summer 2017 archaeological project of the GeoOntological Development Society, Jerry Glick and the Waka’ Research Foundation, and Proyecto Arqueologico Waka’ (PAW).

Also recognized were students Kristi Gift and Erika Maxson, student researchers on the Waka’ Research Project, who were selected as the 2017 Lambda Alpha Zeta Honor Society Outstanding Seniors. Facia Sirleaf and Michael Hollar were announced as winners of the 2017 Wymer and Warner Anthropology Scholarship. The scholarship will support Facia researching ethnicity and race this summer in Morocco and Michael studying Ukrainian at Harvard University.

Graduating art students showcase work downtown

Senior Art Exit Show

Bloomsburg University’s Department of Art and Art History is holding its Senior Exit Spring Show for its graduating seniors at the Greenly Center through May 12. A reception featuring student artists presenting their exhibits and artist statements officially kicked off the show last week.

  • Art Studio: Michael Brown, Lisa Everswick, Breanna Faull, Devon Haywood, Nicholas Heberling, Krystal James, Sarah Kulaga, Michael Maletesta, Sandi McMinn, Kristin Nalesnik, Wanda Riley, Chris Russo, Ashley Sanchez, Katelyn Shea, Katie Starliper, Fawn Tomlinson and Jonathan Woll.
  • Art History Janet Berger and Wanda Riley.

Select high school art exhibited on campus

After reviewing high school student portfolios, Bloomsburg University's Department of Art and Art History is holding an exhibition of selected student work in the Haas Gallery of Art. The show opens on Tuesday, May 9, with a closing reception on Wednesday, May 24, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. with awards presented to the juried students.

The following students have been selected for this year’s exhibition:

  • Danville — Brooke Kester, Mikayla Wright, Erin Clarke, Madi Vastine, Reece Lopatka and Rainey Oldfield
  • Garden Spot — Leanna Canull
  • Lewisburg — Jenna Thomas, Julia Thomas, Michael Permyashkin and Ja’Amir Brown
  • Milton — Megan Snyder
  • Selinsgrove — Jenna Eberly, Mara Marius, Chris Kalich, Brandon Walter, Dan Dan He and Amelia Will
  • Southern Columbia — Jessica Derk

Soil Judging team competes on national stage

Soil Judging Team

Bloomsburg University's Soil Judging team finished fifth last week in the group portion of the national soil judging competition hosted by Northern Illinois University. Professor Matthew Ricker’s team was fifth in the country in the event where the whole team works collaboratively on a pit, asking each other questions before coming to a consensus and turning in their answers.

BU advanced to the nationals by winning the Northeast Regional Collegiate Soil Judging Contest at Pennsylvania State University this past fall in just the team’s second year of competition. The winning team — BU took two teams of students to regionals — will test their talents on the national level on April 23 to 28 at Northern Illinois University, host of the National Soil Judging Contest. Joining Sullivan and O’Rourke will be fellow students Daniel Steinhauser, Morgan Sandritter, Josh Prezkop, and Eric Franz.

In nationals, BU competed against several larger schools with established soil judging programs such as University of Maryland, West Virginia University, Virginia Tech, and Kansas State.

First Quality Products recruits business students

First Quality Group

Several staff members from First Quality Products, Inc., recently came to campus to recruit students from the Bloomsburg University supply chain management major in the Zeigler College of Business.

First Quality, Inc., is a family of companies that manufacture paper products facilities in Hazleton, Lewistown, McElhattan, King of Prussia, Lock Haven, Anderson, S.C., Macon, Ga., and China. There the company produces toilet tissue, bottled water and absorbent hygiene products (everything from baby diapers and wipes to feminine hygiene products to adult incontinence products).

Those who came to campus from First Quality included Robb Lillibridge, who oversees four manufacturing plants for First Quality. His division focuses on absorbent hygiene products. Also, Michele Edwards who is the human resources manager for the area. In addition, Melissa Viemeister who is in charge of campus recruiting, attended from their main office, while Sarah Geise, ’13, M’14, who is working at First Quality as a demand planning analyst.

Nursing majors advocate in Harrisburg

Nursing Advocacy

More than 70 senior nursing majors and six nursing faculty recently participated in legislative and policy advocacy in Harrisburg.

Students met with representatives from the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association (PSNA) to discuss the state legislative lobbying process and the nurse’s role in impacting clients and the profession.

PSNA Chief Executive Officer Betsy Snook and PSNA Director of Government Affairs Keven Busher offered real-life roundtable discussions surrounding current legislative priorities, such as safe staffing and registered nurse delegation.

Students met with Senator John Gordner (R-27th) and Karen Coates, chief of staff to Speaker of the House Turzai.

To end the day, Sen. Gordner gave a guided tour of the Capitol Building and discussed his support for nurses and student nurses in his district and across the state.

Australia scholarships and fellowships

Australian Scholarships

The 2018 Australia Awards–Endeavour Scholarships and Fellowships are now open for applications.

These awards are the Australian Government’s competitive, merit-based scholarships and fellowships providing opportunities for Australians to undertake study, research, or professional development overseas and for overseas citizens to do the same in Australia. There are five awards available for participants in the U.S. The Endeavour Scholarships and Fellowships build Australia’s reputation for excellence in the provision of education and research, support the internationalization of the Australian higher education and research sectors, and offer high-achieving Australians opportunities to increase their knowledge and expertise in their field. Deadline to apply is Friday, June 30.

Gearing up for commencement

Bloomsburg University will hold three undergraduate commencement ceremonies this spring. Nearly 1,500 graduates will receive diplomas during the ceremonies Saturday, May 13, on BU’s Academic Quadrangle. The first ceremony will begin at 8:30 a.m. for the 373 graduates of the Zeigler College of Business and 150 graduates from the College of Education. Commencement for the 459 graduates of the College of Science and Technology will be held at noon, with the final ceremony for the 553 graduates of the College of Liberal Arts beginning at 3:30 p.m.

Spring Commencement
Graduation Webstream

The students who earned the highest grade-point average in each college will be recognized. The top honor graduates are:

  • College of Education — Lauren Danielle Frick Mercersburg, Bachelor of Science in education in special education (PK-8)/elementary education (PK-4) with an emphasis in language and fine arts.     
  • College of Liberal Arts — Nadine DeJesus, Allentown, Bachelor of Arts in mass communications with an emphasis in telecommunications; Katlyn Marie Rowe, Pen Argyl, Bachelor of Arts in psychology, minor in anthropology; Jessa Wood, Orangeville, Bachelor of Arts in philosophy and Bachelor of Arts in political science and minor in Spanish.
  • College of Science and Technology — Alexandra Smith, Bloomsburg, Bachelor of Science in nursing.
  • Zeigler College of Business — Caleb Jackson, Enola, Bachelor of Science in business administration in accounting and Bachelor of Science in business administration in finance; Kristen Odor, Alburtis, Bachelor of Science in business administration in accounting.

Bloomsburg University announces commencement speakers at the school’s 148th Commencement ceremony on May 13. Frank T. Brogan, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education; Cole Camplese, ’96 M.S, chief information officer (CIO) and associate vice president at the University of Chicago; and Cynthia Shapira, chair of the Board of Governors will address the graduates at ceremonies to be held on the Academic Quadrangle.

  • Brogan will speak to the graduates of the Zeigler College of Business and the College of Education at 8:30 a.m. Brogan became the fourth chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education on Oct. 1, 2013.
  • Camplese will speak to the graduates of the College of Science and Technology at noon. Camplese is the associate vice president for information technology and chief information officer at the University of Chicago.
  • Shapira will speak to the graduates of the College of Liberal Arts at 3:30 p.m. Shapira is president of the Shapira Foundation and a community activist.

First Quality Products recruits business students

First Quality Group

Several staff members from First Quality Products, Inc., recently came to campus to recruit students from the Bloomsburg University supply chain management major in the Zeigler College of Business.

First Quality, Inc., is a family of companies that manufacture paper products facilities in Hazleton, Lewistown, McElhattan, King of Prussia, Lock Haven, Anderson, S.C., Macon, Ga., and China. There the company produces toilet tissue, bottled water and absorbent hygiene products (everything from baby diapers and wipes to feminine hygiene products to adult incontinence products).

Those who came to campus from First Quality included Robb Lillibridge, who oversees four manufacturing plants for First Quality. His division focuses on absorbent hygiene products. Also, Michele Edwards who is the human resources manager for the area. In addition, Melissa Viemeister who is in charge of campus recruiting, attended from their main office, while Sarah Geise, ’13, M’14, who is working at First Quality as a demand planning analyst.

FOCUS helps celebrate graduates with campus visit

Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia, for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, May 7, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and blessings of the Class of 2017.

Through culturally relevant activities and events, and biblical discipleship F.O.C.U.S. promotes Godly unity amongst young adults. In addition to activities and events such as F.O.C.U.S Friday (monthly Bible Study) and “Keeping it 100” (a group meeting and safe space for young adult men). F.O.C.U.S is also actively involved in community service and outreach initiatives.

Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods, coordinator of minority affairs, at 570-389-4091 for details.

Anchor Program aids foster children

Centennial Hall

Children aging-out of the foster care system are more likely to end up unemployed or worse yet, in prison, within five years according to numerous studies. A new Bloomsburg University initiative, the Anchor Program, aims to engage youth, ages 15-18, to help change those statistics.

The Anchor Program will give children in the foster care program a chance to explore their academic interests and talents through a multi-year summer residential college life experience program and year-round mentorship opportunities. The inaugural session of the program is scheduled for July 15 to 22.

Anchor Crew Leaderapplications will be accepted until 11:59 p.m. Thursday, May 11, and decisions/notifications made by Wednesday, May 17. Room and Board will be covered for the period of work (July 14 to 22). Training will be provided (July 14 to 15). This is an excellent opportunity for students to show off and build their leadership skills, facilitate Student Life activities, and participate in academic workshops with faculty.

Literature class takes in NYC art exhibits

European Literature

This spring, Christina Francis took her European Literature I class to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Onassis Cultural Center in New York City. This trip consisted of viewing Greek and Roman art exhibits and the European Galleries, along with a new exhibit entitled, “A World of Emotions: Ancient Greece, 700 B.C. to 200 A.D.” at the Onassis Cultural Center.

This exhibit was a special treat, according Francis, associate professor of English, because it is only being displayed until June 24.

Before making the trip, the students received a guest lecture from Deborah Walberg, assistant professor of art and art history, on the development of Greek statuary from impact of the earlier Egyptians, to its influence on Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. Students were told to focus on artifacts that would help them develop a research project on a myth or character of their choosing from among the course’s texts.

Though, many students had difficulty choosing one specific artifact, since each and every one was incredibly unique. Clayton Newton, a sophomore English and secondary education major, was especially awestruck.

“In the Museum of Art it’s hard to stay focused on the Greek art exhibits, because every time you turn your head there is some amazing artifact that pulls you into another room,” Newton said. “What truly became easier was respecting the sculptures and realizing that the naked woman in front of the Andruss Library has nothing on the high quality sculptures of the Greeks.”

Research showcased at national education conference

SITE Conference

A trio of Bloomsburg University faculty representing the College of Education and College of Science and Technology presented research at the 28th annual SITE conference-Society for Information Technology and Education this spring in Austin, Texas.

SITE promotes the development and dissemination of theoretical knowledge, conceptual research, and professional practice knowledge through its conference, books, collaborative projects with other organizations, and the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education.

At the conference, the faculty presented:

  • Lynn Hummel, assistant professor of instructional technology — “Pokémon Go for learning: A gamification approach,” which explored methods to learn ways in which Pokémon Go can be transformed into educational lessons on the topics of science, math, and geography.
  • Beth Rogowsky, assistant professor of teaching and learning, and Caryn Terwilliger, assistant professor of teaching and learning — “The Effect of Tech Time in Preschool: A Randomized Controlled Study,” which explored the controversy over the use of technology with our youngest learners. Are computers replacing time children can be learning through play?

Honor Society places in national competition

Phi Omega Pi

Bloomsburg University's chapter of Pi Omega Pi recently placed fifth nationally at the honor society’s national competition in Chicago. Pi Omega Pi is the National Business Education Teacher Honor Society, which has promoted scholarship and service in the area of business education for more than 80 years.

Prior to the national competition, each chapter was required to complete three projects-local, state and national related to furthering the profession. The BU chapter redesigned the national website, volunteered at the Pennsylvania Business Education Annual Conference and served as conference assistants at the PA Future Business Leaders of America State Leadership Conference. In addition, students presented a workshop on "Active Learning."

Professors Christina Force and Maggie O’Connor, advisors to the group, also saw the BU chapter win the Participation Award for being the most active chapter at the competition, the only attending to receive the honor.

Anthropology shines at annual PASSHE conference

Anthropology Conference

Seven anthropology students presented original anthropological research at the annual PASSHE conference at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Students, accompanied by faculty members, Faith Warner and Damien Marken presented on topics ranging from Maya archaeology to Syrian refugees, museum anthropology, the anthropology of sports, Chicano ethnicity, immigration issues, Russian language acquisition, and gender issues in video games. Student travel was supported by a College of Liberal Arts Student Professional Development Grant.

  • Gender-bent: Women’s Role Reversal in Video Games, Megan Rice
  • The Impact of Religion on Welcoming Syrian Refugees in the United States: An Ethnography of Denial, Debate, and Dissonance, Megan Shay
  • This is the End: The fall of the polychrome tradition at the Maya city of El Peru -Waka’, Emily Haney
  • Classic Maya Urban Hydrology: GIS Analysis of the Site El Perú-Waka’, Erika Maxson
  • The Disappearance of the Fieldtrip: An Ethnographic Study of the Effects of Museums and Cultural Experiences on the Learning Process of Children, Emily Haney
  • What Gets You Going? An Ethnographic Study on the Relationships between Motivation and Performance in a University Sport, Amber Wilson
  • “Tengo mi propria historia” The Mexican and Mexican-American Experience in the United States since the 2016 Election, Theodora Baranowski and Alexis Mendoza
  • Learning Russian Made Difficult or Easy, Michael Hollar

Model EU wins award at spring simulation

Andruss Library

Bloomsburg University’s Model European Union attended a sponsored simulation this spring by the University of Pittsburgh where two students brought home the Best Delegate Award.

Nathan Copenhaver, a junior business and economics major, and Shyer Amin, a senior business and economics major, were awarded the 2017 best delegates.

“MEU is a simulation of contemporary real life problems and issues that the world faces today,” Amin said. “First, it makes me informed about things that are happening around the world. Second, it greatly improved my articulation and debate skills. It is important in life to speak persuasively and also eloquently.”

MEU brings people and experiences together for all over. People put aside their differences and achieve a common goal. According to Amin, achieving these experiences and making new connections is some of the benefits of being a part of MEU.

Trustees narrow presidential search field

Academic Quad

Bloomsburg University’s Council of Trustees voted unanimously today to advance presidential candidates Bashar W. Hanna, Ph.D. and Daniel A. Wubah, Ph.D. to the Chancellor and the Pennsylvania State System Board of Governors.

The Trustees made their unranked selection during a special meeting Wednesday, April 26. The process will continue on May 8 and 9 when the Chancellor and PASSHE Board of Governors will interview the candidates in Harrisburg. Bloomsburg University’s next president will be named during a special PA State System of Higher Education Board of Governors meeting that will be held later in May.

From a field of more than 55 applicants, Hanna and Wubah, along with two other candidates, were invited to visit BU earlier this spring for three-day interviews with the campus community.

  • Hanna is a professor of biology and formerly vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Delaware Valley University in Doylestown. Prior to working at Delaware Valley, Hanna served as associate provost at Ithaca College in Ithaca, N.Y. He was dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, where he served as interim provost.
  • Wubah is the senior advisor to the president at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va. He joined the Washington and Lee administration after his tenure at Virginia Tech where he served as vice president for undergraduate education and deputy provost. At Washington and Lee he was appointed chief academic officer with oversight of two undergraduate colleges and the Law School.
    • President David L. Soltz will retire June 30 after a tenure of nearly 10 years. The new leader will assume his presidency on or around July 1.

      CGA hosts President Soltz send-off

      President David Soltz

      Students are invited to celebrate President David Soltz retirement party on Tuesday, April 25, from 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Lycoming Lawn and the Scranton Commons Dining Hall Amphitheater.

      The event will have activities for the students including walking tacos, airbrush tattoos, a caricature artist, and a photo booth. There will also be a special performance from the Bloomsburg University Cheerleaders. President Soltz will arrive at 6 p.m. to meet with students and say his farewells.

      Since arriving at BU, Soltz has concentrated on building programs and infrastructure for today’s students and those who will follow. The university’s strategic plan, Impact 2015: Building on the Past, Leading for the Future, was developed in fall 2010 under his leadership and updated as Impact 2017. As a result of the strategic plan, numerous academic programs and initiatives were established, largely focusing on experiential learning. A new General Education model, MyCore, was designed to enhance learning opportunities for all students and to prepare them for success in an increasingly complex global environment.

      Honors seniors present independent study projects

      Honors Independent Study

      The past four years for senior Honors Program students had lead up to their final presentation of their independent research projects. The Honors Independent Study consists of three courses dedicated to research and a year to work alongside a faculty mentor in their field to complete an original research project. Their final work is culminated into a written project, that is open to submission for publication, and an oral presentation that is open to the campus community. Presentations are in the Honors classroom in Luzerne Hall, Room B-9.

      • Tuesday, April 25 at 2 p.m. - Bryan Semon, Laser Beam Profiling with a Smartphone Camera with Ju Xin
      • Tuesday, April 25 at 2:45 p.m. - Steve Vajdic, Profiling a TeachSpin Infrared Laser with Ju Xin
      • Wednesday, April 26 at 4:15 p.m. - Evan Simpson, Product Placement Brands and their Influence on Young Adult Consumers with Kenneth Hall
      • Thursday, April 26 at 2 p.m. - Natalie Roessner, Altering Personalities through Proper Management with Steven Welch
      • Thursday, April 26 at Ellen King, Factors Associated with Disproportionality of Minority Students Receiving Specialized Education Services: A Literature Review with Brooke Lylo
      • Tuesday, May 2 at 2 p.m. - Grace Schueren, Mastery of English Fricatives and Affricates by Spanish-English Speaking Dual Language Learners with Shelley Scarpino
      • Tuesday, May 2 at 2:45 p.m. - Amy Dobson, Percentage of Occurrence of the 8 Most Common Phonological Processes in Bilingual Spanish-English Speaking Children with Shelley Scarpino
      • Wednesday, May 3 at 1 p.m. - Clarissa Hoke, We’re All Getting Old: Interprofessional Undergraduate Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults with Lori Metzger
      • Thursday, May 4 at 1:15 p.m. - Hanan Ben Nacef, Sedentary Lifestyles Leading to Exercise Induced Hypernea and Tachycardia in University Students with Candice Klingerman
      • Thursday, May 4 at 2 p.m. - Morgan Munyan, Age Variation in American Sign Language with Jessica Bentley
      • Thursday, May 4 at 3:30 p.m. - Emily Broadbent, Adoption of a Mouse Model to Study Malignant Melanoma with Angela Hess

      Senior Exit Spring Show

      Senior Art Exit Show

      Bloomsburg University’s Department of Art and Art History is holding its Senior Exit Spring Show for its graduating seniors at the Greenly Center through May 12. A reception featuring student artists presenting their exhibits and artist statements will be held Wednesday, April 26, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

      • Art Studio: Michael Brown, Lisa Everswick, Breanna Faull, Devon Haywood, Nicholas Heberling, Krystal James, Sarah Kulaga, Michael Maletesta, Sandi McMinn, Kristin Nalesnik, Wanda Riley, Chris Russo, Ashley Sanchez, Katelyn Shea, Katie Starliper, Fawn Tomlinson and Jonathan Woll.
      • Art History Janet Berger and Wanda Riley.

      39th Annual Renaissance Jamboree

      Renaissance Jamboree

      Live music, homemade baked goods, carnival cuisine, game booths, children’s shows, trampoline acts and dance performances are all lined up for the 39th Annual Renaissance Jamboree on Saturday, April 29, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

      The outdoor festival hosts food stands from local non-profits, regional non-profit, and fundraisers for the local community. Along with hundreds of booths and activities available. Pony Party Paradise will be offering pony rides for a small fee, on market street. Backyard Bouncin’ will have two inflatable rides for a small fee, at Main and West streets. There will also be a live Ninja Turtle Show, Cloggers, and Zumba.

      Free parking at the fairgrounds with handicap-accessible buses running all day. Handicapped parking is behind the Bloomsburg Public Library. Columbia Montour Area Chamber of Commerce, Bloomsburg University and its Program Board, Town of Bloomsburg, Renaissance Jamboree Committee, and Downtown Bloomsburg Inc. co-sponsor this event for the past 39 years.

      Trustees narrow presidential search field

      Academic Quad

      Bloomsburg University’s Council of Trustees voted unanimously today to advance presidential candidates Bashar W. Hanna, Ph.D. and Daniel A. Wubah, Ph.D. to the Chancellor and the Pennsylvania State System Board of Governors.

      The Trustees made their unranked selection during a special meeting Wednesday, April 26. The process will continue on May 8 and 9 when the Chancellor and PASSHE Board of Governors will interview the candidates in Harrisburg. Bloomsburg University’s next president will be named during a special PA State System of Higher Education Board of Governors meeting that will be held later in May.

      From a field of more than 55 applicants, Hanna and Wubah, along with two other candidates, were invited to visit BU earlier this spring for three-day interviews with the campus community.

      • Hanna is a professor of biology and formerly vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Delaware Valley University in Doylestown. Prior to working at Delaware Valley, Hanna served as associate provost at Ithaca College in Ithaca, N.Y. He was dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, where he served as interim provost.
      • Wubah is the senior advisor to the president at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va. He joined the Washington and Lee administration after his tenure at Virginia Tech where he served as vice president for undergraduate education and deputy provost. At Washington and Lee he was appointed chief academic officer with oversight of two undergraduate colleges and the Law School.
        • Honors seniors present independent study projects

          Honors Independent Study

          The past four years for senior Honors Program students had lead up to their final presentation of their independent research projects. The Honors Independent Study consists of three courses dedicated to research and a year to work alongside a faculty mentor in their field to complete an original research project. Their final work is culminated into a written project, that is open to submission for publication, and an oral presentation that is open to the campus community. Presentations are in the Honors classroom in Luzerne Hall, Room B-9.

          • Tuesday, April 25 at 2 p.m. - Bryan Semon, Laser Beam Profiling with a Smartphone Camera with Ju Xin
          • Tuesday, April 25 at 2:45 p.m. - Steve Vajdic, Profiling a TeachSpin Infrared Laser with Ju Xin
          • Wednesday, April 26 at 4:15 p.m. - Evan Simpson, Product Placement Brands and their Influence on Young Adult Consumers with Kenneth Hall
          • Thursday, April 26 at 2 p.m. - Natalie Roessner, Altering Personalities through Proper Management with Steven Welch
          • Thursday, April 26 at Ellen King, Factors Associated with Disproportionality of Minority Students Receiving Specialized Education Services: A Literature Review with Brooke Lylo
          • Tuesday, May 2 at 2 p.m. - Grace Schueren, Mastery of English Fricatives and Affricates by Spanish-English Speaking Dual Language Learners with Shelley Scarpino
          • Tuesday, May 2 at 2:45 p.m. - Amy Dobson, Percentage of Occurrence of the 8 Most Common Phonological Processes in Bilingual Spanish-English Speaking Children with Shelley Scarpino
          • Wednesday, May 3 at 1 p.m. - Clarissa Hoke, We’re All Getting Old: Interprofessional Undergraduate Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults with Lori Metzger
          • Thursday, May 4 at 1:15 p.m. - Hanan Ben Nacef, Sedentary Lifestyles Leading to Exercise Induced Hypernea and Tachycardia in University Students with Candice Klingerman
          • Thursday, May 4 at 2 p.m. - Morgan Munyan, Age Variation in American Sign Language with Jessica Bentley
          • Thursday, May 4 at 3:30 p.m. - Emily Broadbent, Adoption of a Mouse Model to Study Malignant Melanoma with Angela Hess

          Literature class takes in NYC art exhibits

          European Literature

          This spring, Christina Francis took her European Literature I class to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Onassis Cultural Center in New York City. This trip consisted of viewing Greek and Roman art exhibits and the European Galleries at the MOMA and a new exhibit entitled, “A World of Emotions: Ancient Greece, 700 B.C. to 200 A.D.” at the Onassis Cultural Center.

          This exhibit was a special treat, according Francis, associate professor of English, because it is only being displayed until June 24.

          Before making the trip, the students received a guest lecture from Deborah Walberg, assistant professor of art and art history, on the development of Greek statuary from impact of the earlier Egyptians, to its influence on Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. Students were told to focus on artifacts that would help them develop a research project on a myth or character of their choosing from among the course’s texts.

          Though, many students had difficulty choosing one specific artifact, since each and every one was incredibly unique. Clayton Newton, a sophomore English and secondary education major, was especially awestruck.

          “In the Museum of Art it’s hard to stay focused on the Greek art exhibits, because every time you turn your head there is some amazing artifact that pulls you into another room,” Newton said. “What truly became easier was respecting the sculptures and realizing that the naked woman in front of the Andruss Library has nothing on the high quality sculptures of the Greeks.”

          Model EU wins award at spring simulation

          Andruss Library

          Bloomsburg University’s Model European Union attended a sponsored simulation this spring by the University of Pittsburgh where two students brought home the Best Delegate Award.

          Nathan Copenhaver, a junior business and economics major, and Shyer Amin, a senior business and economics major, were awarded the 2017 best delegates.

          “MEU is a simulation of contemporary real life problems and issues that the world faces today,” Amin said. “First, it makes me informed about things that are happening around the world. Second, it greatly improved my articulation and debate skills. It is important in life to speak persuasively and also eloquently.”

          MEU brings people and experiences together for all over. People put aside their differences and achieve a common goal. According to Amin, achieving these experiences and making new connections is some of the benefits of being a part of MEU.

          Research showcased at national education conference

          SITE Conference

          A trio of Bloomsburg University faculty representing the College of Education and College of Science and Technology presented research at the 28th annual SITE conference-Society for Information Technology and Education this spring in Austin, Texas.

          SITE promotes the development and dissemination of theoretical knowledge, conceptual research, and professional practice knowledge through its conference, books, collaborative projects with other organizations, and the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education.

          At the conference, the faculty presented:

          • Lynn Hummel, assistant professor of instructional technology — “Pokémon Go for learning: A gamification approach,” which explored methods to learn ways in which Pokémon Go can be transformed into educational lessons on the topics of science, math, and geography.
          • Beth Rogowsky, assistant professor of teaching and learning, and Caryn Terwilliger, assistant professor of teaching and learning — “The Effect of Tech Time in Preschool: A Randomized Controlled Study,” which explored the controversy over the use of technology with our youngest learners. Are computers replacing time children can be learning through play?

          Senior makes history as Fulbright Scholar

          Alexandra Miller

          Becoming a Fulbright Scholar has been a dream of Alexandra Miller's since high school. This summer the Bloomsburg University senior languages and cultures major will get to live her dream when she travels to Argentina as part of the Fulbright Scholar program.

          “I first heard about Fulbright back in high school and it has been something I have always wanted to do,” says Miller. “I love to travel and learning languages. Last fall, Julie Vandivere, director of the Honors Program, encouraged me to apply for the program. She also offered to write a letter of recommendation.”

          After thinking about what she wanted to do after graduation and what she’s passionate about Miller started the application process. Miller, the first BU student to be a Fulbright Scholar, was naturally thrilled when she learned she was selected.

          “I could’t believe my eyes when I received the email,” Miller says. “I know that this once in a lifetime opportunity that will change my life for the better and will teach me lessons few people are lucky enough to learn in a lifetime. It is always an incredibly rewarding feeling when you achieve something you have worked so hard and long on.”

          Honor Society places in national competition

          Phi Omega Pi

          Bloomsburg University's chapter of Pi Omega Pi recently placed fifth nationally at the honor society’s national competition in Chicago. Pi Omega Pi is the National Business Education Teacher Honor Society, which has promoted scholarship and service in the area of business education for more than 80 years.

          Prior to the national competition, each chapter was required to complete three projects-local, state and national related to furthering the profession. The BU chapter redesigned the national website, volunteered at the Pennsylvania Business Education Annual Conference and served as conference assistants at the PA Future Business Leaders of America State Leadership Conference. In addition, students presented a workshop on "Active Learning."

          Professors Christina Force and Maggie O’Connor, advisors to the group, also saw the BU chapter win the Participation Award for being the most active chapter at the competition, the only attending to receive the honor.

          Commencement Speakers Announced

          Spring Commencement

          Bloomsburg University announces commencement speakers at the school’s 148th Commencement ceremony on May 13. Frank T. Brogan, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education; Cole Camplese, ’96 M.S, chief information officer (CIO) and associate vice president at the University of Chicago; and Cynthia Shapira, chair of the Board of Governors will address the graduates at ceremonies to be held on the Academic Quadrangle.

          • Brogan will speak to the graduates of the Zeigler College of Business and the College of Education at 8:30 a.m. Brogan became the fourth chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education on October 1, 2013. A lifelong educator, Brogan previously served as chancellor of the State University System of Florida, was president of Florida Atlantic University and twice elected lieutenant governor of the state of Florida.
          • Camplese will speak to the graduates of the College of Science and Technology at noon. Camplese is the associate vice president for information technology and chief information officer (CIO) at the University of Chicago. He oversees campus-wide information technology decisions and guides the strategic use of technology at one of the nation’s most elite research universities.
          • Shapira will speak to the graduates of the College of Liberal Arts at 3:30 p.m. Shapira is president of the Shapira Foundation and a community activist. She serves as chair of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education Board of Governors. She is a trustee of Brandeis University and board member of the Allegheny County Airport Authority and the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust.

          Soil Judging ready for national stage

          Soil Judging

          Matthew Ricker has quickly made a name for himself in his short time at Bloomsburg University. The young assistant professor’s passion for soil science has become rather contagious among students in the Department of Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences, and his talents of soil ribboning have reached legendary status.

          And these students would know. They are a good judge of soil, among the best in the country to be exact. They proved it this past fall by winning the Northeast Regional Collegiate Soil Judging Contest at Pennsylvania State University in just the team’s second year of competition.

          The winning team — BU took two teams of students to regionals — will test their talents on the national level this week at Northern Illinois University, host of the National Soil Judging Contest. BU will be competing against several larger schools with established soil judging programs such as University of Maryland, West Virginia University, Virginia Tech, and Kansas State.

          Distinguished prof headlines Economics Lecture Series

          Alan B. Krueger

          Princeton professor Alan B. Krueger will be the spring speaker for the 2016-17 Economics Lecture Series. His lecture, “The Rise of Alternative Work Arrangements in the U.S.,” will be on Tuesday, April 25, at 2 p.m. in Mitrani Hall in the Haas Center for the Arts. This lecture is free and open to the public.

          Krueger is the Bendheim professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University. He holds a joint appointment in the department of economics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is also the founding director of the Survey Research Center at Princeton. He received his bachelor’s with honors from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations in 1983 as well as a masters and doctoral degree in economics from Harvard in 1985 and 1987.

          Dance minor students present "Healing the Quake”

          Dance Minor Showcase

          Featuring performances by students, Bloomsburg University will be hosting the 7th annual Dance Minor concert, “Healing the Quake.” Performances will be Sunday, April 23, at 3 p.m. and Monday, April 24, at 7:30 p.m. in Mitrani Hall in the Haas Center for the Performing Arts. This event is free and open to the public.

          This year’s Dance Minor concert covers an array of dance styles featuring student, faculty and staff talents. Varied guest artist designers will be working alongside with lighting, costuming, choreography and performance. Assistant professor of dance Julie Petry will be serving as artistic director.

          Themes for the dance pieces include political and social commentary on racism, exploration of props — including fabric, elastics and drumsticks — a glimpse at romantic relationships that fail and/or succeed and dance exploring the acceptance of one’s body. Performances will showcase powerful imagery and moments connecting energy, music, expression and visual meaning.

          Celebrating the impact of scholarships

          Scholarship Recipients

          The bell above Carver Hall recently rang to celebrate The Bloomsburg University Foundation’s Scholarship Luncheon on Sunday, April 2 in the Kehr Union Ballroom.

          This year, more than 60 scholarship recipients had the opportunity to make a personal connection with their donors who invested in their futures and thank them for their generosity.

          Since the beginning of the It’s Personal Campaign in 2010, 129 new scholarships have been created and more than $6 million has been distributed to thousands of deserving BU students. Each year, donors look forward to attending the Scholarship Luncheon to meet the recipients and learn about how their scholarships have made a difference in their lives.

          Sophomore wins PASSHE Business Plan Competition

          A love of fly-fishing and a desire to improve the delivery of flies to anglers led to Bloomsburg University student Nathaniel Treichler, a sophomore business administration management major, to win the $10,000 first place prize in the sixth annual Student Business Plan Competition sponsored by Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education (PASSHE).  

          Treichler has enjoyed the sport of fly-fishing for years and always wanted to start a business around his favorite activity. “I knew the business model had to be different,” says Treichler. “There are hundreds of fly fishing companies, but they focus on a one-time sell. My goal was to build a community of fly anglers who would purchase on a predictable, repetitive basis, which is how the subscription basis model started.  After that, I simply designed The Fly Crate's Members' Club.”

          “I am fortunate to have Dr. Steven Welch as a mentor and adviser, and he told me about the PASSHE competition near the end of 2016 Spring semester,” Treichler continued. “The business plan took me a week of writing for two hours every night. I had it crammed in my head for over a year, so when it came time to put it on paper, it came easily.”

          The Fly Crate has been in business since February of 2016. After a slow start, it now has close to 2,000 customers.

          “Starting a business from scratch is not easy,” Treichler says. “It is not something you learn through reading books or going online because all publications say the same thing, ‘it depends on your business,’ so you’re stuck.” 

          The annual Business Plan Competition is designed to provide student entrepreneurs a real-world opportunity to pitch their original business plans and to win funds to assist in the start-up of their businesses. Students from the 14 State System universities are invited to participate in the competition each year.

          “The imagination and ingenuity on display certainly gives me confidence in our future, and a real sense of pride in our students, our faculty and our universities,” State System Board of Governors Chair Cynthia D. Shapira said during the awards ceremony held at the Dixon University Center.

          “Before the announcement of the winners, I had my doubts whether I would or could win,” says Treichler. “I was confident that I would be in the top three, but you never know how the judges make their decisions and what criteria they were looking for. On the other hand, I was excited that I made it to the finals and had a chance to meet so many innovative people.”

          “I plan to use the prize money to improve the ‘unboxing’ experience of The Fly Crate packaging and on internet marketing,” says Treichler.

          Treichler is also proud that The Fly Crate is helping disabled veterans.

          “When members purchase six flies, we donate one to Project Healing Waters,” Treichler says. “Project Healing Waters helps with the physical and mental rehabilitation of disabled active military, service personnel, and disabled veterans.

          “With great determination, I want to become the largest monthly fly club in the U.S. with over 1,000 members,” says Treichler. “The Fly Crate will also expand our current operations into the fly tying market. At the same time, we'll be growing the online fly shop with a variety of innovative new fly designs and publishing content-rich articles. More importantly, I see The Fly Crate having a large voice in conservation and educating the public in preserving our natural resources for generations to come.”

          Go under the sea with Springfest

          The 7th annual end-of-year celebration, Springfest, will take place on Friday and Saturday, April 21 and 22, with free food and giveaways. The event’s theme is “Discover the Treasures Under the Sea."

          Springfest will begin with a Luau on Friday, April 21, at 2 p.m. on Lycoming Lawn. The festivities will continue with a musical performance by America’s Got Talent Semi-Finalist pop artists, 3 Shades of Blue at 6:30 p.m. in the Scranton Commons Amphitheatre, bingo at 9 p.m. in the Kehr Union Multipurpose Room 345 A/B, and Friday’s activities will conclude with a Late Night Taco Cart beginning at 11 p.m. on the Kehr Union Patio.

          All of Saturday’s events will take place on upper campus. Registration does not open until 11:30 a.m. in the Nelson Field House, but activities like climbing the rock wall and zip-lining will be open at 10 a.m. Some Saturday’s festivities include free Rita’s Italian Ice, pet therapy dogs, arts and crafts, various games, and a tie dye tent. The day will conclude with a Dynamic Duo contest at 1 p.m. and the winner of the banner contest will be announced at 2 p.m.

          Zeigler COB to hold international business dinner

          Zeigler College of Business

          In the spirit of sharing cultures and global business, Bloomsburg University’s Zeigler College of Business will host a Vietnamese International Business Dinner on Wednesday, April 26, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Kehr Union Ballroom. This event is free and open to the public.

          At this international dinner, attendees will have the opportunity to learn about Vietnamese culture and food as well as the economy and how to do business in Vietnam. Several traditional Vietnamese dinner dishes will be served. Student speakers will also present key information to know about Vietnam. Students can earn one ZIPD point at this event.

          The Global Business Institute and the Global Business Association are sponsors of the dinner. Seating is limited so RSVP on Husky Career Link or by emailing Katelyn Donovan at ked33814@huskies.bloomu.edu. Business casual attire is recommended.

          Huskies to “strike out” sexual assault in awareness game

          Huskies Baseball

          In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Bloomsburg University’s baseball team along with the Women’s Resource Center and the LGBTQA Resource Center will raise awareness of the issue when the Huskies host West Chester University in a doubleheader on Saturday, April 22 at Danny Litwhiler Field. Game one will begin at 1 p.m. Admission is free.

          In 2014, former President Barack Obama launched the “It’s on Us” campaign to end sexual assault on college campuses. Inspired by this campaign, BU’s Women’s Resource Center took a step further with the personalized “Huskies Don’t Harm” campaign. The “Huskies Don’t Harm” campaign mirrors the goals of the “It’s on Us” pledge by asking people to pledge support to survivors of sexual violence, learn more about sexual violence, advocate to end harm and help make a difference.

          Earth Day celebration on the Quad

          Reduce, re-use, and recycle! Being environmentally friendly is fundamental to the Husky lifestyle. What better day to love the environment than Earth Day?

          Bloomsburg University will be holding an Earth Day festival on Wednesday, April 19, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Students can join the campus-wide event on the Quad while wearing their brightest colors. Enjoy food, music, and learn new ways to be eco-friendly all the while relaxing on our beautiful campus.

          Students and community members alike can compete in a Scavenger Hunt, Wheel of Fortune, Are you smarter than a Vegan, a sack race, and more. Prizes and snacks will be available to all participants. Selfies are encouraged at the Earth Day Photo Booth where participants can also pledge their allegiance to keeping the environment thriving.

          Anchor Program aids foster children

          Centennial Hall

          Children aging-out of the foster care system are more likely to end up unemployed or worse yet, in prison, within five years according to numerous studies. A new Bloomsburg University initiative, the Anchor Program, aims to engage youth, ages 15-18, to help change those statistics.

          The Anchor Program will give children in the foster care program a chance to explore their academic interests and talents through a multi-year summer residential college life experience program and year-round mentorship opportunities. The inaugural session of the program is scheduled for July 15 to 22. WBRE News Coverage!

          Shark Tank-style entrepreneur competition

          Zeigler College of Business

          More than 70 young, aspiring teams of entrepreneurs have registered to be part of Bloomsburg University’s inaugural Husky Dog Pound competition, a Shark Tank-like battle for $50,000 in prize money, on April 18. The event is sponsored by the Zeigler College of Business, Microsoft, and Allan Darr from ProAct LTD.

          The competition is open to Bloomsburg University students, Bloomsburg University Alumni, community members from Columbia and Montour counties, and high school students from across Pennsylvania.

          The Husky Dog Pound Competition starts with a preliminary round called the Husky Den where competitors will upload 1-2 minute video presentations about their business idea. Teams moving forward will compete in a second round of the Husky Den requiring a 3-5 minute video presentation further explaining their business, while answering seven specific questions from the judging committee.

          The Acapella Company brings engaging learning experience

          Discussing how Negro Spirituals portrayed the story of a people, the story of a nation, and the story of humanity, Barry Wilson of The Acapella Company delves into “Portraits of American History: A Chronology of Negro Spirituals” at Bloomsburg University.

          The program will be held on Thursday, April 20, at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall, K.S. Gross Auditorium. Admission is free and open to the public.

          The program will engage participants in a learning experience that includes spoken narratives, visual illustrations and live music. Wilson will focus on experiencing the emotions of the slaves and the importance of the spirituals they created.

          The biggest Big Event of them all

          More than 2,100 volunteers tackling nearly 200 job sites turned the seventh annual #CGABigEvent into the largest one yet.

          Sponsored by the CGA, the single-day community service event gives students the opportunity to say “thank you" to Bloomsburg area residents and show appreciation for the community we live, learn and work in.

          Among the locations included The First Presbyterian Church, Children’s Museum, Kocher Park and roughly 75 local residences. Student volunteers tackled a host of chores such as raking, painting, gardening, mulching, removing debris, digging and various spring-cleaning duties.

          Sophomore wins PASSHE prize

          Business Plan Competition

          A love of fly-fishing and a desire to improve the delivery of flies to anglers led to Nathaniel Treichler, a sophomore business administration management major, to win the $10,000 first place prize in the sixth annual Student Business Plan Competition sponsored by Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education (PASSHE).

          Treichler has enjoyed the sport of fly-fishing for years and always wanted to start a business around his favorite activity. “I knew the business model had to be different,” says Treichler. “There are hundreds of fly fishing companies, but they focus on a one-time sell. My goal was to build a community of fly anglers who would purchase on a predictable, repetitive basis, which is how the subscription basis model started. After that, I simply designed The Fly Crate's Members' Club.”

          Block Party restrictions for this weekend

          Town of Bloomsburg

          Bloomsburg University and the Town of Bloomsburg, Town/Gown Relations Committee, will implement two initiatives to increase security related to the annual spring event known as "Block Party."

          The new initiatives include:

          • Parking Restrictions — Bloomsburg University will temporarily close the Lightstreet Road Parking Lot and the ATM Parking Lot to all vehicles and temporarily restrict access to the First Street (Green) Parking Lot to permit-holders only from noon Friday, April 21, through noon Sunday, April 23.
          • Residence Hall Visitation Restrictions — Bloomsburg University will temporarily restrict overnight guests in the residence halls to one visitor per student for the evenings of Friday, April 21, Saturday, April 22, and Sunday, April 23. A professional security company firm will assist in managing guest registrations and enhance front door security.

          CAS presents veterans tribute

          A Juilliard graduate and former member of Twyla Tharp’s troupe THARP!, Lang's choreography is in demand worldwide. In 2014, just three years after creating her own dance troupe, she received the dance equivalent of an Oscar, the Bessie Award. The company’s Celebrity Artist Series performance will feature her work Thousand Yard Stare, a piece designed to honor wounded veterans and those affected by war set to Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 15, Opus 132.

          Jessica Lang Dance will appear on the Mitrani Stage on Friday April 14, at 7:30 p.m. and will present a workshop and discussion on “Creating wardrobe and costuming for live dance, discovering inspiration from non-traditional sources,” as she speaks about her process for creating Thousand Yard Stare. This discussion — open free to the public — will be presented in the upper lobby of Haas Center from 5 to 6 p.m.

          Team of seniors win regional nurse challenge

          Regional Nurse Challenge

          A team of six Bloomsburg University senior nursing majors recently won the Geoffrey Allen Walp Memorial 14th Annual Student Nurse Challenge at East Stroudsburg University. The challenge is based on the College Bowl program where teams compete in a quiz style competition.

          The teams answered questions similar to what will be asked on the NCLEX-RN exam, which all nursing graduates will take upon completion of the program to become licensed as registered nurses.

          Nursing students from seven different schools of nursing in Northeast Pennsylvania competed in the challenge. Brining home trophy for BU were Rachel Garraway, Samantha Bailey, Nicole Walsh, Rachel Toter and Amy Jo Zimmerman.

          A celebration of cultural diversity

          International Festival

          Join the International Students Association, International Education Services (IES), the Dean of Students Office and Center for Diversity and Inclusion for Bloomsburg University’s annual International Diversity Festival on Friday, April 14, at 5:30 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom.

          The festival will feature opportunities to explore cultural diversity from around the globe. It’s sponsored by the Community Government Association and the Campus-Wide Committee on Human Relations.

          IES promotes intercultural exchanges throughout our campus and local communities by organizing and hosting popular diversity activities.

          Solo show opens at Haas Gallery of Art

          Blake Conroy Exhibit

          Artist Blake Conroy opened his solo show at Haas Gallery of Art on Tuesday, March 28. The show runs from through May 3.

          Conroy writes that he makes images of nature by cutting holes in the surface of either paper or metal. His subject matter is the minutiae of his environment. His practice is to draw with the intent of cutting material and still make a recognizable image.

          The image has to hold together on the page as well as hold the paper/metal together. He will draw, then redraw an image, sometimes as many as three or four times. He will layer those images one on top of the other to add dimension to the drawing. His intent is to have his viewers see their surroundings in a new way

          Campus construction activity for the spring

          Campus Construction

          Campus maps show the facilities planning and construction project sites for 2017. The intent of the general map is to identify the locations and dates that will be affected, as well as identify the spring project.

          As always, some projects will affect pedestrian and vehicular movements more than others. Those projects will be supplemented with additional phasing and traffic plans.

          As projects progress, larger more detailed maps will be provided as needed to communicate details in advance of the changes. The two projects with the most impact on pedestrian and vehicular movements are the new residence hall and bookstore, and the Centennial Hall steam and condensate line replacement.

          Visiting artist helps highlight PADME showcase

          Personal Adornment and Makeup Extravaganza

          Bloomsburg University will showcase wearable art, avant-garde fashion, performance, and theatrical makeup at the Personal Adornment and Makeup Extravaganza on Thursday, April 13, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Caldwell Consistory in Bloomsburg. The event is sponsored by the Center for Visual and Performing Arts. Admission is free and open to the public with doors opening at 4:30 p.m.

          PADME visiting artist Leisa Rich will hold an artist lecture on Thursday, April 13, from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. as well as a “Basic Fosshape Workshop” from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Old Science Hall, room 311. Admission is free and open to the public.

          The workshop will consist of methods when working with heat activated composite material and heat activated fabric for theatre, costumes, millinery, mask or armor making, puppetry, props, cosplay, craft work, model making, set design, and more. Preregistration for the workshop is required by Wednesday, April 12.

          Former White House social secretary gives address

          Deesha Dyer

          Former White House Social Secretary to the Obama administration Deesha Dyer will be giving a keynote address at Bloomsburg University on Wednesday, April 12, at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall’s Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. This event is free and open to the public.

          Dyer will share her personal journey on how she paved her way to becoming the White House Social Secretary under the Obama Administration. Her keynote address will focus on how she climbed using determination and hard work, not where she landed.

          After graduating from Milton Hershey School, a private philanthropic boarding school in Hershey, college seemed inventible for Dyer until financial hardships made her return home. After years of determination while working at the Pennsylvania Real Estate Invest Trust, Dyer returned to school at the Community College of Philadelphia. While there, Dyer became an intern at the Office of Scheduling and Advance at the White House. This one internship paved the way for various positions under the Obama administration until Dyer ultimately became the White House Social Secretary.

          Paws for a Cause

          More than 15 dogs will be ready to play on Monday, April 10 from noon to 4 p.m. The Students Saving Shelter Animals (SSSA), BUnow and The Pet Therapy organizations are teaming up to host the “Paws for a Cause” event.

          The event will be held on the Academic Quad and the patio of the Student Services Center, to raise money for shelter animals and create awareness of the SSSA and Pet Therapy organizations. Students who attend will get to meet shelter dogs available for adoption and rescued pet therapy dogs. The event will feature other activities, like a kissing booth that features dogs instead of people and anyone can have their photo taken while getting a kiss from the dogs. There will also be student representatives from SSSA able to answer questions about adoption.

          Husky Career Road Trip to WepageFX

          WepageFX

          Are you passionate about Internet marketing, web design or web development? Do you get jazzed about learning new tricks of the trade? Are you all about having fun while working hard? If so, here’s Husky Career Road Trip for you to WebpageFX on Wednesday, April 12 in Harrisburg. Hear about this fast-paced, ever-evolving industry directly from Internet marketers, social media specialists and content marketers.

          This trip is recommended for juniors and seniors but any student, in any major, can sign up. The bus departs from the Alumni House at 1 p.m. and returns to campus at 8:30 p.m. There is no cost but hurry to save your spot on the bus with your RSVP via Husky Career Link.

          Anti-transgender demonstration

          As a public institution, our campus is open to individuals and groups who hold a variety of beliefs. Free and open discourse is a hallmark of a comprehensive educational experience. As such, everyone must be afforded the ability to speak, listen, challenge and learn from diverse perspectives.

          Earlier today, an off-campus group was present on campus for several hours expressing its anti-transgender views. In response, LGBTQA Resource Center set up a table on site, provided information about LGBTQA issues and rights, and engaged in civil discourse. As president, I am proud that our community could exchange disparate viewpoints in a way that was civil and safe for all participants.

          At Bloomsburg, we strive to provide a safe and inclusive environment. Should any Bloomsburg University student want to discuss the issues further, feels threatened, or just wants to talk, they should contact one of the following: LGBTQA Resource Center at 570-389-2819; Dean of Students Office, Student Assistance at 570-389-4984 and Office of Social Equity at 570-389-4553.

          Alumna joins women’s national rugby team

          Nikki Snyder

          Watch the U.S. Women’s National Rugby Sevens team play and you may see a familiar face.

          Nikki Snyder, a recent Bloomsburg University nursing graduate and Women’s Club Rugby team player, is competing professionally with the Eagles, recently in the HSBC Women’s Elite Sevens Series in Las Vegas. She helped me place fourth out of 12 teams in the world. Recruits discovered Snyder during her years of playing on BU’s club rugby team, which reached the National DII Rugby Tournament each of the last three years, including its first-ever trip in 2014. After receiving several invitations to private USA rugby camps, Snyder was selected to play for the Eagles team.

          “The transition from Bloomsburg to international competition was a change,” Snyder said. “When you play at a club sport level, you are playing against individuals, like yourself, who have just started learning about the sport. In international competition, you face individuals who have been playing the sport for years and understand the rules on how to play the game.”

          Ice hockey caps Division II climb with league title

          Ice Hockey Club

          Two years ago, Bloomsburg University’s Ice Hockey Club took a step up in competition and not only has proven its worth — it’s now champion.

          In just their second season competing in the Greater Northeastern Collegiate Hockey Conference as part of the Division II American Collegiate Hockey Conference the Huskies recently took home the league’s championship trophy by defeating Kutztown University.

          “Being with the team for four years and working so hard to get the program back on track, it’s great to end my final season with a championship and seeing all the work pay off,” said Matt Mastrogiovanni, senior forward.

          The last few seasons have been building years. The club competed independently in Division III and during their 2015-16 season the team was noticed for being successful, ultimately invited to compete up a level in Division II.

          “These past four years have been a roller coaster ride for our program,” said Kyle Gallen, senior defensemen. “It has been amazing seeing where were freshman year and ending our senior year as league champions! I couldn’t be more proud of the boys and our coaches for such a successful season.”

          Pioneering journalist offers empowering message

          Joann Lublin

          Joann Lublin, the first female reporter for the Wall Street Journal and book author, spoke at Bloomsburg University regarding Women’s History Month. Lublin shared her personal struggles while being a woman in the 1970s work force, along with other woman’s stories, referencing her book, “Earning it: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World.”

          “When you enter the work force, you earn it,” Lublin said. “Earn the pay you deserve, earn credibility, and earn power in your job by taking on a risky role.“

          In just her twenties, Lublin joined the Wall Street Journal, identifying herself as one of first few female reporters. She moved from Chicago to Washington where she covered labor issues and urban affairs and by 1987, she became deputy bureau chief of The Journal’s important London bureau, its first run by a woman. To take her career even further, Lublin moved to New York and opened her own advice column known today as “Your Executive Career,” previously named “Managing Your Career.”

          “Looking back, the advice I would give to my 20-year-old self would be ‘ask for some time to think about important change in your life. Think first, talk next,’’’ Lublin said.

          Awards dinner honors alumni, retiring president

          Alumni Awards Ceremony

          Retiring President David L. Soltz and Roberta “Robbie” L. Soltz, Ph.D., were named 2017 honorary alumnus and alumna, at the annual Bloomsburg University Alumni Awards Dinner on April 1.

          The BU Alumni Association conferred honorary status on the Soltzes in recognition of the significant impact they have had on the university since Dr. David Soltz became the 18th president in January 2008. During his tenure, President Soltz has concentrated on building programs and infrastructure for today’s students and those who will follow. The university’s strategic plan, Impact 2015: Building on the Past, Leading for the Future, was developed in fall 2010 under his leadership and updated as Impact 2017. Many of the initiatives outlined in the plan focused on experiential learning and enhancing opportunities for all students to succeed, personally and professionally, in an increasingly complex global environment.

          Nursing program ranked as most affordable in PA

          Nursing Degree

          A nursing degree from Bloomsburg University is ranked by College Choice as the most affordable nursing degree in Pennsylvania. Schools were ranked in each state by increasing value of the sum of the published in-state tuition and mandatory fees.

          The rating places BU’s nursing program above six sister institutions in Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education: West Chester, second; Edinboro, third; Slippery Rock, fourth; California, fifth; Indiana, sixth; and Clarion, seventh.

          College Choice is an independent online publication dedicated to helping students and their families find the right college. They publish rankings and reviews that make choosing the best college easier, as well as resources to help students get into, pay for, and thrive at the college of their choice.

          Nursing program ranked third in state

          BU's nursing program is ranked third in the state by RegisteredNursing.org. BU’s program is the only Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) school ranked in the top 10.

          Nursing programs were assessed on several factors which represent how well a program supports students towards licensure and beyond. Among the factors surveyed was the pass rate for the NCLEX-RN exam, used by all state boards of nursing in the United States to help assess a student's competency for licensure. RegisteredNursing.org wrote that BU’s programs are rigorous and demanding but offer real world clinical labs, patient-based theory and supportive faculty. Nursing graduates are prepared for professional life in an array of situations.

          The ranking is the second time this year the Bloomsburg University Nursing program has received statewide recognition. In late February College Choice ranked a BU nursing degree as the most affordable nursing degree in Pennsylvania.

          Library Friends plan author’s dinner

          Matthew Lysiak

          The Friends of the Bloomsburg University Library Association will hold their Fifteenth Annual Author's Dinner, on Friday, April 7, beginning at 6 p.m. at Monty’s. Honorees and speakers are journalists Matthew Lysiak and his ten-year-old daughter Hilde.

          Matthew Lysiak is a journalist and co-author of the young adult memoir of teen scientist Jack Andraka, Breakthrough: How One Teen Innovator Is Changing the World and author of Newtown: An American Tragedy. A former reporter for the New York Daily News, he has been a contributor on The Today Show, MSNBC, Fox News, and CNN. Hilde Kate Lysiak is the publisher of the Orange Street News, a print and online newsletter for which she has broken hundreds of stories in her hometown of Selinsgrove. She is also author of the upcoming book series “Hilde Cracks the Case” and recently reached a deal to produce a television series on her life.

          For more information, menu options and reservations contact Steven Cohen at drscohen@ptd.net.

          Business students put to the test in sales competition

          Professional Sales Competition

          And it came down to three. Each with 15 final minutes to lay claim to Bloomsburg University’s second annual BU/UPS Sales Competition that featured 18 student competitors, including representatives from Kings College and Wilkes University.

          The day — organized and managed by Monica J. Favia, coordinator of Zeigler College of Business professional sales program — started with a competition round where each student had 15 minutes to present and close. Three finalists were chosen, who then had another 15 minutes for their final presentations with the same judging criteria.

          Josh Salak, a senior business administration marketing and finance major, won the competition. Fellow finalists were runner-up Alison DiClemente, a senior business administration marketing major, and third place finisher Chris Mekosh, a senior communication studies major pursuing minors in economics and marketing. Judges, who were all industry professionals, also looked at the students’ communication skills and overall performance.

          NBS completes four-peat at national convention

          It was their final trip with Bloomsburg University’s National Broadcasting Society, the annual spring semester convention that has included visits to Atlanta, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C. and recently New York City.

          So, of course the contingent of senior mass communications majors wanted to make it count. And they did, winning the On-The-Spot promo competition at the NBS-AERho National Electronic Media Association Convention for the fourth straight time.

          On-The-Spot, which itself has several categories, is one of many competitions held at the convention. BU’s chapter has zeroed in successfully on the promo category that calls for students to create a 30-second promo for NBS on sight within two days to film, edit and produce the clip for the judges.

          Graduate students published in international journal

          Having an article published in the International Journal of Play is not as easy as the word play might make it seem.

          Even though most articles are about fun and games the submission process is anything but. However, that did not deter Bloomsburg University education graduate students Kelly Conlon and Ryan Patterson.

          “Writing the essay allowed me to look back and recognize important skills I learned from the game and my interactions with my friends, such as problem solving, compromise, creativity, and creating rules as well as abiding by those rules,” Colon said.

          “I’ve become excited in exploring the vast potential that different styles of play can provide for learners, especially those in early childhood education,” Patterson said. “I hope to find myself professionally in a program promoting more opportunities for learning outside the current, conventional setting.”

          Language major lands competitive CLS award

          Cassandra Souza

          You’re currently spending the semester abroad and get a chance to stay for an entire year, would you? Cassandra Souza certainly did, not thinking twice about it.

          It all began when Souza, a senior, decided to pursue two degrees in linguistics for Spanish and Arabic at Bloomsburg University. Her first study abroad trip took place in summer of 2015 during a six-week program to Fez, Morocco. That was just the start to Souza’s journey.

          “Before you study abroad people say ‘culture shock is going to happen,’” Souza said. “It’s very real. You’re going to feel isolated, but I never felt like that. I didn’t have culture shock going in, but when I came home is when I felt it. Reverse culture shock.”

          Souza planned to spend the spring semester in Spain but before leaving, her advisors and mentors — Yahya Laayouni, assistant professor of Arabic and French, and Mykola Polyuha, assistant professor of Russian and German — convinced her to apply for the competitive Critical Language Scholarship Program.

          Souza is the fourth BU student since 2009 to win a CLS award, which is funded through U.S. Department of State.

          “If anything, people hesitate to go abroad,” Souza said. “There’s this barrier where people don’t decide ‘I’m going to do it.’ It’s not as expensive as you’d think. I would just really encourage people travel. Bloomsburg has all of the resources available you just have to want to find them.”

          AMA gets up-close look major marketing agency

          American Marketing Association

          Bloomsburg University’s American Marketing Association regularly takes road trips to sites of potential career options for its marketing majors. One of its first this spring semester was to Marc Advertising Agency (MARC USA) in Pittsburgh. MARC USA is one of the leading advertising agencies in Pittsburgh, Chicago, Miami and Boston. While visiting the Pittsburgh branch, the group received a full tour of the facility and some insights on how the agency runs.

          “Overall our experience at MARC USA was amazing and a great way to learn about all the elements that go into a successful advertisement,” said Lorraine Piccirillo, president of the AMA. “This trip was a very educational as well as great way to bond as a group.”

          Later the group had some fun and explored the city. They saw a full view of Pittsburgh while riding the Monongahela incline, ate at the Hardrock Café and played arcade games at Dave and Busters. Last semester, AMA went to Baltimore and competed in a marketing case competition at Johns Hopkins University. They also visited D4 Creative Advertising Agency in Philadelphia. In past years, they’ve went to BBDO Advertising Agency and Salvatore Ferragamo, both located in New York City.

          “All of our trips are focused on gaining knowledge about the marketing field and getting a glimpse into the daily activities of those within the field,” Piccirillo said. “These trips are also a great way to get our foot in the door for internships or jobs.”

          FOCUS helps celebrate Palm Sunday with campus visit

          Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia, for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, April 9, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and blessings of Siblings' and Children's Weekend on Palm Sunday.

          Through culturally relevant activities and events, and biblical discipleship F.O.C.U.S. promotes Godly unity amongst young adults. In addition to activities and events such as F.O.C.U.S Friday (monthly Bible Study) and “Keeping it 100” (a group meeting and safe space for young adult men). F.O.C.U.S is also actively involved in community service and outreach initiatives.

          Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods, coordinator of minority affairs, at 570-389-4091 for details.

          A new cheerleading chapter begins

          Cheerleading since she was a little girl, Alex Doughtery was destined to cheer in college. And not only that, she became captain. Dougherty, a senior exercise science major, leads a team of 20 at Bloomsburg University along with her three other captains. She helps teach new stunts, dances and cheers.

          “Cheering has helped me with time management skills, leadership skills and meeting a diverse group of people,” Dougherty said. “Cheering has brought a bond within our team."

          Cheerleading try outs will be held this weekend beginning with practice on Saturday, April 8, to learn all the material needed for try outs. The practice will be held at Nelson Field House, 8:30 a.m. to noon. Try outs will take place on Sunday, April 9, at 9 a.m.

          Three nights to go "Beyond Communication"

          Haas Center for the Arts

          Beyond Communication, a three-night session of plays entirely written, performed and directed by students will take place from April 5 to 7 at 7:30 p.m. in Mitrani Hall, Haas Center for the Arts. Tickets are free, open to the public but seating will be limited.

          Each night will feature a different play by a different playwright in the Advanced Scriptwriting class, and will include a talkback session following the performances in order to allow the audience to give feedback to the artists.

          • Wednesday, April 5 — Creatures of the Night by Jonathan Lewis: It's another normal day for college student Scott Hawthorne as he tries to find his way in life.
          • Thursday, April 6 — F-Bomb by Zach Hueston: Girl is having a grand old time cheating on her boyfriend until he walks into the room.
          • Friday, April 7 — Lily by Nate Stosius: War veteran Miles has the grueling task of meeting with his ex-wife today.

          Author featured in Big Dog Reading Series

          Justin Torres

          Author Justin Torres will be reading his work as a part of Bloomsburg University’s Big Dog Reading Series on Wednesday, April 5, at 7 p.m. in the Greenly Center lecture room in downtown Bloomsburg. This program is free and open to the public.

          A national best seller, We the Animals has been translated into 15 languages and is being adapted to film. “Torres plunges us into the chaotic heart of one family, the intense bonds of three brothers, and the mythic effects of this fierce love on the people we must become,” writes Amazon.

          Torres was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard and a Cullman Center Fellow at the New York Public Library. He was named one of 2012’s “5 Under 35” by the National Book Foundation. The Big Dog Reading Series, sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, hosts regionally and nationally known poets and writers to campus.

          LGBTQA presents annual Ally Week

          Ally Week

          Join Bloomsburg University’s LGBTQA for Ally Week starting Monday, April 3 for a full week consisting of continued trainings, workshops, chances to engage with members of the LGBTQA community, a day of appreciation for those that have gone above and beyond in supporting the LGBTQA community here on campus! All events are open free to the public.

          • Monday, April 3: Trans 101 Workshop KUB Multipurpose Room B, 5 p.m. Trans 101 is a one hour presentation that will briefly review gender, sex, and sexuality. It will focus on what it means to be transgender and how to support Trans identified people.
          • Tuesday, April 4: Bystander Intervention Training KUB Multipurpose Room B, 1 p.m. Looking for ways to confront homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, sexism, and other forms of harassment? Then look no further! Come and learn specific strategies to combat all forms of oppression! Co-facilitated by the Women’s Resource Center.
          • Wednesday, April 5: Shades of the Rainbow Workshop KUB Multipurpose Room B, 11 a.m. All too often, the experiences of Queer People of Color go unheard of or are simply forgotten. This workshop will allow participants to explore what it means to be a queer person of color and how to appropriately support those individuals.
          • Thursday, April 6: SpeakOut! Panel KUB Multipurpose Room B, 4:30 p.m. Join members of the LGBTQA Community as they share their coming out stories and answer any questions you may have about the community!
          • Friday, April 7: Ally Appreciation Luncheon KUB Fireside Lounge, 11a.m. to 1 p.m. Join us as we celebrate and recognize those individuals that have gone above and beyond to support the BU LGBTQA community for the 2016-17 year. Light lunch will be provided!

          National Student Employment Appreciation Week

          Bloomsburg will celebrate National Student Employment Appreciation week from April 3 to 7.

          Bloomsburg’s 2016-17 Student Employee of the Year is Justin Sharp, a senior secondary education major, who works as a BOLT support student trainer in the Instructional Media and Design Center. Sharp received a $500 scholarship funded by the Bloomsburg University Foundation. Second place finisher is Sarah Bartra, a senior communication studies major, who works in the Learning Communities Office. Bartra received a $200 University Store gift card.

          The week’s activities include:

          • Tuesday, April 4 – Student employee and supervisor are invited to participate in the Eleventh Annual Team Challenge, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Student Recreation Center.
          • Wednesday, April 5 – Free grilled hot dog and Rita’s Ice for student workers and supervisors at 11:30 a.m. in front of the Warren Student Services Center.
          • Wednesday, April 5 – Student Employee Alumni Panel – Make your Student Employee Experience Shine, 3 to 4 p.m., Warren Student Services Center, room 004.
          • Thursday, April 6 – nominees for 2016-17 Student Employee of the Year will be recognized at a luncheon, Noon in the Kehr Union Building.

          Survey seeks opinions of first year students, seniors

          NSSE Survey

          Take the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and have your voice heard! First-year and senior classes are invited to share opinions about their experiences at Bloomsburg University by completing it by Friday, April 7.

          The survey reveals students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results are used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

          In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey will automatically be entered into a random drawing to win one of 84 prizes: one $150 Amazon gift card, one of two $100 Amazon gift cards, one of nine $50 Amazon gift cards, one of three BU tailgate folding chairs, one of three BU stadium blankets, one of six BU travel mugs, one of five BU smartphone power banks, one of seven BU drawstring bags, one of 20 BU spirit flags, or one of 28 BU iPod armband holders. A student’s chances of winning depend on how many students complete the survey; the last time the survey was administered, 635 students responded making a student’s odds of winning roughly 1 in 8.

          How Professional U can help you!

          More than 140 organizations, including health care systems, school districts, and businesses, will be recruiting student applicants for current internship and job positions at the Spring Career Connections Expo on Friday, April 7, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Nelson Field House. Representatives from Bloomsburg University and other graduate schools will also be there. Students may register to attend and learn how to prepare for the expo.

          Alumni and Professional Engagement offers at Career Closet of gently used, donated, professional clothing for students. Students may select one complete, free outfit by calling the Fenstemaker Alumni House at 570-389-4060 and making an appointment.

          To make the most of the expo and “wow” the recruiters, students are encouraged to attend this upcoming Professional U workshop: Resumania — Tuesday April 4, from 2 to 3 p.m., Andruss Library's Schweiker Room

          Student panels explore topics of diversity

          Student Diversity Panel

          From political correctness to police brutality, diversity has become a key issue in today’s current social climate. Through Bloomsburg University’s Institute for Culture and Society (ICS), the “Bloomsburg Explores Diversity” symposium aims to tackle issues relating to diversity from race to gender to religion. In the series’ first student panel, “Race, Ethnicity and Racism,” students discussed what racial diversity means in today’s society.

          The diverse student panel — Facia Sirleaf, Aubyn Johnson, Monica Abdalmessih, Alexis Mendoxa, Quadirah Locus and Ian Severson — featured multiple perspectives on complex issues of race and ethnicity. Moderated by communication studies professor Erin Brummett, the panel hit upon several aspects of race and ethnicity through personal experiences and insights.

          “It’s important to educate ourselves on things that not only impact ourselves but impact all of us,” Sirleaf said.

          Student Panel 4: Religion, Pluralism and Misconception

          Tuesday, April 4, moderated by Rev. Jill Young, campus minister, at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall 201. Panelists: Tony Mercuri, Shair Spaeth, Amen Elshaekh, Darion Nomie. Morgan Adams, Noah Byerly, and Nour Haj Mabrouk.

          COST unveils confocal microscope

          Having the ability to generate high-resolution micrographs of samples is an important aspect in scientific research.

          Confocal Microscope

          With the acquisition of a state-of-the-art laser scanning confocal microscope at Bloomsburg University, researchers like Jennifer Venditti and Angela Hess, associate professors of biological and allied health sciences, have innovative technology to advance their research.

          The Zeiss LSM 800 Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope utilizes lasers to sequentially scan samples labeled with different types of probes and generate high-resolution images. Applications for this microscope include fixed cell as well as live cell imaging. With this microscope, researchers have the ability to acquire high-resolution images using Zeiss’s patented Airyscan technology.

          “It can be used to image anything from individual cells to sections of tissue,” says Hess.

          Researchers can optically section through their samples and create Z-stacks. These image slices are then reassembled and can be rotated to provide 3D views. This technology allows researchers to more accurately visualize the location of structures within a cell.

          Harvard Press editor to discuss publishing

          Jeff Dean

          If academic publishing is a potential project in your future, Jeff Dean, executive editor of the Harvard University Press, will present Getting Published and Publishing Well on Thursday, March 30, from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Kehr Union Ballroom. Anyone interested in academic publishing should attend this free event.

          Dean will discuss the first steps of getting an academic book published and will explain the process and tips to making a book successful. There will be refreshments as well as a chance for questions and answers after the talk.

          Dean is the executive editor for physical sciences and technology at Harvard University Press. He has been the philosophy editor at Wiley-Blackwell and the senior publisher at Focal Books. He studied German and philosophy at Oberlin College and went on to receive his M.A. and Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has taught courses at the college and high school level in ethical theory, contemporary moral issues, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and environmental philosophy.

          This program is sponsored by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs with assistance from the College of Liberal Arts..

          Mental health panel discussion

          Academic Quad

          A Mental Health and Substance Abuse panel discussion will take place at Bloomsburg University on Thursday, March 30, at 5 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose Room A. The discussion is free to the public and encourages open discussion to work towards solutions together.

          Mental health challenges may increase the use and abuse of illegal substances. Abuse of drugs and alcohol can increase the complexity of mental health issues. This creates a vicious, complex cycle among individuals. Come out Thursday and help to stop the cycle!

          This is a “Think about it Thursday” event: a BU Health and Wellness collaboration with the Departments of Nursing and the College of Education, along with the McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support.

          English professor presents a "Funny" reading

          Jerry Wemple

          Jerry Wemple, professor of English, will present his recently published essay, “Funny” on Wednesday, March 29, at 5 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Student Services Center room 004.

          Wemple’s essay was published in the journal, “Full Grown People” and it addresses the idea of ethnic ambiguity, and how different ethnic groups tend to claim Wemple, except for the one to which he is most biologically related. This essay references pop culture (Porter Wagoner), history, (colonial Maryland’s anti-miscegenation laws), ethnography (Cape Verdeans in Massachusetts), and crime (a mass murder) in an attempt to sort out his Wemple’s own complex family tree.

          This event is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and is free and open to the public.

          BUEA holds drag show fundraiser

          Bloomsburg University's Equality Alliance (BUEA) will hold its biannual Drag Show fundraiser in support of Relay for Life on Tuesday, March 28, at 8 p.m. in the Kehr Union Ballroom.

          The show will feature a wide array of performances by students and alumni. Admission is $1 with a BU student ID and $2 for all others. Audience members are encouraged to give tips to the performers throughout the show with all the money raised going to BU’s Relay for Life.

          BUEA is a student-run LGBT group on campus designed to spread awareness for LGBT-related issues on and off campus, as well as provide students with a positive social outlet and learning environment. It's been hosting this event biannually for several years. Over the last two semesters, the group has raised money for various organizations, including The Women’s Center, Inc., Broadway Cares, and TransKids Purple Rainbow with more $800 raised at the October 2016 show.

          Block Party restrictions announced

          Town of Bloomsburg

          Bloomsburg University and the Town of Bloomsburg, Town/Gown Relations Committee, will implement two initiatives to increase security related to the annual spring event known as "Block Party."

          The new initiatives include:

          • Parking Restrictions – Bloomsburg University will temporarily close the Lightstreet Road Parking Lot and the ATM Parking Lot to all vehicles and temporarily restrict access to the First Street (Green) Parking Lot to permit-holders only from noon Friday, April 21, through noon Sunday, April 23.
          • Residence Hall Visitation Restrictions – Bloomsburg University will temporarily restrict overnight guests in the residence halls to one visitor per student for the evenings of Friday, April 21, Saturday, April 22, and Sunday, April 23. A professional security company firm will assist in managing guest registrations and enhance front door security.

          NASA project features BU research

          NASA's Psyche Project

          Understanding the origins of our solar system will be the focus of a NASA mission and a professor from Bloomsburg University has contributed his research to the project.

          Michael Shepard, professor of environmental, geographical and geological sciences, studied 16 Psyche, an asteroid selected for the mission that has potential to open new windows on one of the earliest eras in the history of our solar system. Only the 16th minor planet discovered — hence its formal designation, 16 Psyche — is an asteroid located between Mars and Jupiter. Discovered in 1852 by Italian astronomer Annibale de Gasparis, the asteroid’s name comes from the Greek mythological figure Psyche. Shepard investigated the asteroid and developed the 3D model the spacecraft’s mission team is using.

          “It’s exciting to contribute to a NASA mission,” said Shepard. 16 Psyche was one of two missions selected from five finalists for funding by NASA. The mission, now in the formation stage, will launch in 2023, arriving at the asteroid in 2030. Scientists believe the mission will provide insight on how planets like Earth may have formed.

          Pulitzer-prize winner speaks for Women’s History Month

          Joann Lublin

          Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania will recognize Women’s History Month with a keynote speech by Joann Lublin, a Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and management news editor for The Wall Street Journal on Thursday, March 23. The speech will be held in Centennial Hall 218 at 2:30 p.m.

          The speech is free and open to the public. The event is sponsored by the Zeigler College of Business and the BU Women’s Resource Center. Lublin’s recent book titled Earning It: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World chronicles the careers of 50 successful women executives.

          Among the first female reporters at The Wall Street Journal, Lublin faced a number of uphill battles in her career. She became deputy bureau chief of The Journal’s important London bureau, its first run by a woman. Now, she and dozens of other women who successfully navigated the corporate battlefield share valuable leadership lessons.

          Lublin combines her fascinating story with tales from more than fifty women who reached the highest rungs of the corporate ladder—most of whom became chief executives—in industries as diverse as retailing, manufacturing, finance, high technology, publishing, advertising, automobiles, and pharmaceuticals.

          Finalists for presidential search visit campus

          Lower Campus

          Bloomsburg University's Presidential Search Committee has completed its initial round of interviews. Four highly qualified candidates have been selected to advance in the process and visited campus on the following days:

          Faculty, staff, and student open forums will be held on April 4, 7, 11, and 14 in Carver Hall's K.S. Gross Auditorium from 10 to 11 a.m. Alumni are also invited to attend these sessions. Candidate CVs and feedback links will be provided shortly before each candidate arrives on campus. Community leaders have been invited to participate in open forums, which will be held on April 3, 6, 10, and 13.

          Strategic reviewers coming to campus

          Academic Quad

          Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) has selected the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) to conduct a strategic review of the State System’s overall operations. This includes reviewing operations at each of the universities and in the Office of the Chancellor, and making recommendations for changes that may be necessary to help ensure the System’s long-term future

          In recent years, NCHEMS has worked with several other higher education systems facing similar challenges. The nonprofit organization will be on campus and has requested to meet with various stakeholders of its choosing on Wednesday, April 26. Their visit to campus will be valuable and critical to the assessment of the system to ensure a thorough review, providing the best outcome for our students, faculty, staff and the surrounding communities.

          Lecture-Recital by visiting composer

          Greg Caffrey

          The department of Music, Theatre and Dance will present a guest lecture-recital by visiting composer, Greg Caffrey on Thursday, March 23 at 7:30 p.m. in Carver Hall, K.S. Gross Auditorium.

          Caffrey is an award-winning composer based in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and is also the Artistic Director of the Hard Rain Soloist Ensemble, a group that specializes in the performance of contemporary classical music.

          Caffrey's presentation will feature live performances of his music by Bloomsburg University guitar professor Matthew Slotkin, including the premiere performance of a new work entitled "Filigree."

          This event is funded by a Curricular Enhancement Award from the Bloomsburg University College of Liberal Arts

          Get career virtual over Spring Break

          Take your professional development home with you this spring break and take advantage of these virtual workshop opportunities. Each workshop is offered online via at Husky Career Link. Brush up on your interviewing skills, develop or fix up your resume and cover letter, learn how to market yourself and communicate with employers through these upcoming virtual workshops:

          • Monday - Interviewing 101
          • Tuesday - Resume and Cover Letters: Your Ticket to an Interview
          • Wednesday - Interviewing: Preparing for Employment Questions
          • Thursday- LinkedIn: Employers EXPECT you to have one. Do You?
          • Upcoming Husky Career Road Trips that are open to students in any major
          • Five companies that will be interviewing students on campus

          Apply for PEG by March 30 for summer experiences. Students looking for financial assistance through a Professional Experience Grant (PEG) to help offset the cost of summer 2017 professional experiences are urged to apply by March 30 for best consideration. All full-time degree students may apply.

          Bloomsburg University’s professional experience grants, which are funded by BU alumni donors and the Student Success fee, are awarded to assist students with professional learning experiences and help them explore their chosen career paths and work alongside colleagues and faculty members.

          To date, 28 students have received monetary awards to participate in faculty-mentored research, academic internships, study abroad, professional conference presentations, service projects and other career-related experiences. The average grant per student was $1,700. For the 2016 Winter Session, 14 awards totaling $19,700 were distributed with students receiving an average grant of $1,400. Seven awards totaling $8,000 were distributed for spring 2017 experiences. The average spring award was $1,000.

          Students find ‘honor’ in annual Jamaican mission trip

          Honors Mission Trip

          A mission trip abroad isn’t typically part of a college curriculum, but Bloomsburg University’s Honors Program makes sure its students have just that opportunity.

          Each year, honors students travel to Jamaica to build houses for underprivileged families and communities. This trip gives students the chance to expand their world views, learn more about Jamaican culture, and see what it’s like in a developing country.

          Rachel Yenney, a junior physics major, was among eight students on the mission trip this winter — the program’s first outside of spring break, which enabled this group to stay longer and engage in Jamaican culture more. It was Yenney's second mission trip out of the country but first with the Honors Program.

          “You can learn about poverty and other cultures in a classroom, but you will never truly understand a culture or their living conditions until you completely immerse yourself in it,” said Yenney, adding she was humbled by how happy most Jamaicans were despite their lack of food, available water, and stable housing. It opened her eyes to how fortunate she is and how people need to focus more on living life with others, rather than just obsessing other the material things.

          Ice hockey caps Division II climb with league title

          Ice Hockey Club

          Two years ago, Bloomsburg University’s Ice Hockey Club took a step up in competition and not only has proven its worth — it’s now champion.

          In just their second season competing in the Greater Northeastern Collegiate Hockey Conference as part of the Division II American Collegiate Hockey Conference the Huskies recently took home the league’s championship trophy by defeating Kutztown University.

          “Being with the team for four years and working so hard to get the program back on track, it’s great to end my final season with a championship and seeing all the work pay off,” said Matt Mastrogiovanni, senior forward.

          The last few seasons have been building years. The club competed independently in Division III and during their 2015-16 season the team was noticed for being successful, ultimately invited to compete up a level in Division II. The Huskies continued their success into this season despite the heightened competition, defeating teams such as Bucknell University, University of Maryland and Le Salle University. The Huskies finished 18-4 overall and 11-1 in conference.

          “These past four years have been a roller coaster ride for our program,” said Kyle Gallen, senior defensemen. “It has been amazing seeing where were freshman year and ending our senior year as league champions! I couldn’t be more proud of the boys and our coaches for such a successful season.”

          Survey seeks opinions of first year students, seniors

          NSSE Survey

          First-year and senior classes are invited to share opinions about their experiences at Bloomsburg University by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement.

          The survey reveals students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results are used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

          In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey will automatically be entered into a random drawing to win one of 84 prizes: one $150 Amazon gift card, one of two $100 Amazon gift cards, one of nine $50 Amazon gift cards, one of three BU tailgate folding chairs, one of three BU stadium blankets, one of six BU travel mugs, one of five BU smartphone power banks, one of seven BU drawstring bags, one of 20 BU spirit flags, or one of 28 BU iPod armband holders. A student’s chances of winning depend on how many students complete the survey; the last time the survey was administered, 635 students responded making a student’s odds of winning roughly 1 in 8.

          “All student responses are valuable for helping us compare the experiences they report with those of students at hundreds of other colleges and universities,” said Sheila Jones, assistant VP for the Office of Planning and Assessment. “The results will also indicate important trends in undergraduate education. More voices will make results more valid.”

          Green Campus Initiative hosts screenings, activities

          After the Spill – The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill changed parts of the Gulf of Mexico forever after 200 million gallons of crude oil were poured into the ecosystem over a period of weeks. This documentary explains how the worst ecological disaster in North American history, just five years after massive destruction from Hurricane Katrina, devastated the coast of Louisiana, all as coastal erosion continues to eat it away at an alarming rate.

          Cindy Venn, professor of environmental, geographical, geological sciences, will help bring the problems of oil spills such as the BP spill or the Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska into focus with explanations and discussion associated with the film. After the Spill is scheduled for March 23 at 7 p.m. in Kuster Auditorium, Hartline Science Center. And in coming weeks more films are being screened; activities and speakers as well are being scheduled.

          • Overburden, the second spring film focuses on coal and the complicated holds it has on Appalachian communities that can be harmed by mining and sustained by it. Overburden is scheduled for April 6th at 7:00 in Kuster Auditorium, Hartline Science Center.
          • BU’s Earth Day observance is being planned and will be held on April 19 with details to be released as plans solidify. And Green Campus Initiative plans to screen spring’s third film, Merchants of Doubt, that evening at 7:00 in Gross Auditorium, Carver Hall.
          • Being planned for April 27: Performing artist, Petersen Tascano, will enlighten the audience on climate change and a host of other topics as he weaves them together with comedy.

          All of the programming is being sponsored by the Green Campus Initiative, some with additional partners.

          Literacy Night tradition continues for local schools

          Literacy Night

          For the last eight years, Bloomsburg University’s education graduate students have participated in the literacy nights at W.W. Evans, Beaver Main and Memorial Elementary schools in Bloomsburg.

          This semester, the literacy night took place at W.W. Evans. Students worked with the administrators and faculty to provide a fun night of games, while providing instructional strategies and tools to help parents work with their children at home.

          Pictured: graduate students working with parents and children, as well as a group photo of students with Principal Tabor and reading specialists Jennifer Casella and Ashley Gregory, both alumni.

          Be the best you at BU

          Nathanial Treichler

          Bloomsburg University's Office of the Dean of Students B the Best U campaign, notified by the BUPD, recognizes the positive contribution of Nathanial Treichler.

          Nate was relaxing in the Commons, having lunch and checking email, when he noticed a fellow student in distress.

          Recognizing the signs of choking, and seeing that everyone else around looked unsure, Nate did not hesitate. He used his Eagle Scout CPR training to administer the Heimlich maneuver, and saved a fellow student’s life.

          So on behalf of B the Best U, the division of Student Affairs, and the Bloomsburg University Police Department we thank Nate for his quick thinking action and being a positive bystander.

          TALE Center to host active learning workshop

          Michael Prince

          Implementing active learning methods in the classroom will be the focus in Bucknell University professor Michael Prince’s “Active Learning for Busy Skeptics (and True Believers)” on Wednesday, March 22, from 3 to 5 p.m. in Multipurpose B, Kehr Union. This workshop is open to all faculty.

          This workshop is relevant to all instructors, focusing on practical examples of how to use active learning in all courses. Instructors will be given time and coaching to develop techniques they can use in their own classrooms. By the end of the session, participants will be able to define active learning and the various methods of it while learning when to utilize each method to make teaching more engaging and effective.

          Deadline for reservation is Friday, March 17. Reservation is required for a certificate of attendance.

          Prince is a professor of chemical engineering at Bucknell University and co-director of the National Effective Teaching Institute. He was actively involved in the establishment of Bucknell University’s Teaching Learning Center and works extensively with the center to support faculty development needs. He is the author of several education-related papers for engineering faculty, focusing on active and inductive teaching strategies. Prince has received the ASEE Mid-Atlantic Section Outstanding Teacher Award as well as Bucknell University’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching.

          Pulitzer-prize winner speaks for Women’s History Month

          Joann Lublin

          Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania will recognize Women’s History Month with a keynote speech by Joann Lublin, a Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and management news editor for The Wall Street Journal on Thursday, March 23. The speech will be held in Centennial Hall 218 at 2:30 p.m. The speech is free and open to the public. The event is sponsored by the Zeigler College of Business and the BU Women’s Resource Center. Lublin’s recent book titled Earning It: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World chronicles the careers of 50 successful women executives.

          Among the first female reporters at The Wall Street Journal, Lublin faced a number of uphill battles in her career. She became deputy bureau chief of The Journal’s important London bureau, its first run by a woman. Now, she and dozens of other women who successfully navigated the corporate battlefield share valuable leadership lessons.

          Lublin combines her fascinating story with tales from more than fifty women who reached the highest rungs of the corporate ladder—most of whom became chief executives—in industries as diverse as retailing, manufacturing, finance, high technology, publishing, advertising, automobiles, and pharmaceuticals.

          KUB staff conducts safety training

          KUB Safety Training

          Bloomsburg University's Kehr Union Building operations staff held a safety training recently for student workers.

          Numerous presents lent their time to present to student such as the Drug Alcohol and Wellness Network who spoke on the Good Samaritan Law and spotting dangerously intoxicated students. The Bloomsburg University Police also sent Officers Bachinger and Lawton to teach student staff how to properly respond to and report disturbances in the Kehr Union Building.

          In addition, Safety Coordinator Scott McBride spoke to student workers about smoke alarms and fire extinguishers. McBride, who is also the Deputy Sheriff of the Bloomsburg Fire Department, was kind enough to bring some crew members to allow students to have a hand on learning experience with properly using fire extinguishers.

          Nursing program ranked as most affordable in PA

          Nursing Degree

          A nursing degree from Bloomsburg University is ranked by College Choice as the most affordable nursing degree in Pennsylvania. Schools were ranked in each state by increasing value of the sum of the published in-state tuition and mandatory fees.

          The rating places BU’s nursing program above six sister institutions in Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education: West Chester, second; Edinboro, third; Slippery Rock, fourth; California, fifth; Indiana, sixth; and Clarion, seventh.

          College Choice is an independent online publication dedicated to helping students and their families find the right college. They publish rankings and reviews that make choosing the best college easier, as well as resources to help students get into, pay for, and thrive at the college of their choice.

          Shark Tank-style entrepreneur competition

          Zeigler College of Business

          More than 70 young, aspiring teams of entrepreneurs have registered to be part of Bloomsburg University’s inaugural Husky Dog Pound competition, a Shark Tank-like battle for $50,000 in prize money, on April 18. The event is sponsored by the Zeigler College of Business, Microsoft, and Allan Darr from ProAct LTD.

          The competition is open to Bloomsburg University students, Bloomsburg University Alumni, community members from Columbia and Montour counties, and high school students from across Pennsylvania.

          The Husky Dog Pound Competition starts with a preliminary round called the Husky Den where competitors will upload 1-2 minute video presentations about their business idea. Teams moving forward will compete in a second round of the Husky Den requiring a 3-5 minute video presentation further explaining their business, while answering seven specific questions from the judging committee.

          President Soltz receives higher education award

          Higher Education Award

          David L. Soltz, president of Bloomsburg University, was honored with the Pennsylvania Black Conference on Higher Education (PBCOHE) Presidents’ Award on Friday, Feb. 24 in Pittsburgh. The conference, first convened in 1971, was organized by Pennsylvania Speaker of the House Rep. K. Leroy Irvis, his aide Mary Davis Baltimore, and black educators from across the state. Soltz was recognized for his policies and actions that demonstrate commitment and dedication to enhancing the mission of the PBCOHE.

          Under Soltz’s leadership, the university increased enrollment of under-represented minority students from 10 percent to more than 17 percent. In addition, there has been an increase in the number of administrators, faculty, and staff of color hired and retained at BU during his tenure. He supported student participation in the PBCOHE Student Leadership Development Institute as well as faculty and staff participation in the Educational Management and Leadership Institute.

          Soltz will retire from Bloomsburg University in June 2017, after nine and a half years. As president, he has served on the board of directors of the American Association of State College and Universities (AASCU) and as vice chair of AASCU Policies and Purposes Committee; led accreditation site team visits for the Middle States Commission on Higher Education; served as chair of the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference; and was the State System of Higher Education presidential representative in the collective bargaining negotiations with the Association for Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties (APSCUF).

          Collaborative artists to exhibit at Greenly Center

          Greenly Center

          Artists Derek Larson and Marc Mitchell will present their seventh collaborative project “Image of a Rind or a Curtain Behind,” focusing on digital patterns, figuration, and outdated avant-garde abstraction at BU. The exhibit will run from Tuesday, March 7 until Wednesday, April 19, at the Greenly Center Gallery on 50 East Main Street, Bloomsburg. Admission is free and open to the public.

          Over the past 4 years, Larson and Mitchell have collaborated on projects at venues such as the University of Alabama; Indiana University of Pennsylvania; University of Wisconsin; Laconia Gallery, Boston; REDUX Contemporary, Charleston; and GRIN Gallery, Providence. Their recent exhibition, “Nothing Ritually,” was featured in the Boston Globe, and the 2015 exhibition, “Just Gaming,” was selected as a Critics Pick.

          The gallery is open Mondays and Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m.; Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.; Thursdays from 1 to 4 p.m.; and Fridays from 2 to 4 p.m.

          Campus construction activity for the spring

          Campus Construction

          Campus maps show the facilities planning and construction project sites for 2017. The intent of the general map is to identify the locations and dates that will be affected, as well as identify the spring project.

          As always, some projects will affect pedestrian and vehicular movements more than others. Those projects will be supplemented with additional phasing and traffic plans.

          As projects progress, larger more detailed maps will be provided as needed to communicate details in advance of the changes. The two projects with the most impact on pedestrian and vehicular movements are the new residence hall and bookstore, and the Centennial Hall steam and condensate line replacement.

          Be a part of something bigger

          More than 2,000 volunteers, the Community Government Association's annual The Big Event has become the largest community service events Bloomsburg University holds. Each spring, student volunteers venture to more than 100 job sites across town and in local neighborhoods tackling a variety of needs fro raking, painting and cleaning.

          Sponsored by the CGA, the single-day community service event gives students the opportunity to say “thank you" to Bloomsburg area residents and show appreciation for the community we live, learn and work in.

          CGA Election Results

          The results are in! Congratulations to your newly elected 2017-18 CGA Executive Committee Officers.

        • President - Joar Dahn
        • Vice President - John Thomas
        • Treasurer - Austin Devlin
        • Secretary- Sarah Rhineer

        BU adds women's volleyball

        Women's Volleyball

        Bloomsburg University will add women's volleyball as a varsity sport to begin competitive play in the fall of 2018. The addition of the program will provide Huskies' student-athletes with more opportunities to compete, and succeed, in 10 men's varsity programs and 11 women's varsity programs at the University.

        "We are very excited about the addition of women's volleyball as an intercollegiate sport," said Bloomsburg University President Dr. David L. Soltz. "Volleyball fits with the mission of the University and aligns with the sports offered in our student recruitment area. I believe it will greatly enhance the student experience at BU."

        A nationwide search to hire a full-time women's volleyball coach will commence immediately.

        "The addition of women's volleyball will continue to bolster our recruitment efforts across the entire region," said Bloomsburg University Director of Athletics Dr. Michael McFarland. "We are privileged, with this announcement, to be able to provide another opportunity for women to play an intercollegiate varsity sport, and complement our existing sports, here at BU."

        Make-A-Wish CEO headlines summit

        Bloomsburg University will hold its 11th annual Husky Leadership Summit on Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Kehr Union Building, led by keynote speaker David Williams, president and CEO of the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

        The event is sponsored by the Bloomsburg University Alumni Association, the Center for Leadership and Engagement (CLE) and the Community Government Association. The Husky Student Leadership Summit is an annual leadership conference presented by BU alumni, faculty, staff and student leaders. The leadership summit is an opportunity for students to network with BU alumni, enhance their leadership skills, learn more about ways to get involved in campus life and engage in workshops for their CLE Leadership Certification.

        With a focus on professional development, participants will get the chance to engage in mock interviews, resume review sessions, personal branding consultation meetings, professional head shots, panel discussions, a career fair and a networking leadership luncheon.

        Daughter of Charleston church shooting victim speaks

        Sharon Washington Risher

        After dealing with the tragedy of losing loved ones to gun violence, Rev. Sharon Washington Risher will be discussing loss, faith and forgiveness in, “Tattered Pieces: A Charleston Daughter Explores” on Monday, March 6, at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall. This event is free and open to the public.

        After the Charleston, S.C., shooting at the Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church shooting in 2015, Risher was rushed into the spotlight after her mother - the church’s sexton- Ethel Lee Lance, two cousins, a childhood friend and five others were killed. Since the tragedy, Risher has been outspoken on the nation’s gun laws, becoming the national spokesperson for grassroots advocacy groups Everytown and Moms Demand Gun Sense.

        In her talk, Risher covers her personal experiences with losing loved ones to gun violence from this tragedy as well as racism and hate in America. She also discusses the path to forgiveness and hope for tomorrow.

        Risher graduated from Johnson C. Smith University and would later earn a Master of Divinity degree from the Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Texas. She has appeared multiple times on CNN and has been interviewed by Time Magazine, Marie-Claire, Essence, the Guardian and others. Risher has visited Barack Obama at the White House on several occasions and has been a guest speaker for several Martin Luther King Jr. memorial events. Currently, Risher travels the country as an activist and guest speaker.

        This event is presented by the Office of Multicultural Affairs and co-sponsored by the Women’s Resource Center and the Office of Diversity and Retention.

        Gain a professional edge through the Husky Summit

        Husky Summit

        From participant to a presenter, senior Sarah Bartra has worked towards becoming a professional through the annual Husky Student Leadership Summit. Bartra, a dual communication studies and biological allied health major with a Spanish minor, is an active leader as vice president of Community Government Association (CGA).

        Bartra first attended the Husky Summit her sophomore year and this year she will be presenting a panel alongside her fellow CGA student leaders. Besides having the honor to present, she wants to use all the tools available from the Center for Leadership and Engagement (CLE) and the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience (CPDCE) to students at the summit.

        During her experience last year, Bartra had a more workable resume and utilized the networking and professional opportunities available at the summit. Being able to mock interview with alumni in her prospective field and receive their feedback was beneficial to Bartra. Networking with student leaders and BU alumni was also helpful. Last year’s keynote speaker Hoan Do, motivational speaker from American Ninja Warrior, was a memorable moment for Bartra.

        “His speech was energizing,” Bartra says. “It set the tone for the rest of the day.”

        The 11th annual Husky Student Leadership Summit is Saturday, Feb. 25, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., featuring BU alumni David Williams, president and CEO of the Make-A-Wish foundation, as the keynote speaker.

        Ready to vote?

        This week, Bloomsburg University will be conducting a student referendum to reinstate the Student Union Building Fee and to ascertain their support for beginning the process to build a new student union.

        A potential new student union would be built on campus at the present site of the Warren Student Services Building. A new student union will provide space and facilities that enhance the out-of-classroom experiences that are hallmarks of a BU education. The design and functions of the building will encourage students and the campus community to utilize the building as a gathering hub and allow for dynamic programming.

        New KUB Project

        A Student Engagement Survey conducted spring semester, 2016 revealed only 5.6 percent of students believe Kehr Union Building meets their needs. The results of the survey align with the results of the University Facility Master Planning process completed spring semester, 2014 and with the Student Union Mini-Feasibility Study completed spring semester, 2012. The student referendum will take place this week, along with voting for the CGA Executive Board. Meet the Candidates!

        CGA exec elections underway

        CGA Elections

        Bloomsburg University’s Community Government Association (CGA) is holding its 2017-18 Executive Committee Elections this week. In addition to voting on a new student executive board, students will also vote on a referendum relating a new student union project. Voting will take place online, Tuesday through Thursday, Feb. 28 to March 2.

        Sarah Bartra, a senior and CGA vice president, joined the organization as a freshman and encourages other students to as well. The organization not only made the transition into college easier but also turned into a family for her.

        “I didn’t know what I was getting myself into starting out, but once I got involved it was such a cool experienced to be immersed in everything going on within the university,” Bartra said. “Being able to speak up as a student and have people actually listen was great.”

        Through CGA, Bartra gained a rich learning experience by working with the administration and on committees with professionals. Most importantly, she was able to voice other people’s opinions and allow them to be heard.

        “As vice president, I never knew I would have as much responsibility as I do now,” Bartra said. “There are always going to be challenges, but I feel like I’ve grown a lot since I’ve taken this position. I’ve learned how to take on situations that are social, personal and professional.”

        Student panel to discuss race, ethnicity and racism

        Centennial Hall

        Bloomsburg University's Institute for Culture and Society would like to welcome you to a Student Panel on Race, Ethnicity, and Racism next Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall 201 as part of the “Bloomsburg Explores Diversity” symposium.

        This event will be the first in a series of student panels over the next several weeks that will explore various topics of diversity and will engage the panelists and audience members in important conversations about diversity and difference.

        Moderator: Erin Brummett (Department of Communication Studies). Participants: Facia Sirleaf, Johnson Aubyn, Monica Abdalmessih, Alexis Mendoza, Quadirah Locus, Ian M. Severson.

        Film series continues on security and surveillance

        Ongoing campus film series continues Thursday, March 2 at 5:30 p.m. in Hartline Center's Kuster Auditorium with the screening of (T)ERROR, the first documentary shot during an active FBI counterterrorism sting operation. Saeed Torres, a former Black Panther who became a paid FBI informant gathers intelligence on Khalifah al-Akili, an American convert to Islam from Pittsburgh. Winner of several awards including the Special Jury Prize in Sundance Film Festival (2015), (T)error was hailed as “One of the best documentaries of 2015” by Newsweek.

        This is the third documentary in a series of screenings that focus on political economy of security and surveillance. The series aims to initiate a discussion on the intended and unintended consequences of policy decisions in our current environment dominated by fear. This fear becomes particularly obvious in our efforts to identify and eliminate “threats” abroad and here.

        The fourth and fifth documentaries, National Bird on March 30 and The Lab on April 20 will explore how we and the rest of the world deal with these challenges and threats through weapons. Contact M. Safa Saraçoglu associate professor of history, at msaracog@bloomu.edu for more information.

        We make it personal

        It's Personal

        As we enter the homestretch of our university’s largest ever capital campaign, we are calling on you, our faculty and staff, to help us finish strong by participating in the We make it Personal Faculty and Staff Campaign.

        It is now easier than ever for faculty and staff to support the area of our university about which you are most passionate. Every gift — no matter the size — makes a difference.

        Bloomsburg University prides itself on providing educational experiences that transform lives. Our graduates — many first-generation college students from across Pennsylvania and beyond — point to their experiences at BU as setting the course for future accomplishments.

        There is an amazing momentum at BU. We’re different than we were even a decade ago: greater in number, broader in programs, more engaged with our community and world. Still, we passionately hold on to who we are and remain committed to what we do best: preparing students for personal and professional success.

        BU Players present production of “Harvey”

        The Bloomsburg University Players will premiere their spring season with Mary Chase’s comedy “Harvey.” The play, directed by assistant professor of theatre David Miller, will run Wednesday, March 1, through Sunday, March 5, at the Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center St., Bloomsburg. Show time on Wednesday-Saturday is 7:30 p.m. with show time on Sunday is 3 p.m.

        “Harvey” follows Elwood P. Dowd and his best friend Harvey, a seemingly invisible anthropomorphic six-foot-one-and-a-half-inch rabbit. Not everyone is happy to have Harvey around, including Elwood’s social climbing sister Veta Louise, who is determined to commit him to a sanitarium. “Harvey” won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1945.

        The 12 member cast includes Emily Henderson, Carly Carman, Titus O’Neil, Kayla McGarry, Kendall Baird and Kate Mochnacz. Also, Josué Nieves, Nate Stosius, Jonathan Schultz, Madeline Okuniewski, Austyn Redwinski, and Chris Thorne.

        Tickets are free for BU students with student ID, $6 for adults and $4 for seniors and students. Advance tickets may be purchased at the Haas Center box office or at the door one hour before curtain time.

        President Soltz receives higher ed award

        David Soltz

        David L. Soltz, president of Bloomsburg University, was honored with the Pennsylvania Black Conference on Higher Education (PBCOHE) Presidents’ Award on Friday, Feb. 24 in Pittsburgh. The conference, first convened in 1971, was organized by Pennsylvania Speaker of the House Rep. K. Leroy Irvis, his aide Mary Davis Baltimore, and black educators from across the state. Soltz was recognized for his policies and actions that demonstrate commitment and dedication to enhancing the mission of the PBCOHE.

        Under Soltz’s leadership, the university increased enrollment of under-represented minority students from 10 percent to more than 17 percent. In addition, there has been an increase in the number of administrators, faculty, and staff of color hired and retained at BU during his tenure. He supported student participation in the PBCOHE Student Leadership Development Institute as well as faculty and staff participation in the Educational Management and Leadership Institute.

        Soltz will retire from Bloomsburg University in June 2017, after nine and a half years. As president, he has served on the board of directors of the American Association of State College and Universities (AASCU) and as vice chair of AASCU Policies and Purposes Committee; led accreditation site team visits for the Middle States Commission on Higher Education; served as chair of the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference; and was the State System of Higher Education presidential representative in the collective bargaining negotiations with the Association for Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties (APSCUF).

        Soltz earned a bachelor's degree in zoology from the University of California, Berkeley, and a doctoral degree in biology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

        The Voice lands six awards at Gold Circle competition

        The Voice

        Results of the 2016 Gold Circle competition are in, and staff members at The Voice have received have six individual awards for their articles, photos, and page design from Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Their work was chosen from among the 6,420 entries submitted by colleges and universities from across the United states. Voice members claimed two First Place awards, two Third Place awards, and two Certificates of Merit.

        First Place in Entertainment Reviews went to Joshua Lloyd, current Arts Editor, for his article “Urie Bids Farewell.” First Place in page design for a Cultural Feature Page went to Vanessa Giedosh, former Arts Editor, for her April 14 page design.

        Third Place in Personal Opinion Writing, Off-Campus Issues, went to Morgan Mickavicz, current Asst. Opinion Editor, for her political column, “Flush Prejudice.” The Staff as a whole also share a Third Place in Headline Writing for an entry of five of their top headlines.

        A Certificate of Merit in Sports Commentary was awarded to Evin Hartsock, current Sports Editor, for his column “Eagles Look to Soar.” Cole Kresch, former Photo Editor, who graduated in 2016, also won a Certificate of Merit for his front-page photo story, “Big Event Cleans House.”

        Current editor of The Voice is Ioannis Pashakis. Adviser is Mary Bernath, professor of English.

        Columbia Scholastic Press Association, founded in 1925, serves editors who produce student newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and online media from high schools and colleges throughout the United States. Its goal is to foster high standards in student journalism and to recognize quality work. It is owned and operated by Columbia University.

        Alumna to speak on social activism

        Fatima Maruta

        Fatima Maruta virtually returns to Bloomsburg University for International Women’s Day where she will discuss “Start Locally, Act Globally.” on Wednesday, March 8, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in KUB Ballroom. Admission is free and open to the public.

        Maruta will discuss her journey to establish the Rose of Sharon Welfare Organization in Zimbabwe. The Organization provides shelter, food, education and health care, social amenities and recreation to orphans in need.

        Before traveling to the United States of America and graduating with a master’s degree in Business Administration from BU in 1997, Maruta enrolled for a Higher National Diploma in Accounting from Harare Polytechnic in Zimbabwe. She later matriculated to the University of Zimbabwe where she earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting.

        She held several accounting posts in public and private institutions before joining the University of Zimbabwe where she lectured for six years and chaired the School of Accountancy. She then joined the UNAIDS as Projects Accountant for HIV/Aids Programs. She left in 2005 to form the Rose of Sharon Welfare Organization.

        The event is sponsored by the Office of Global and Multicultural Education, the Office of Alumni and Professional Engagement, and the Women’s Resource Center.

        Wilderness First Aid Offered

        Wilderness First Aid

        Bloomsburg University’s Quest Outdoor Leadership Program is offering a Wilderness First Aid/Wilderness First Responder Recertification course. The two-day class is on Saturday-Sunday, April 29-30 at Monty’s on Bloomsburg University’s upper campus. Registration deadline is Friday, March 10.

        This introductory level course is designed to introduce first aid and patient care in remote locations for outdoor leaders, guides, hunters or anyone who spends times in the woods. Topics include, but are not limited to wound management and infection, realigning fractures and dislocations, improvised splinting techniques, patient monitoring and long-term management problems.

        Participants will receive a two-year Wilderness First Aid certification through the Wilderness Medicine Institute of the National Outdoor Leadership School after completion of the course. All levels of training and experience are welcome.

        Survey seeks opinions of first year students, seniors

        NSSE Survey

        First-year and senior classes are invited to share opinions about their experiences at Bloomsburg University by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement.

        The survey reveals students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results are used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

        In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey will automatically be entered into a random drawing to win one of 84 prizes: one $150 Amazon gift card, one of two $100 Amazon gift cards, one of nine $50 Amazon gift cards, one of three BU tailgate folding chairs, one of three BU stadium blankets, one of six BU travel mugs, one of five BU smartphone power banks, one of seven BU drawstring bags, one of 20 BU spirit flags, or one of 28 BU iPod armband holders. A student’s chances of winning depend on how many students complete the survey; the last time the survey was administered, 635 students responded making a student’s odds of winning roughly 1 in 8.

        “All student responses are valuable for helping us compare the experiences they report with those of students at hundreds of other colleges and universities,” said Sheila Jones, assistant VP for the Office of Planning and Assessment. “The results will also indicate important trends in undergraduate education. More voices will make results more valid.”

        STEM project advances to Governor’s competition

        STEM Projects

        Concepts ranging from a pill dispenser for prescribed medication to a sleep saver app for students to a deer inhibitor device to enhance highway safety were among the creative ideas drawn up by Bloomsburg University’s STEM Magnet Program over winter break.

        Their work, which included six small group projects, culminated with a judged campus competition to pick the best idea for the Regional PA Governor’s STEM Competition this week at the Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit (CSIU) in Milton.

        The winner — The Coal Refuse Block: a five-by-nine-inch block used to recycle coal refuse. According to their proposal, the block would be solely made of coal refuse with the exception of its steel mold. The product would be cheap, stable and environmentally friendly.

        FOCUS begins March with campus visit

        Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia, for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, March 5, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and blessings of spring.

        Through culturally relevant activities and events, and biblical discipleship F.O.C.U.S. promotes Godly unity amongst young adults. In addition to activities and events such as F.O.C.U.S Friday (monthly Bible Study) and “Keeping it 100” (a group meeting and safe space for young adult men). F.O.C.U.S is also actively involved in community service and outreach initiatives. BU's Gospel Choir will be performing at Campus Church.

        Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods, coordinator of minority affairs, at 570-389-4091 for details.

        CAS presents The Ballroom Thieves, The Suffers

        Boston alternative folk band, The Ballroom Thieves, will be the opening act for The Suffers on Sunday, Feb. 26 at 7:30 p.m. in Bloomsburg University’s Celebrity Artist Series.

        The Ballroom Thieves, a three piece alternative folk/pop band describes themselves as “having a certain sound at the moment, but a sound that is constantly evolving; and (we) hope it keeps doing that.” The Thieves exhibit a blend of acoustic styles that explore the basics of folk and pop music while at the same time rejecting their restrictions.

        Guitarist Martin Earley, cellist Calin Peters and drummer Devin Mauch discovered right away that life on the road for a burgeoning band is easily glamorized from the joy of playing a show, the wonder of encountering new places and people and the stories that amass. However, the lifestyle can also be trying: the isolation of a van, the misery of being separated from home and loved ones and the unspoken grievances that stack tensions high. For The Ballroom Thieves, this theme became their album.

        Educator to headline Sankofa

        Educator and motivator Jamal Johnson will be the keynote speaker at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s annual Sankofa Conference. Presented by BU’s Multicultural Center, the conference will take place on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in KUB Ballroom. Also, a “Survivor’s Guilt” workshop will be presented by Muhibb Dyer.

        Sankofa

        Working in the field of education for the past 16 years, Johnson serves now as the Assistant Director for Mentoring and Retention at his alma mater. After graduating from the College of New Jersey in 2001, he began his career as an elementary school teacher in the East Orange and Plainfield Public School Systems. In higher education, he has worked in Residential Education, Admissions, and Multicultural Recruitment.

        Dyer, a community activist, poet and co-founder of Flood the Hood Dreams, has performed throughout the United States and was a finalist in 2002 at the National Poetry Slam.

        The Office of Multicultural Affairs’ Sankofa Conference, grew out of the need for students to learn, understand, and appreciate the rich cultural heritage of people of African descent. It has developed as a way to promote unity and understanding among students, providing a forum for discussion and learning.

        Are you the next student trustee?

        Carver Hall

        Bloomsburg University's Council of Trustees is accepting applications for the position of student trustee now through Feb. 17. Students applying for the position should be a full time undergraduate student who is at least a second semester freshman and no more than a second semester junior. Candidates must be in good academic standing and be able to serve through May of 2018.

        As a student trustee, the selected student has a unique opportunity to represent his/her peers in all Council of Trustees meetings and Community Government Association, executive and senate, meetings. The student trustee aids the Council of Trustees, President, and Chancellor in making decisions regarding the University’s student life, academic programs, admissions, budgets, and university relations.

        Katherine Mullen, the outgoing student trustee, is a junior chemistry major. As the student trustee for the last two years has provided Mullen with many experiences, connections, networking opportunities, and privileges that has helped her grow, not only as a BU student but as a person as well. Student Trustees have opportunities to speak at graduation ceremonies, attend donor dinners and award ceremonies that add to their college experience.

        Mullen says about her fellow trustees, “I personally love listening to fellow trustees ask questions at meetings,” said Mullen. “All of them have years of professional experience that I, as a 21-year-old, cannot relate to. However, I am able to gain bits of wisdom by recognizing the experiences behind the questions they ask. Each time I interact with the trustees I walk away smiling. They are excited about the path I have chosen in life and are supportive of what I intend to do after I graduate.”

        Students interested in being a student trustee should contact Jennifer Williams in the President’s office at (570) 389-4523 or jwilliam@bloomu.edu. Applications are due by 4 p.m. on Friday, Feb.17.

        Gain a professional edge through the Husky Summit

        Husky Summit

        From participant to a presenter, senior Sarah Bartra has worked towards becoming a professional through the annual Husky Student Leadership Summit. Bartra, a dual communication studies and biological allied health major with a Spanish minor, is an active leader as vice president of Community Government Association (CGA).

        Bartra first attended the Husky Summit her sophomore year and this year she will be presenting a panel alongside her fellow CGA student leaders. Besides having the honor to present, she wants to use all the tools available from the Center for Leadership and Engagement (CLE) and the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience (CPDCE) to students at the summit.

        During her experience last year, Bartra had a more workable resume and utilized the networking and professional opportunities available at the summit. Being able to mock interview with alumni in her prospective field and receive their feedback was beneficial to Bartra. Networking with student leaders and BU alumni was also helpful. Last year’s keynote speaker Hoan Do, motivational speaker from American Ninja Warrior, was a memorable moment for Bartra.

        “His speech was energizing,” Bartra says. “It set the tone for the rest of the day.”

        The 11th annual Husky Student Leadership Summit is Saturday, Feb. 25, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., featuring BU alumni David Williams, president and CEO of the Make-A-Wish foundation, as the keynote speaker.

        11th annual Husky Student Leadership Summit

        This free day-long student leadership conference with alumni is sponsored by Alumni and Professional Engagement, CLE and CGA. This year’s theme is “Leaders United.” Keynote speaker — David Williams, president and CEO of the Make-A-Wish Foundation — is a 1981 accounting graduate and former member of the men’s tennis team.

        Throughout the conference, students are encouraged to attend various CLE leadership certification program workshops, roundtable discussions with alumni, the leadership networking luncheon and CPDCE, where they can get a professional headshot taken, engage in a mock interview, have resumes reviewed, discuss post grad opportunities and learn ways to brand themselves as a leader and a rising professional. To register, visit the Husky Summit portal on Husky Sync!

        Job shadow brings career options into focus

        Catherine Garrity

        Catherine Garrity loves the creative edge marketing brings out in people and saw that firsthand through her recent job shadowing experience at Altitude Marking, an integrated B2B marketing agency in Emmaus.

        “I love working with others to combine interests and ideas,” explained Garrity, a junior business management major with a minor in marketing.

        Garrity was introduced to Altitude Marketing through her dad, owner of Compass Point, a consulting company for small businesses. Altitude Marketing was a past client of his, so she reached out to Andrew Stanten, president of the company.

        “He spoke very highly of his business and employees, and I could feel his passion for both,” Garrity said. “This was my first experience shadowing with an advertising agency, so it was something I was particularly excited about.”

        According to Garrity, the job shadow actually opened her eyes to an added career aspect to marketing. After speaking to Altitude’s public relations team, she began to envision a career path involving PR. She spent the day around several projects the team had worked on, including social media and writing.

        Through BU’s business program and the American University of Rome, a study abroad program, Garrity believes the courses she has completed have challenged and prepared her for the future in more than one way. She has developed strong writing and creativity skills, and has learned new limits.

        “This program has required me to step out of my comfort zone and do things I didn’t think I could do, such as creating marketing plans and advertising products for different companies,” said Garrity, adding through job shadowing her future career path is coming into focus.

        FOCUS celebrates Black History Month with campus visit

        Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia, for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Feb. 19, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and blessings in honor of Black History Month.

        Through culturally relevant activities and events, and biblical discipleship F.O.C.U.S. promotes Godly unity amongst young adults. In addition to activities and events such as F.O.C.U.S Friday (monthly Bible Study) and “Keeping it 100” (a group meeting and safe space for young adult men). F.O.C.U.S is also actively involved in community service and outreach initiatives.

        Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods, coordinator of minority affairs, at 570-389-4091 for details.

        CAS to begin spring performances

        Music’s biggest night of the year, The Grammy Awards, aired live last night on CBS. Bloomsburg University's Celebrity Artist Series congratulates upcoming campus performer Blind Boys of Alabama on their two Grammy nominations.

        One of the most recognized gospel roots music groups in the world, The Blind Boys of Alabama have been performing for 70 years and have already won five Grammy’s. Their current song “Mothers Children Have a Hard Time” was nominated for Best American Roots Performance. They were also nominated for Best Roots Gospel Album for their contributions to the various artist album, “God Don’t Ever Change: The Songs of Blind Willie Johnson."

        The Blind Boys of Alabama will take the stage for CAS on March 25. Preceding them on Sunday, Feb. 26, will be the Houston based ‘fusion-funk’ band; The Suffers along with opening artists; Ballroom Thieves.

        Tickets are available online at www.cas.buzz, at the Haas Center Box Office or by calling 570-389-4409.

        FDI hosts “Dare to Ask” founder to speak

        Phillip Milano, founder of Y? The National Forum on People’s Differences, will present “Dare to Ask”, a lecture on how to love and respect others by learning everything about them on Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 7 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium in Carver Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

        Milano believes, curious students are better students, and encourages people to ask unflinching, politically incorrect questions about racial, cultural, and sexual differences. This helps individuals overcome fears of offending and gain greater understanding of one another. Milano, a 30-year journalist and 25-year newspaper veteran, has been featured on CBS, CNN, BET, BBC, and numerous newspapers such as, The Washington Post, New York Times, and USA Today. He is the author of the book, “I can’t Believe You Asked That!” and a writer for the newspaper column, “Dare to Ask.”

        The, “Dare to Ask” lecture is sponsored by the Fredrick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence.

        A memorable learning experience for Douglass LC

        Learning Communities foster a unique learning environment for students with similar majors, interests and goals living together on campus and experiencing a variety of learning opportunities in and out of the classroom.

        One of the more active communities is the Frederick Douglass LLC, which regularly takes educational trips. This past fall, they traveled to Virginia to visit Belle Grove Plantation — an authentic late 18th-century plantation house and estate. For one student with a special connection to the LLC, the overnight trip left a lasting impression.

        “My uncle did research and found out we were related to Frederick Douglass,” said Marqueshay Tomlinson, a freshman nursing major, admitting she really wants to learn more about her ancestry.

        Tomlinson said this trip stuck out to her the most when she saw the list of LLC activities early in the semester given to her by her advisor, Brian Johnson, director of BU’s Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence. Tomlinson’s initial reaction was, “Wow… a slave plantation, oh my goodness!”

        BUSVA discovers new potential via NatCon experience

        Student Veterans National Conference

        For the first time ever, Bloomsburg University achieved silver level as a Military Friendly School this fall from Victory Media. It’s a status the BU Student Veterans Association (BUSVA) not only takes pride in but is working to do even better.

        This past winter break a group of BUSVA members started doing just that by attending the 9th annual Student Veterans National Conference — the largest annual gathering of service members, veterans, advocates, thought-leader, stakeholders, and supporters in higher education in the world.

        “It is a gathering of all these individuals for the common purpose of improving the transition of students from the military to college, keeping military students in college, and creating the best possible opportunity for student veterans after college,” said Matthew Haberle, president of BUSVA, who along with fellow members were among more than 1,500 conference participants.

        According to Haberle, they attended NatCon to learn how to improve veteran benefits on campus and how BUSVA can better themselves by working with other student organizations and bring in new information about jobs and post-graduate opportunities for veteran students.

        "Early America" exhibit in Haas Gallery

        Early America

        Sculptor Lewis Colburn will launch the Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania spring art exhibition series with his work titled “Early America” at the Haas Gallery of Art from Wednesday, Feb. 8, through Thursday, March 9. There will be an opening reception on Feb. 8 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The show is free and open to the public.

        Colburn’s “Early America” show focuses on how objects can be used to re-tell and re-interpret the past through current experience. Colburn is interested in how we choose and neglect narratives through historical replications and how the act of re-telling the past can manifest itself as the object.

        Colburn earned bachelor’s degrees in studio art and Russian language at St. Olaf College and received a Master of Fine Arts in sculpture from Syracuse University. His work has exhibited across the United States in places like Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and throughout upstate New York. Colburn is a member of NAPOLEON, an artist-run project space in Philadelphia’s Rollins Building.

        Forensics Team kicks off spring season

        Speech and Debate Team

        Bloomsburg University’s Forensics Team kicked off its spring season with a fourth place finish out of seven teams at the Annual Collegiate Forensic Association’s Speech and Debate Tournament in Clearwater Beach, Fla.

        Five of the 13 forensics competitors won speech and debate awards. Among them was Jayleen Alvarado, a senior political science major, who is also studying pre-law.

        “I enjoy having a platform where I can speak professionally about issues that plague this country,” said Alvarado, adding the forensics team great fit for students who enjoy traveling, meaningful conversations, and good friends. “I enjoy hearing perspectives that I am not familiar with and may not align with my own. I do not believe ignorance is bliss, if there is an opinion that is based on reason that supersedes my own, it is worth listening to; it is worth discussing.”

        Alvarado was proud of the team’s performance in Florida. According to her, the team has provided her with the professional development skills necessary to compete in highly competitive work fields upon graduation. Public speaking was never a fear — but her oral, written, and research skills have heightened substantially regardless.

        Annual CFA’s Speech and Debate Tournament

        • Abbey Porambo: 1st Poetry; 1st Informative Speaking; 1st Dramatic Duo with Jayleen Alvarado; 2nd After Dinner Speaking; 2nd Best Parliamentary Debate Speaker; 5th Single Dramatic Interpretation; 3rd Pentathlon
        • Lucelis Ortega: 6th Poetry; 6th Declamation
        • Anna Scott: 2nd Persuasive Speaking
        • Jayleen Alvarado: 1st Dramatic Duo with Abbey Porambo; 5th Parliamentary debate with Tobias Sonnenberg; 6th Communication Analysis
        • Tobias Sonnenberg: 5th Parliamentary Debate with Jayleen Alvarado

        Wilkes University Invitational Speech and Debate Tournament

        • Deanna Campion: 5th Parliamentary Debate with Cameron Ostrowski; 6th Prose
        • Cameron Ostrowski: 5th Parliamentary Debate with Deanna Campion; 6th Best Speaker Award in Parliamentary Debate
        • Katarina Solovey: 5th Declamation; 6th Informative
        • Amy Bitar: 2nd Parliamentary Debate with Jayleen Alvarado; 3rd Declamation; 5th Best Speaker in Parliamentary Debate
        • Jayleen Alvarado: 2nd Parliamentary Debate; 3rd Best Speaker in Parliamentary Debate

        New scholarship search launched

        Scholarship Application Process

        Students will no longer need to scroll through a long list of scholarships and complete multiple paper applications that need to be turned into each department. Instead complete ONE application to automatically apply to multiple scholarships.

        Deadline for current students to complete the 2017-18 Scholarship Application online is March 1. Incoming freshman have until April 1.

        Students can find the application instructions on the scholarship website’s main page before logging in. Students can find the link to the scholarship website on their MyHusky account under the To Do List.

        Department committees will be provided with detailed instructions and training in the near future. Committee members will see a list of scholarships they are responsible for awarding upon logging on. Each scholarship will display a spreadsheet of eligible applicants including their answers from the scholarship application and data imported from MyHusky. Committee members will be able to sort and rank applicants and select recipients online.

        The financial aid office and BU Foundation, Inc., will view the selected recipients online, a list of recipients does not need to be emailed or put in campus mail anymore. The scholarship awards will be posted to student’s financial aid records and the students will receive an email notification of the award.

        Financial aid processing

        BU’s Bursar Office will begin processing financial aid on Thursday, Feb. 2. Students who have signed up for financial aid refund direct deposit via their student account will have their refunds deposited to their designated account within two business days of the email notification from the Bursar Office.

        For those students who have not signed up for direct deposit, financial aid refund checks will be mailed to the student’s registered home address. There is still time to enroll in the direct deposit option by logging into your MyHusky account.

        Students will be notified by email of their disbursement.

        A symbolic arrival for a final semester

        Rachel Cimera

        Rachel Ann Cimera is a senior Chinese major with a minor in political science who is spending her final semester as a undergraduate this spring studying abroad at the renowned Beijing Normal University, a public research university in China with strong emphasis on basic disciplines of humanities and sciences.

        "My arrival will be after one of the major holidays in China, the Chinese New Year also known as the Spring Festival. This happens during what is called the春运 Chunyun period, which occurs 15 days prior to the Lunar New Year. Fortunately for all of the Rooster born individuals, their year, 2017 has come."

        Discover. Explore. Experience!

        • Thinking about study abroad? — discover your path at the upcoming Study Abroad Open House on Thursday, Feb. 2, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., KUB Multipurpose B. Let us help you get started. Making the memories is up to you!
        • Celebrate the Chinese New Year — Sunday, Feb. 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom with food, dance and music. Sponsored by the Chinese Student Association, the Chinese Club, and the Office of Global and Multicultural Education.
        • Study in China this summer! — May 21 through June 11, explore Beijing, visit major cultural and historic sites including Forbidden City, Great Wall, Tiananmen Square, traditional and modern neighborhoods, gift stores and more. Taste authentic Chinese foods, learn Taichi, cooking and martial arts in cultural lectures. Learn Chinese and communicate with Chinese students and people on the streets! Earn 6 credits toward graduation in Chinese 101 and Chinese 211 Foundations of Chinese Civilization (carrying 3 GEPs). Both courses satisfy Chinese Minor requirement.

        Travel grant scholarship for student research

        BU's Global Awareness Society International is offering, on a competitive basis, $500 travel grant scholarships to students who wish to present their re-search at the 26th Annual Conference in Heredia, Costa Rica, from May 25 to 27, with optional educational programs May 28 and May 29. Requirements are:

        • Student must be a BU student or a May 2017 graduate.
        • Individual paper presentations are given top priority.
        • Paper can be in any discipline and should be related to the conference theme, Global Inequity and Human Rights
        • First time applicants are given preference.
        • Student must submit at abstract to the GASI office in 128 Andruss by Feb. 15
        • Awards are made at the Awards Dinner on May 27 at the conclusion of the conference. Contact James C. Pomfret, Andruss Library 128, at gasi@bloomu.edu.

          Wilderness First Aid Offered

          Wilderness First Aid

          Bloomsburg University’s Quest Outdoor Leadership Program is offering a Wilderness First Aid/Wilderness First Responder Recertification course. The two-day class is on Saturday-Sunday, April 29-30 at Monty’s on Bloomsburg University’s upper campus. Registration deadline is Friday, March 10.

          This introductory level course is designed to introduce first aid and patient care in remote locations for outdoor leaders, guides, hunters or anyone who spends times in the woods. Topics include, but are not limited to wound management and infection, realigning fractures and dislocations, improvised splinting techniques, patient monitoring and long-term management problems.

          Participants will receive a two-year Wilderness First Aid certification through the Wilderness Medicine Institute of the National Outdoor Leadership School after completion of the course. All levels of training and experience are welcome.

          Immigration documentary to be screened

          With immigration policies in the news recently, Bloomsburg University will show the documentary “Barzan” on Thursday, Feb. 16, at 5:30 p.m. in Kuster Auditorium in Hartline Science Center. The screening is open free to the public.

          "Barzan” is a documentary that brings light to the complex struggle of asylum-seeking individuals from the Middle East. An Iraqi refugee was a model citizen until he was connected to a high-level Al-Qaeda member through his childhood nickname, “Barzan.” The story embodies the controversial issues of immigration, xenophobia and the price of modern security as a man and his family get torn apart by government suspicion.

          This is the second documentary in a series of screenings that focus on political economy of security and surveillance. The series aims to initiate a discussion on the intended and unintended consequences of policy decisions in the current environment dominated by fear.

          CVPA hosts annual ‘Taste of the Arts’

          Taste of the Arts

          Featuring works by students and faculty, Bloomsburg University’s Center for Visual and Performing Arts will host its annual Taste of the Arts event on Saturday, Feb. 11. There will be an afternoon of art and entertainment from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Caldwell Consistory in downtown Bloomsburg. This event is free and open to the public.

          A Taste of the Arts features art exhibitions and demonstrations as well as live performances from the music, theatre and dance department. Mass communications students will display their video editing projects and creative writing students will read their original works throughout the afternoon. Visitors can attend any portion of the three-hour program. Light refreshments will also be served.

          Bloomsburg University departments involved include art and art history, English, mass communications, music, theatre and dance. This event is sponsored by the Center for Visual and Performing Arts and the College of Liberal Arts. The annual Taste of the Arts event is intended to share the work of the Center of Visual and Performing Arts with the community.

          Are you career ready?

          In today's competitive job market, employers are looking for more than just good grades. They want a clean, concise resume, an applicant who shows up prepared and confident, someone who articulates why they are a good candidate for the organization and an employee who performs in a professional manner.

          Seniors and juniors will learn how to leverage skills and experiences to be successful in the transition from student to professional by attending a Career Intensive Boot Camp this weekend at the Greenly Center. Attendees will participate in 20-plus unique sessions to include Compensation Considerations, Debunking the "Career Path" Myth, and The Shocking Truth of Getting Hired. Craig R. Shuey, chief operating officer for the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission and an alumnus, will be the keynote speaker at the career boot camp.

          Putting the you in Professional U

          • CPDCE Open House — Feb. 15, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. "Let what you love be what you do." A great quote but how do you get there?
          • Career Intensive Boot Camp — March 3 to 5. A weekend experience for seniors, juniors and recent graduates to learn how to leverage your skills and experiences to get a job.
          • Career Connections Expo — April 7, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. All majors seeking job opportunities for all industries in one location at Nelson Field House, along with internship and job shadowing opportunities.

          "Early America" exhibit in Haas Gallery

          Early America

          Sculptor Lewis Colburn will launch the Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania spring art exhibition series with his work titled “Early America” at the Haas Gallery of Art from Wednesday, Feb. 8, through Thursday, March 9. There will be an opening reception on Feb. 8 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The show is free and open to the public.

          Colburn’s “Early America” show focuses on how objects can be used to re-tell and re-interpret the past through current experience. Colburn is interested in how we choose and neglect narratives through historical replications and how the act of re-telling the past can manifest itself as the object.

          Colburn earned bachelor’s degrees in studio art and Russian language at St. Olaf College and received a Master of Fine Arts in sculpture from Syracuse University. His work has exhibited across the United States in places like Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and throughout upstate New York. Colburn is a member of NAPOLEON, an artist-run project space in Philadelphia’s Rollins Building.

          University book read for Women's History Month

          University Read

          To celebrate Women’s History Month, the Zeigler College of Business and Women’s Resource Center will sponsor a keynote speech on March 23 by Joann Lublin, a journalist with the Wall Street Journal. Joann’s recent book titled Earning It: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World chronicles the careers of 50 successful women executives.

          Three faculty — Laura Davis (business law), Megumi Omori (sociology), and Victoria Geyfman (finance) — will hold a “university read” for interested faculty, staff, and students. Participants will meet several times before March 23 to share what they have learned about the author, book, and key issues about women at work.

          Those who participate in the “university read” will be invited to a personal lunch with Joann Lublin and her husband before the keynote speech. Joann will personally sign books at the luncheon and after her talk. Participants can pick up their copy on Tuesday, Feb. 14, at 4:30 p.m. in McCormick Center 3237. There will be a brief introduction to the book, handout some questions to consider while reading the book.

          Sankofa Conference

          Sankofa

          Bloomsburg University's annual Sankofa Conference will feature Jamal Johnson, educator and motivator, along with Muhibb Dyer, community activist, poet and co-founder of Flood the Hood Dreams, on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom.

          Established the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Sankofa Conference grew out of the need for students to learn, understand, and appreciate the rich cultural heritage of people of African descent. The conference has developed as a way to promote unity and understanding among students and to provide a forum for discussion and learning.

          Johnson who has worked in the field of education for the past 16 years, will serve as the keynote speaker presenting, "Just Like Music." Dyer, who has performed throughout the United States and was a finalist in 2002 at the National Poetry Slam, will lead a workshop with students on “Survivor Guilt.”

          In higher education Johnson has worked in residential education, admissions, multicultural recruitment and now serves as the assistant director for mentoring and retention at his alma mater, The College of New Jersey. He recognizes the call on his life to empower others and applies the famous words of the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King to everything he does.

          “If I can help somebody as I pass along, if I can cheer somebody with a word or song, if I can show somebody he’s traveling wrong, then my living will not be in vain," Johnson says. "If I can do my duty as a Christian ought, if I can bring salvation to a world once wrought, if I can spread the message as the master taught, then my living will not be in vain.”

          The conference is free for students but registration required by Friday, Feb. 10, at the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

          Forensics Team kicks off spring season

          Speech and Debate Team

          Bloomsburg University’s Forensics Team kicked off its spring season with a fourth place finish out of seven teams at the Annual Collegiate Forensic Association’s Speech and Debate Tournament in Clearwater Beach, Fla.

          Five of the 13 forensics competitors won speech and debate awards. Among them was Jayleen Alvarado, a senior political science major, who is also studying pre-law.

          “I enjoy having a platform where I can speak professionally about issues that plague this country,” said Alvarado, adding the forensics team great fit for students who enjoy traveling, meaningful conversations, and good friends. “I enjoy hearing perspectives that I am not familiar with and may not align with my own. I do not believe ignorance is bliss, if there is an opinion that is based on reason that supersedes my own, it is worth listening to; it is worth discussing.”

          Alvarado was proud of the team’s performance in Florida. According to her, the team has provided her with the professional development skills necessary to compete in highly competitive work fields upon graduation. Public speaking was never a fear — but her oral, written, and research skills have heightened substantially regardless.

          Annual CFA’s Speech and Debate Tournament

          • Abbey Porambo: 1st Poetry; 1st Informative Speaking; 1st Dramatic Duo with Jayleen Alvarado; 2nd After Dinner Speaking; 2nd Best Parliamentary Debate Speaker; 5th Single Dramatic Interpretation; 3rd Pentathlon
          • Lucelis Ortega: 6th Poetry; 6th Declamation
          • Anna Scott: 2nd Persuasive Speaking
          • Jayleen Alvarado: 1st Dramatic Duo with Abbey Porambo; 5th Parliamentary debate with Tobias Sonnenberg; 6th Communication Analysis
          • Tobias Sonnenberg: 5th Parliamentary Debate with Jayleen Alvarado

          Wilkes University Invitational Speech and Debate Tournament

          • Deanna Campion: 5th Parliamentary Debate with Cameron Ostrowski; 6th Prose
          • Cameron Ostrowski: 5th Parliamentary Debate with Deanna Campion; 6th Best Speaker Award in Parliamentary Debate
          • Katarina Solovey: 5th Declamation; 6th Informative
          • Amy Bitar: 2nd Parliamentary Debate with Jayleen Alvarado; 3rd Declamation; 5th Best Speaker in Parliamentary Debate
          • Jayleen Alvarado: 2nd Parliamentary Debate; 3rd Best Speaker in Parliamentary Debate

          BUSVA discovers new potential via NatCon experience

          Student Veterans National Conference

          For the first time ever, Bloomsburg University achieved silver level as a Military Friendly School this fall from Victory Media. It’s a status the BU Student Veterans Association (BUSVA) not only takes pride in but is working to do even better.

          This past winter break a group of BUSVA members started doing just that by attending the 9th annual Student Veterans National Conference — the largest annual gathering of service members, veterans, advocates, thought-leader, stakeholders, and supporters in higher education in the world.

          “It is a gathering of all these individuals for the common purpose of improving the transition of students from the military to college, keeping military students in college, and creating the best possible opportunity for student veterans after college,” said Matthew Haberle, president of BUSVA, who along with fellow members were among more than 1,500 conference participants.

          According to Haberle, they attended NatCon to learn how to improve veteran benefits on campus and how BUSVA can better themselves by working with other student organizations and bring in new information about jobs and post-graduate opportunities for veteran students.

          Speaker to confront fear in upcoming talk

          Lisa Bryant

          Consultant Lisa Bryant will tackle the topic of fear in “Get the ‘F’ (Fear) Out of Here” at Bloomsburg University on Monday, Feb. 13 in the Multicultural Center starting at 6 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

          In this interactive session, various techniques are used to explore the effects of fear and intimidation on leadership and all who follow them. Attendees will examine the differences between fear and intimidation, identify the symptoms as well as gain strategies to combat them. Bryant is the president and CEO of LBAFG Consulting and co-owner of His Vision Productions, LLC. She earned a B.S. in liberal studies with a music education minor from West Chester University. She also holds a B.A and M.A. in theology from Jameson College and is an ordained pastor.

          With more than 30 years of experience working with Greek life culture and 26 years of professional experience in training and education, she has shared her expertise with various organizations including the Vanguard Group, PNC Bank and AIG. She was a certified trainer at Verizon Communications, has provided financial education and coaching to families and also spearheaded Head Start and Title I programs in schools.

          Her interests lie in consulting, leadership and a desire to empower people to change. The Multicultural Center and the Office of Multicultural Affairs is sponsoring the lecture.

          COT accepting applications for new student trustee

          Carver Hall

          Bloomsburg University's Council of Trustees is accepting applications for the position of student trustee now through Feb. 17. Students applying for the position should be a full time undergraduate student who is at least a second semester freshman and no more than a second semester junior. Candidates must be in good academic standing and be able to serve through May of 2018.

          As a student trustee, the selected student has a unique opportunity to represent his/her peers in all Council of Trustees meetings and Community Government Association, executive and senate, meetings. The student trustee aids the Council of Trustees, President, and Chancellor in making decisions regarding the University’s student life, academic programs, admissions, budgets, and university relations.

          Katherine Mullen, the outgoing student trustee, is a junior chemistry major. As the student trustee for the last two years has provided Mullen with many experiences, connections, networking opportunities, and privileges that has helped her grow, not only as a BU student but as a person as well. Student Trustees have opportunities to speak at graduation ceremonies, attend donor dinners and award ceremonies that add to their college experience.

          Mullen says about her fellow trustees, “I personally love listening to fellow trustees ask questions at meetings,” said Mullen. “All of them have years of professional experience that I, as a 21-year-old, cannot relate to. However, I am able to gain bits of wisdom by recognizing the experiences behind the questions they ask. Each time I interact with the trustees I walk away smiling. They are excited about the path I have chosen in life and are supportive of what I intend to do after I graduate.”

          Students interested in being a student trustee should contact Jennifer Williams in the President’s office at (570) 389-4523 or jwilliam@bloomu.edu. Applications are due by 4 p.m. on Friday, Feb.17.

          Gain a professional edge through the Husky Summit

          Husky Summit

          From participant to a presenter, senior Sarah Bartra has worked towards becoming a professional through the annual Husky Student Leadership Summit. Bartra, a dual communication studies and biological allied health major with a Spanish minor, is an active leader as vice president of Community Government Association (CGA).

          Bartra first attended the Husky Summit her sophomore year and this year she will be presenting a panel alongside her fellow CGA student leaders. Besides having the honor to present, she wants to use all the tools available from the Center for Leadership and Engagement (CLE) and the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience (CPDCE) to students at the summit.

          During her experience last year, Bartra had a more workable resume and utilized the networking and professional opportunities available at the summit. Being able to mock interview with alumni in her prospective field and receive their feedback was beneficial to Bartra. Networking with student leaders and BU alumni was also helpful. Last year’s keynote speaker Hoan Do, motivational speaker from American Ninja Warrior, was a memorable moment for Bartra.

          “His speech was energizing,” Bartra says. “It set the tone for the rest of the day.”

          The 11th annual Husky Student Leadership Summit is Saturday, Feb. 25, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., featuring BU alumni David Williams, president and CEO of the Make-A-Wish foundation, as the keynote speaker.

          11th annual Husky Student Leadership Summit

          This free day-long student leadership conference with alumni is sponsored by Alumni and Professional Engagement, CLE and CGA. This year’s theme is “Leaders United.” Keynote speaker — David Williams, president and CEO of the Make-A-Wish Foundation — is a 1981 accounting graduate and former member of the men’s tennis team.

          Throughout the conference, students are encouraged to attend various CLE leadership certification program workshops, roundtable discussions with alumni, the leadership networking luncheon and CPDCE, where they can get a professional headshot taken, engage in a mock interview, have resumes reviewed, discuss post grad opportunities and learn ways to brand themselves as a leader and a rising professional. To register, visit the Husky Summit portal on Husky Sync!

          A memorable learning experience for Douglass LLC

          Living and Learning Communities foster a unique learning environment for students with similar majors, interests and goals living together on campus and experiencing a variety of learning opportunities in and out of the classroom.

          One of the more active communities is the Frederick Douglass LLC, which regularly takes educational trips. This past fall, they traveled to Virginia to visit Belle Grove Plantation — an authentic late 18th-century plantation house and estate. For one student with a special connection to the LLC, the overnight trip left a lasting impression.

          “My uncle did research and found out we were related to Frederick Douglass,” said Marqueshay Tomlinson, a freshman nursing major, admitting she really wants to learn more about her ancestry.

          Tomlinson said this trip stuck out to her the most when she saw the list of LLC activities early in the semester given to her by her advisor, Brian Johnson, director of BU’s Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence. Tomlinson’s initial reaction was, “Wow… a slave plantation, oh my goodness!”

          Veteran journalist to speak about taboo questions

          Phillip Milano, founder of Y? The National Forum on People’s Differences, will present “Dare to Ask”, a lecture on how to love and respect others by learning everything about them on Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 7 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium in Carver Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

          Milano believes, curious students are better students, and encourages people to ask unflinching, politically incorrect questions about racial, cultural, and sexual differences. This helps individuals overcome fears of offending and gain greater understanding of one another. Milano, a 30-year journalist and 25-year newspaper veteran, has been featured on CBS, CNN, BET, BBC, and numerous newspapers such as, The Washington Post, New York Times, and USA Today. He is the author of the book, “I can’t Believe You Asked That!” and a writer for the newspaper column, “Dare to Ask.”

          The, “Dare to Ask” lecture is sponsored by the Fredrick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence.

          Job shadow brings career options into focus

          Catherine Garrity

          Catherine Garrity loves the creative edge marketing brings out in people and saw that firsthand through her recent job shadowing experience at Altitude Marking, an integrated B2B marketing agency in Emmaus.

          “I love working with others to combine interests and ideas,” explained Garrity, a junior business management major with a minor in marketing.

          Garrity was introduced to Altitude Marketing through her dad, owner of Compass Point, a consulting company for small businesses. Altitude Marketing was a past client of his, so she reached out to Andrew Stanten, president of the company.

          “He spoke very highly of his business and employees, and I could feel his passion for both,” Garrity said. “This was my first experience shadowing with an advertising agency, so it was something I was particularly excited about.”

          According to Garrity, the job shadow actually opened her eyes to an added career aspect to marketing. After speaking to Altitude’s public relations team, she began to envision a career path involving PR. She spent the day around several projects the team had worked on, including social media and writing.

          Through BU’s business program and the American University of Rome, a study abroad program, Garrity believes the courses she has completed have challenged and prepared her for the future in more than one way. She has developed strong writing and creativity skills, and has learned new limits.

          “This program has required me to step out of my comfort zone and do things I didn’t think I could do, such as creating marketing plans and advertising products for different companies,” said Garrity, adding through job shadowing her future career path is coming into focus.

          BOG scholars honored for fall achievement

          Board of Governors Scholars

          Bloomsburg University’s Board of Governors (BOG) Scholarship Program celebrated the opening of the spring semester with a welcome back dinner and informational meeting.

          During this time, the BOG students were also recognized for their academic achievements from the fall.

          • BOG students who received a 4.0 for the Fall 2016 semester — Olivia Best, Lauren Bunnell, Nadine De Jesus, Lizmeidy Hernandez, Cassidy Hess, Caleb Jackson, Carter Jackson, Elizabeth Kester, Kyle Mausteller, Oksana Picca, Michaela Raschi, Grace Schueren, Na’Shaun Scott, Megan Shay, Facia Sirleaf, Derek Stahl, and Emily Sweeney
          • BOG students who received a 3.5-4.0 GPA for the Fall 2016 semester — Jennifer Anani , Jasmine Bailey, Selene Bazan, Olivia Best, Augustina Bouduo, Lindsey Boutin, Lauren Bunnell, Damira Caldwell, Elayne Che, Jonathan Cruz, Kahlil Daniel, Nadine De Jesus, Veronica Dejesus, Emily Fazio, Alexander Fuchsman, Kaylynn Gerhart, Dashiyah Green, Damian Guzman, Tirah Hall, Takwan Hargrove, Lizmeidy Hernandez, Cassidy Hess, Riley Hotzman, Caleb Jackson, Carter Jackson, Louis Jenkins, Elizabeth Kester, Haley Kravitz, Kyle Mausteller, John McDonnell, Mary McGonigle, Ashley Mercado, Briannie Miranda, Shaidy Moronta, Kaitlin Muzzy, Amara Nazario, Jared Ortega, Teresa Ortiz, Gary Phillips, Oksana Picca, Taylor Raker, Michaela Raschi, Nathan Reynolds, Marisa Rhodes, Brandon Richardson, Bryan Rudolph, Adelina Sacouto, Grace Schueren, Nashaun Scott, Bryan Semon, Sebastian Shaffer, Megan Shay, Facia Sirleaf, Derek Stahl, Charlene Strange, Megan Sumner, Emily Sweeney, Johncarlos Tavares, Jaliyah Vanguine, Maritza Williams, and Kristin Woodlen
          • BOG students who received a 3.0-3.49 GPA for the Fall 2016 semester — Justine Adams , Ayesha Akther, Joan Ales-Miranda, Beverly Andre, Justin Angco, Erica Arbakov, Parajai Ash, Sarah Bartra, Marcus Bearfield, Derrick Bordner, Diona Brown, Naiya Brown, Cache Catlett, Alexia Claudio, Christiana Cragwell, Dajana Diaz-Colon, Shameriah Diggs-Washington, Gerald Douglas, Mark Drumm, Ashley Ferstermann, Jared Frank, Jose Gamboa, Edgar Garcia, Hadiyah Grove, Christopher Haas, Jahlil Hardy, Juliana Hernandez, Abdul- Qaadir Holloman, Jessica Jones, Kysir King, Crystal Kwashie, Amanda Leamon, Steven Lopez, Ydalini Madera, Amber Maxwell, Nicole McCaffrey, Taylor McCarthy, Liz Medina, Travis Miller, Valerie Mussey, Christopher Mychajluk, Kaleena Ortiz, Alexandria Ostman, Malcolm Pierce-Dandy, Todd Poe, Conrado Ramos, Brook Reichenbach, Shantel Robinson, Justice Rooker, Jonathan Shanley, Shelby Slaughter, Kyla Smith-Brown, Anandah Stephens, Max Strickler, Stephan Vajdic, Joseph Waack, Charlie Wallish, Tanisha Webster, Khadijah Williams, and Ke'yanna Wilson

          New scholarship search launched

          Scholarship Application Process

          Students will no longer need to scroll through a long list of scholarships and complete multiple paper applications that need to be turned into each department. Instead complete ONE application to automatically apply to multiple scholarships.

          Deadline for current students to complete the 2017-18 Scholarship Application online is March 1. Incoming freshman have until April 1.

          Students can find the application instructions on the scholarship website’s main page before logging in. Students can find the link to the scholarship website on their MyHusky account under the To Do List.

          Department committees will be provided with detailed instructions and training in the near future. Committee members will see a list of scholarships they are responsible for awarding upon logging on. Each scholarship will display a spreadsheet of eligible applicants including their answers from the scholarship application and data imported from MyHusky. Committee members will be able to sort and rank applicants and select recipients online.

          The financial aid office and BU Foundation, Inc., will view the selected recipients online, a list of recipients does not need to be emailed or put in campus mail anymore. The scholarship awards will be posted to student’s financial aid records and the students will receive an email notification of the award.

          Financial aid processing

          BU’s Bursar Office will begin processing financial aid on Thursday, Feb. 2. Students who have signed up for financial aid refund direct deposit via their student account will have their refunds deposited to their designated account within two business days of the email notification from the Bursar Office.

          For those students who have not signed up for direct deposit, financial aid refund checks will be mailed to the student’s registered home address. There is still time to enroll in the direct deposit option by logging into your MyHusky account.

          Students will be notified by email of their disbursement.

          A symbolic arrival for a final semester

          Rachel Cimera

          Rachel Ann Cimera is a senior Chinese major with a minor in political science who is spending her final semester as a undergraduate this spring studying abroad at the renowned Beijing Normal University, a public research university in China with strong emphasis on basic disciplines of humanities and sciences.

          "My arrival will be after one of the major holidays in China, the Chinese New Year also known as the Spring Festival. This happens during what is called the春运 Chunyun period, which occurs 15 days prior to the Lunar New Year. Fortunately for all of the Rooster born individuals, their year, 2017 has come."

          Discover. Explore. Experience!

          • Thinking about study abroad? — discover your path at the upcoming Study Abroad Open House on Thursday, Feb. 2, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., KUB Multipurpose B. Let us help you get started. Making the memories is up to you!
          • Celebrate the Chinese New Year — Sunday, Feb. 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom with food, dance and music. Sponsored by the Chinese Student Association, the Chinese Club, and the Office of Global and Multicultural Education.
          • Study in China this summer! — May 21 through June 11, explore Beijing, visit major cultural and historic sites including Forbidden City, Great Wall, Tiananmen Square, traditional and modern neighborhoods, gift stores and more. Taste authentic Chinese foods, learn Taichi, cooking and martial arts in cultural lectures. Learn Chinese and communicate with Chinese students and people on the streets! Earn 6 credits toward graduation in Chinese 101 and Chinese 211 Foundations of Chinese Civilization (carrying 3 GEPs). Both courses satisfy Chinese Minor requirement.

          Travel grant scholarship for student research

          BU's Global Awareness Society International is offering, on a competitive basis, $500 travel grant scholarships to students who wish to present their re-search at the 26th Annual Conference in Heredia, Costa Rica, from May 25 to 27, with optional educational programs May 28 and May 29. Requirements are:

          • Student must be a BU student or a May 2017 graduate.
          • Individual paper presentations are given top priority.
          • Paper can be in any discipline and should be related to the conference theme, Global Inequity and Human Rights
          • First time applicants are given preference.
          • Student must submit at abstract to the GASI office in 128 Andruss by Feb. 15
          • Awards are made at the Awards Dinner on May 27 at the conclusion of the conference. Contact James C. Pomfret, Andruss Library 128, at gasi@bloomu.edu.

            McDowell Institute hosts behavior analyst expert

            Rose Iovannone

            Bloomsburg University's McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support will hold its annual speaker series on Wednesday, Feb. 15 featuring Rose Iovannone. The talk will be at Monty’s beginning at 6 p.m. Admission is free and no pre-registration required.

            Iovannone is the principal investigator and director of the Florida Diagnostic Learning Resource Center Multi-disciplinary Clinic within the Florida Mental Health Institute, Division of Applied Research and Educational Support at the University of South Florida. Her current research and outreach endeavors emphasize design and implementation of sustainable individualized-intensive interventions and supports to address the needs of students with complex needs. She has authored an array of journal publications and books highlighting the comprehensive delivery of person-centered Positive Behavior Support and is a highly sought provider of training and systems design consultation by schools and human service agencies. She is a board certified behavior analyst and has served in numerous leadership capacities throughout her career for the Association for Behavior Analysis International as well as the International Association for Positive Behavior Support.

            The focus of this year’s event will be on designing effective systems of intensive Positive Behavior Support for individual students with complex needs. Increasingly schools are installing both universal and targeted forms of Positive Behavior Support to address non-academic barriers to learning. This session should prove highly valuable to future teachers, social workers and professionals from other child-serving systems.

            FOCUS celebrates Black History Month with campus visit

            Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia, for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Feb. 19, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and blessings in honor of Black History Month.

            Through culturally relevant activities and events, and biblical discipleship F.O.C.U.S. promotes Godly unity amongst young adults. In addition to activities and events such as F.O.C.U.S Friday (monthly Bible Study) and “Keeping it 100” (a group meeting and safe space for young adult men). F.O.C.U.S is also actively involved in community service and outreach initiatives.

            Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods, coordinator of minority affairs, at 570-389-4091 for details.

            Greater awareness, better understanding

            World Hijab Day

            Because current political debates and national policies often conflate and over-simplify complex issues regarding Islam, the suffering of refugees, and matters of national security and public safety, Bloomsburg University students and faculty have organized a series of events this week, which hope will help the university community become better informed.

            • Wednesday, Feb. 1 (Sutliff Hall, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. — BU's Muslim Student Association is celebrating World Hijab Day, which honors women’s right to cover. MSA is an organization open to all and invites everyone who is curious about hijab and who wish their support for the Muslim women to this event.
            • Thursday, Feb. 2 (Hartline's Kuster Auditorium, 5:30 to 7:30 PM); students and faculty will join in screening the PBS frontline documentary on Yemen, Yemen Under Siege. The journal Foreign Policy called this documentary “a revelation, both for its remarkable footage of the Houthi movement and for its clear-eyed perspective on Yemen’s politics and future.” Yemen is one of the seven countries included in the recent freeze on America’s refugee program.
            • Friday, Feb. 3 , (Quad 4 p.m.) — Bloomsburg University Indivisible: #NoBan. Students, faculty, staff and community members will hold a conversation, protest and vigil in response to the recent executive order banning immigrants from seven different countries. The event begins on the Academic Quad then moves to steps of Carver Hall, where participants will be given candles.

            Emergency notification system testing

            Emergency Notification System

            All components of BU’s emergency notification system – sirens, email, voice, and text messages – will be tested on Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 9:45 a.m.

            All BU students and registered faculty and staff will receive a test email, voice, and text message if they opted to receive notification in these formats. For instructions on how to sign up or opt out of the text message component, see bloomu.edu/bualert where information can be updated at any time.

            The sirens, installed on Elwell Hall, McCormick Center for Human Services and Nelson Field House, will alert the campus community when vital emergency information is available via email, voice, and text message. Anyone who is on campus Wednesday at 9:45 a.m. but does not hear the sirens is asked to notify Belinda DeLeon, safety administrator, at bdeleon@bloomu.edu. BU tests the emergency notification system once each semester.

            CAS presents independent documentary

            Hilleman Documentary

            "Mostly Mondays at the Movies," part of Bloomsburg University’s Celebrity Artist Series, continues with the showing of "Hilleman – A Perilous Quest to Save the World’s Children.” The film will be screened on Monday, Feb. 6, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

            The documentary tells the journey of Dr. Maurice R. Hilleman, a man with a simple goal: eliminate all diseases that infect and kill children. From his youth in poverty in Montana, Hilleman would go on to prevent pandemic flu, develop the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and invent the first vaccine against human cancer. With interviews from Hilleman and his peers, this documentary puts a human face behind vaccine science that has impacted nearly every human on the planet.

            Director Donald Rayne Mitchell will lead a discussion following the screening. Tickets are $3.50 in advance and $4 at the door.

            Former NAACP leader to speak on MLK Jr.’s legacy

            Benjamin Jealous

            Former president and CEO of the NAACP Benjamin Jealous will be the keynote speaker at Bloomsburg University’s 24th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Celebration. Jealous will present, “Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s Legacy” on Tuesday, Feb. 7, at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

            Jealous is a civil and human rights leader, venture capitalist and author. For five years, he was the president and CEO of the NAACP until stepping down in 2013. He is currently a partner at Kapor Capital, a Silicon Valley venture capital firm where he invests in high-growth companies with positive social impact. Jealous also teaches graduate courses at Princeton University on civil rights, social entrepreneurship and leadership as well as being a regular commentator on MSNBC.

            He is also the author of the book “Reach: 40 Black Men Speak on Living, Leading and Succeeding.” Jealous also serves as an advisor for multiple tech startups that work to close gaps, particularly in the areas of financial inclusion, justice tech, and low wage work. He serves as a board member at Pigeonly and a board advisor at PayNearMe. Jealous holds a B.A. in political science from Columbia University and a master's degree in comparative social research from the University of Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

            The Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Celebration is sponsored by the Multicultural Center and the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

            University book read for Women's History Month

            University Read

            To celebrate Women’s History Month, the Zeigler College of Business and Women’s Resource Center will sponsor a keynote speech on March 23 by Joann Lublin, a journalist with the Wall Street Journal. Joann’s recent book titled Earning It: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World chronicles the careers of 50 successful women executives.

            Three of our outstanding faculty — Laura Davis (business law), Megumi Omori (sociology), and Victoria Geyfman (finance) — will hold a “university read” for interested faculty, staff, and students. Participants will meet several times before March 23 to share what they have learned about the author, book, and key issues about women at work.

            Those who participate in the “university read” will be invited to a personal lunch with Joann Lublin and her husband before the keynote speech. Joann will personally sign books at the luncheon and after her talk.

            The Zeigler College of Business will purchase books for the first 100 people who participate in the “university read.” If you wish to participate, please contact Davis, Omori, or Geyfman by the end of Monday, Feb. 6. They will distribute the books on Tuesday, Feb. 14, and have a lunch with the author before the keynote speech on March 23. Joann Lublin will personally sign books at the luncheon and after her talk.

            Book Summary: More than 50 trailblazing executive women who broke the corporate glass ceiling offer inspiring and surprising insights and lessons in this essential, in-the-trenches career guide from Joann S. Lublin, a Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and management news editor for The Wall Street Journal.

            Are you career ready?

            In today's competitive job market, employers are looking for more than just good grades. They want a clean, concise resume, an applicant who shows up prepared and confident, someone who articulates why they are a good candidate for the organization and an employee who performs in a professional manner.

            Seniors and juniors can learn how to leverage skills and experiences to be successful in the transition from student to professional by attending a Career Intensive Boot Camp on Feb. 10 to 12 or March 3 to 5. Attendees will participate in 20-plus unique sessions, including: Compensation Considerations, Debunking the "Career Path" Myth, The Shocking Truth of Getting Hired, Making Connections on LinkedIn, 3 Mock Interviews, Office Communications, a Professional Etiquette Dinner and more.

            Craig R. Shuey, chief operating officer for the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission and BU alumnus, will be the keynote speaker at the Career Intensive Boot Camp. There is also the opportunity to network with more than 60 alumni, organization representatives, faculty and staff. Sessions are held at the Greenly Center in downtown Bloomsburg. Shuttle from campus is available. Space is limited.

            Putting the you in Professional U

            • Career Intensive Boot Camp — Feb. 10 to 12. A weekend experience for seniors, juniors and recent graduates to learn how to leverage your skills and experiences to get a job. A second boot camp will be held March 3 to 5.
            • CPDCE Open House — Feb. 15, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. "Let what you love be what you do." A great quote but how do you get there?
            • Career Connections Expo — April 7, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. All majors seeking job opportunities for all industries in one location at Nelson Field House, along with internship and job shadowing opportunities.

            "Early America" exhibit in Haas Gallery

            Early America

            Sculptor Lewis Colburn will launch the Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania spring art exhibition series with his work titled “Early America” at the Haas Gallery of Art from Wednesday, Feb. 8, through Thursday, March 9. There will be an opening reception on Feb. 8 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The show is free and open to the public.

            Colburn’s “Early America” show focuses on how objects can be used to re-tell and re-interpret the past through current experience. Colburn is interested in how we choose and neglect narratives through historical replications and how the act of re-telling the past can manifest itself as the object.

            Colburn earned bachelor’s degrees in studio art and Russian language at St. Olaf College and received a Master of Fine Arts in sculpture from Syracuse University. His work has exhibited across the United States in places like Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and throughout upstate New York. Colburn is a member of NAPOLEON, an artist-run project space in Philadelphia’s Rollins Building.

            Sankofa Conference

            Sankofa

            Bloomsburg University's annual Sankofa Conference will feature Jamal Johnson and Muhibb Dyer, community activist, poet and co-founder of Flood the Hood Dreams, on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom.

            Established the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Sankofa Conference grew out of the need for students to learn, understand, and appreciate the rich cultural heritage of people of African descent. The conference has developed as a way to promote unity and understanding among students and to provide a forum for discussion and learning.

            Johnson will serve as the keynote speaker. Dyer, who has performed throughout the United States and was a finalist in 2002 at the National Poetry Slam, will lead a workshop with students on “Survivor Guilt.”

            The conference is free for students but registration required by Friday, Feb. 10, at the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

            Combating fear and intimidation

            Lisa Bryant

            Lisa Bryant, a management consultant with 25-plus years of professional experience in training and education, will present “Get the ‘F’ (Fear) Out of Here” on Feb. 13, at 6 p.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center.

            Her interactive presentation will use various techniques to explore the effects of fear and intimidation on leadership. According to Bryant, the audience will examine and question the differences between fear and intimidation and acquire strategies to combat them.

            Bryant is the president and CEO of LBAFG Consulting, which develops and facilitates strategic plans as well as consults for Greek Letter Organizations, colleges and universities. She has long expressed her love for training and education through motivating special education and Title I workshops for various school districts and head start programs, as well as provided financial education and coaching to countless families.

            Bryant is an ordained pastor and an independent recording artist who has ministered across the country, resulting in a large amount of public speaking experience.

            New scholarship search launched

            Scholarship Application Process

            Students will no longer need to scroll through a long list of scholarships and complete multiple paper applications that need to be turned into each department. Instead complete ONE application to automatically apply to multiple scholarships.

            Deadline for current students to complete the 2017-18 Scholarship Application online is March 1. Incoming freshman have until April 1.

            Students can find the application instructions on the scholarship website’s main page before logging in. Students can find the link to the scholarship website on their MyHusky account under the To Do List.

            Department committees will be provided with detailed instructions and training in the near future. Committee members will see a list of scholarships they are responsible for awarding upon logging on. Each scholarship will display a spreadsheet of eligible applicants including their answers from the scholarship application and data imported from MyHusky. Committee members will be able to sort and rank applicants and select recipients online.

            The financial aid office and BU Foundation, Inc., will view the selected recipients online, a list of recipients does not need to be emailed or put in campus mail anymore. The scholarship awards will be posted to student’s financial aid records and the students will receive an email notification of the award.

            Financial aid processing

            BU’s Bursar Office will begin processing financial aid on Thursday, Feb. 2. Students who have signed up for financial aid refund direct deposit via their student account will have their refunds deposited to their designated account within two business days of the email notification from the Bursar Office.

            For those students who have not signed up for direct deposit, financial aid refund checks will be mailed to the student’s registered home address. There is still time to enroll in the direct deposit option by logging into your MyHusky account.

            Students will be notified by email of their disbursement.

            A symbolic arrival for a final semester

            Rachel Cimera

            Rachel Ann Cimera is a senior Chinese major with a minor in political science who is spending her final semester as a undergraduate this spring studying abroad at the renowned Beijing Normal University, a public research university in China with strong emphasis on basic disciplines of humanities and sciences.

            "My arrival will be after one of the major holidays in China, the Chinese New Year also known as the Spring Festival. This happens during what is called the春运 Chunyun period, which occurs 15 days prior to the Lunar New Year. Fortunately for all of the Rooster born individuals, their year, 2017 has come."

            Discover. Explore. Experience!

            • Thinking about study abroad? — discover your path at the upcoming Study Abroad Open House on Thursday, Feb. 2, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., KUB Multipurpose B. Let us help you get started. Making the memories is up to you!
            • Celebrate the Chinese New Year — Sunday, Feb. 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom with food, dance and music. Sponsored by the Chinese Student Association, the Chinese Club, and the Office of Global and Multicultural Education.
            • Study in China this summer! — May 21 through June 11, explore Beijing, visit major cultural and historic sites including Forbidden City, Great Wall, Tiananmen Square, traditional and modern neighborhoods, gift stores and more. Taste authentic Chinese foods, learn Taichi, cooking and martial arts in cultural lectures. Learn Chinese and communicate with Chinese students and people on the streets! Earn 6 credits toward graduation in Chinese 101 and Chinese 211 Foundations of Chinese Civilization (carrying 3 GEPs). Both courses satisfy Chinese Minor requirement.

            Travel grant scholarship for student research

            BU's Global Awareness Society International is offering, on a competitive basis, $500 travel grant scholarships to students who wish to present their re-search at the 26th Annual Conference in Heredia, Costa Rica, from May 25 to 27, with optional educational programs May 28 and May 29. Requirements are:

            • Student must be a BU student or a May 2017 graduate.
            • Individual paper presentations are given top priority.
            • Paper can be in any discipline and should be related to the conference theme, Global Inequity and Human Rights
            • First time applicants are given preference.
            • Student must submit at abstract to the GASI office in 128 Andruss by Feb. 15
            • Awards are made at the Awards Dinner on May 27 at the conclusion of the conference. Contact James C. Pomfret, Andruss Library 128, at gasi@bloomu.edu.

              Every day, a new adventure in Spain

              Spain Study Abroad

              One day exploring the historic sights of the city like the Arabic Baths and the La Capilla Real (The Royal Chapel). Tasting the local Mediterranean cuisine at the cafes and restaurants for lunch. Another day experiencing the traditions during the holiday season like Three Kings Day. This winter break has been a new adventure every day for Racquel Kreischer as she is studying abroad in Granada, Spain.

              Kreischer, a senior engineering major, is spending her winter break studying Spanish through the Instituto Mediterráneo Sol Granada. While living with her host family, Kreischer is learning the language up close as she is directly immersed in Spanish culture.
              “It was a shock being immersed into Spanish with my host family and classes speaking only Spanish, but in the span of a week I have caught on quickly! Everything is in Spanish, tours, conversations with my host family, eating at restaurants, so it is very important to learn quickly.”

              Becoming fully engaged in the language has allowed Kreischer to discover and experience all the warm city of Granada has to offer. “There is so much to do in the beautiful city of Granada and living with a family makes studying here even more exciting. I know where all the best places to go and things to do here are located.”

              Study Abroad Open House: — Thursday, Feb. 2, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., KUB Multipurpose B. Let us help you get started. Making the memories is up to you!

              Broadening global horizons in Poland

              Poland Study Abroad

              For the fifth year, another group Bloomsburg University students ventured to Poland during winter break to study at Jagiellonian University in Poland. Alexandra Miller, senior honors student majoring in ASL and Spanish, was among 40 students and three faculty members, including Michael Martin, assistant professor of English, to study in Kraków.

              While studying at the Polish Institute of Language and Culture, students and faculty gather at the university to take two courses for credit. With a course about the history of Jews in Europe and another on Eastern European Film, Literature and Culture, Miller and her fellow abroad students gain a unique in-depth insight on Eastern European culture and history.

              To balance their intensive study, students immersed themselves in Kraków’s rich culture and walked through the history of Poland with trips to places like the Wieliczka Salt Mine and Auschwitz. Journeying to several cities in Eastern and Central Europe, this trip is a cultural experience unlike any other as Miller, Martin and others are pushed to think differently both academically and internationally.

              “Sharing dinner with students who appreciate another language, having breakfast with our Russian Fulbright Scholar (did you know we had one at Bloomsburg right now?) or listening to students who are studying Russian are great reminders that the world is much larger than the drive from your home to school and back, or from home to a major city.”

              Study Abroad Open House: — Thursday, Feb. 2, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., KUB Multipurpose B. Let us help you get started. Making the memories is up to you!

              Living the "pure life" in Costa Rica

              Costa Rica Study Abroad

              Pura Vida, or pure life, means to love life. These wise words are at the heart of Costa Rican culture. Kylie Goodling is living this philosophy she learned from her host mother as she spends her winter break studying abroad in Heredia, Costa Rica.

              Goodling, a senior speech language pathology major and Spanish and linguistics minor as well as an ESL certification student, is completing her Spanish minor through SOL. Living with her host mom Cecilia (or Mama Tica), she is taking courses on Latin American culture and civilization.

              Besides studying, Goodling is fully immersed in the sights and sounds of Latin American culture in scenic Heredia. Visiting the Basilica, trying local food and even white water rafting have been a part of Goodling’s study abroad experience. Goodling’s Costa Rican journey has been pura vida.

              “Mama Tica is seriously one of the best people I have ever met. She is so full of heart and soul. She is always telling us to love ourselves no matter what anyone else thinks.”

              Study Abroad Open House: — Thursday, Feb. 2, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., KUB Multipurpose B. Let us help you get started. Making the memories is up to you!

              Interested in being a Student Trustee?

              Council of Trustees

              Applications for the position of student member of the Council of Trustees, representing the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, at Bloomsburg University are now being accepted.

              A candidate shall be at least a second semester freshman, but no more than a second semester junior, who is a full-time undergraduate student in attendance at the university, and is in good academic standing.

              Must be willing to serve through May 2018. Application deadline is 4 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 17. For more details, contact Jennifer Williams in the President’s office 570-389-4523 or jwilliam@bloomu.edu.

              BU to participate in SARA initiative

              National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (SARA)

              The National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) has recognized Bloomsburg University as an institutional participant in the SARA initiative.

              The State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA) is a voluntary agreement among its member states and U.S. territories that establishes comparable national standards for interstate offering of postsecondary distance-education courses and programs. It is intended to make it easier for students to take online courses offered by postsecondary institutions based in another state. It also allows students to participate in many types of field experiences in other SARA-member states. Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia participate in SARA. (SARA does not address professional licensing board approval for courses or programs leading to state licensing or certification.)

              SARA increases administrative efficiency and lowers the costs of obtaining authorization to provide postsecondary distance education in states that join. The benefits result in improved access as institutions can make their academic programs more widely available and accept enrollments from students in other states.

              ll SARA institutions annually commit to several steps designed to ensure that courses and programs offered through the SARA initiative provide high-quality learning opportunities that can help students reach their goals.

              SARA is administered by the four regional education compacts (Midwestern Higher Education Compact, New England Board of Higher Education, Southern Regional Education Board, and the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education). Membership is open to degree-granting postsecondary institutions from all sectors (public colleges and universities; independent institutions, both non-profit and for-profit) accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education.

              Year in Review

              Year in Review

              Another productive and memorable year at Bloomsburg University has come to a close. Yet, 2016 wasn’t so routine. A collection of academic programs achieved national prominence along with several student groups reaching unprecedented success in fundraising and competition.

              Meanwhile, the tradition of students discovering new levels of advancement, impact and scholarship continued as well.

              Top 5 Most Read Stories

              • BU ranks among the U.S. News best — BU once again made the list of top universities in the northern region of the country, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual rankings.
              • 9/11 tragedy inspires research path — Although just 6 years old at the time, Sept. 11, 2001 is a day Elizabeth Miller can never forget.
              • Liberal Arts Symposium — Unofficially kicking off Homecoming Weekend, more than 25 alumni returned to campus to help facilitate the two-day annual symposium.
              • Prateek Goorha award winner ready for politics — With dreams of becoming Secretary of State one day, Kimberly Martin is eyeing a long career in government and politics.
              • Study abroad sets table for research — Lydia Stebbins’s research has already taken her through the quaint food markets of culturally rich Xalapa, Mexico, and will soon go global again into another cultural hub, Morocco.

              Demolition derby exhibit featured

              Last Car Running

              Photographer Christine Pearl will feature her photo essay collection, “Last Car Running” at Bloomsburg University’s Haas Gallery of Art. Her show opens Thursday, Dec. 22, in the Haas Gallery of Art. This show is free and open to the public.

              “Last Car Running” focuses on demolition derby culture and its participants. Pearl’s interest in this subject stems from her attraction to people and parallels her reasons for taking photographs as a disabled artist. Her photography of rural demolition derby culture captures “contemporary redneck culture” and how the dwindling blue-collar class finds freedom in the automobile.

              Pearl is a photographer with a private practice based in Washington, D.C. With a background in design and construction, Pearl began to shoot photographs in 2010 as a way to cope with disability. Photography become her physical therapy to deal with limited mobility. Since then, she has a long exhibition record from the District of Columbia, Texas, New York and internationally in Hungary. She also has an extensive publication history in a variety of media formats with her latest photo essay featured in Photo Technique Magazine and Rear Curtain. 

              A closing reception will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 1 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with an artist lecture at 1:15 p.m. The Haas Gallery of Art is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

              Graduate students to present at international convention

              ACPA Convention

              Presenting a unique session at an international convention is a considerable accomplishment, especially for graduate students. (Mary) Kate Orzolek M.Ed. ‘17 and Katie Slater M.Ed. ’17 in Bloomsburg University's College Student Affairs program, will each present program sessions this spring at the 2017 convention of ACPA: College Student Educators-International in Columbus, Ohio.

              Orzolek will present “Preparing for the Alpha Generation Entering College: Foreshadowing and Dialectic.” Slater’s presentation is entitled “Drunkorexia and Disordered Eating in College Students.” Both students have been mentored in their proposal development process by Mindy Andino, Ed.D, assistant professor, of educational leadership and college student affairs, who is also co-presenting each session.

              ICS symposium to explore diversity this spring

               Imam Daayiee Abdullah

              This upcoming semester, the Institute for Culture and Society will organize its annual Bloomsburg Explores symposium on “Diversity.” Given that diversity includes many categories, that are beyond ICS's ability to cover in one semester, its focus will be on four topics: gender, race, language and culture, and religion. To explore all four topics, a series of events are scheduled including a guest-speaker lecture, panels and discussions, two book clubs and more.

              The participants in the panel discussions are BU students and for each panel ICS will have faculty moderating the discussion. Students will receive a list of questions beforehand to help them prepare for the panels and to stay focused on the topic. ICS's goal is to celebrate diversity and to highlight the issues that make diversity challenging. It is only by creating a healthy environment for everyone that ICS could promote understanding and respect for all regardless of our differences.

              Faculty promotion and and tenure

              Faculty Tenure Promotions

              The following faculty members have been granted tenure effective Spring 2017:

              • Johan van de Jagt, exceptionality programs
                • The following faculty members were granted promotion effective Fall 2016:

                  • Faculty promoted to professor — Kevin Ball, psychology; Nathalie Cornelius, languages and cultures; John Hintz, environmental, geographical, and geological sciences; Claire Lawrence, English; Eric Stouffer, psychology; Mark Tapsak, chemistry and biochemistry
                  • Faculty promoted to associate professor — Michael Borland, chemistry and biochemistry; William Coleman, biological and allied health sciences; Monica Favia, management and marketing; Jason Genovese, mass communications; Joseph Hazzard, exercise science; Kathleen Heitzman, athletics; Mary King, communication studies; Michael McFarland, athletics; Matthew Slotkin, music, theatre and dance
                  • Faculty promoted to assistant professor — Tara Diehl, academic enrichment

                  The following faculty members were granted tenure effective Fall 2016:

                  • Michael Borland, chemistry and biochemistry
                  • Kimberly Cardimona, audiology and speech pathology
                  • William Coleman, biological and allied health sciences
                  • Michael McFarland, athletics
                  • Matthew Slotkin, music, theatre and dance

                  Regional STEM center receives PPL grant

                  STEM Grant

                  Bloomsburg University's Regional STEM Education Center received a $25,000 grant from the PPL Foundation. The funds will support the GI-STEM: Girls in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Day for regional Girl Scouts on Saturday, March 4, 2017, and the Great STEM Adventure Camps June 5–9, 2017, at Bloomsburg University.
                  STEM Grant.

                  GI-STEM Day encourages Girl Scouts in Brownies (second and third grades), Juniors (fourth and fifth grades), and Cadettes (sixth-eighth grades) to get excited about the STEM field. The day, designed to teach girls how to enjoy both learning about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and be very successful in school in STEM subjects. During the program, Girl Scouts move through hands-on STEM stations facilitated by Bloomsburg University education and nursing majors to learn about STEM principles. Also, the Girl Scouts will hear from female STEM speakers and have presentations from Mad Science of Lehigh Valley and Chesapeake Bay Field Research Station.

                  Why study abroad?

                  Study abroad offers students formidable career-enhancing experiences and new perspectives vital to personal growth. Rapid globalization in economics, arts and culture, science, and education means that students with significant immersion abroad will get better jobs and have richer lives—which is a statistical fact. When students study abroad, they also contribute in the end to greater intercultural relations and improved ecological sustainability, because as a group they have a refined grasp of how humans relate to each other and to the natural environment.

                  Husky Abroad ... over winter session

                  • Costa Rica — Follow Kylie Goodling as she studies abroad at Latin University in Heredia.
                  • Spain — Follow Racquel Kreischer as she studies at Instituto Mediterráneo Sol Granada in Granada.
                  • Poland — Follow Alexandra Miller as she studies abroad at Jagiellonian University in Kraków.

                  Husky Abroad ... this summer?

                  • China — Explore Beijing from May 21 through June 11, visit major cultural and historic sites including Forbidden City, Great Wall,
                    Tiananmen Square, the National Museum, traditional and modern neighborhoods, gift stores and more. Taste authentic Chinese foods, learn Taichi, cooking and martial arts in cultural lectures. Learn Chinese and communicate with Chinese students and people on the streets!
                  • Norway — Explore Norway’s physical and cultural landscapes from May 23 through June 12, hike along the Arctic Circle, visit a glacier, up close and personal. Discover Norway’s stunning geology. Consider Norway’s transformation from one of Europe’s poorest to one of its richest countries. Travel the country by train, foot, ferry, and car. Experience the majesty of Norway’s fjords, by ferry. Explore Norway’s three largest cities, and see artifacts of the Viking world, including a 1000-year-old ship.

                  New one-stop scholarship search launched

                  Scholarship Application Process

                  Students will no longer need to scroll through a long list of scholarships and complete multiple paper applications that need to be turned into each department. Instead complete ONE application to automatically apply to multiple scholarships.

                  Deadline for current students to complete the 2017-18 Scholarship Application online is March 1. Incoming freshman have until April 1.

                  Students can find the application instructions on the scholarship website’s main page before logging in. Students can find the link to the scholarship website on their MyHusky account under the To Do List.

                  Department committees will be provided with detailed instructions and training in the near future. Committee members will see a list of scholarships they are responsible for awarding upon logging on. Each scholarship will display a spreadsheet of eligible applicants including their answers from the scholarship application and data imported from MyHusky. Committee members will be able to sort and rank applicants and select recipients online.

                  The financial aid office and BU Foundation, Inc., will view the selected recipients online, a list of recipients does not need to be emailed or put in campus mail anymore. The scholarship awards will be posted to student’s financial aid records and the students will receive an email notification of the award.

                  Year in Review

                  Year in Review

                  Another productive and memorable year at Bloomsburg University has come to a close. Yet, 2016 wasn’t so routine. A collection of academic programs achieved national prominence along with several student groups reaching unprecedented success in fundraising and competition.

                  Meanwhile, the tradition of students discovering new levels of advancement, impact and scholarship continued as well.

                  Top 5 Most Read Stories

                  • BU ranks among the U.S. News best — BU once again made the list of top universities in the northern region of the country, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual rankings.
                  • 9/11 tragedy inspires research path — Although just 6 years old at the time, Sept. 11, 2001 is a day Elizabeth Miller can never forget.
                  • Liberal Arts Symposium — Unofficially kicking off Homecoming Weekend, more than 25 alumni returned to campus to help facilitate the two-day annual symposium.
                  • Prateek Goorha award winner ready for politics — With dreams of becoming Secretary of State one day, Kimberly Martin is eyeing a long career in government and politics.
                  • Study abroad sets table for research — Lydia Stebbins’s research has already taken her through the quaint food markets of culturally rich Xalapa, Mexico, and will soon go global again into another cultural hub, Morocco.

                  Political science graduate earns TWC award

                  David Broadwell

                  David Broadwell, who graduated in December with a bachelor’s degree in political science, was recently chosen to receive The Washington Center’s Award for Community Life.

                  This award is given each term to a deserving student who fosters community by promoting global citizenship and mentorship among the diverse TWC population independently or through Community Life programming. Broadwell, also a student veteran, was recognized during the center’s fall commencement ceremony.

                  TWC is an independent, nonprofit organization serving hundreds of colleges and universities by providing selected students challenging opportunities to work and learn in Washington, D.C. for academic credit. The largest program of its kind, TWC has 70 full-time staff and more than 50,000 alumni, many of whom are in leadership positions in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors.

                  Graduate students to present at international convention

                  ACPA Convention

                  Presenting a unique session at an international convention is a considerable accomplishment, especially for graduate students. (Mary) Kate Orzolek M.Ed. ‘17 and Katie Slater M.Ed. ’17 in Bloomsburg University's College Student Affairs program, will each present program sessions this spring at the 2017 convention of ACPA: College Student Educators-International in Columbus, Ohio.

                  Orzolek will present “Preparing for the Alpha Generation Entering College: Foreshadowing and Dialectic.” Slater’s presentation is entitled “Drunkorexia and Disordered Eating in College Students.” Both students have been mentored in their proposal development process by Mindy Andino, Ed.D, assistant professor, of educational leadership and college student affairs, who is also co-presenting each session.

                  • “Preparing for the Alpha Generation Entering College: Foreshadowing and Dialectic” by Kate Orzolek — Student Affairs practitioners have a responsibility to begin discussing how higher education will transform as students begin to enroll who have never known a world without social media. Each new generation of college students has witnessed advancements regarding technology. However, the Alpha Generation may have experienced the largest evolutionary shift throughout history. During this session, the presenter will explore the enrollment of the Alpha Generation in an effort to implement a strengths-based education initiative. Such discussion will be used to inquire about the potential academic performance and social engagement of this new generation.
                  • "Drunkorexia and Disordered Eating in College Students" by Katie Slater — The phenomenon of Drunkorexia, typically categorized by cutting out food to “save” calories for or compensate for alcohol calories, excessive exercising to compensate for calories consumed while drinking, or purposefully drinking to excess in order to vomit and purge previously eaten food (Barry & Piazza-Gardner, 2012) is becoming more prevalent on college campuses across the country. This research explores the lived experiences of students. This research study endeavors to gain a nuanced understanding of the implication of drunkorexia behavior through qualitative methods in order to inform the creation of preventative educational programs and intervention strategies.

                  ICS symposium to explore diversity this spring

                   Imam Daayiee Abdullah

                  This upcoming semester, the Institute for Culture and Society will organize its annual Bloomsburg Explores symposium on “Diversity.” Given that diversity includes many categories, that are beyond ICS's ability to cover in one semester, its focus will be on four topics: gender, race, language and culture, and religion. To explore all four topics, a series of events are scheduled including a guest-speaker lecture, panels and discussions, two book clubs and more.

                  The participants in the panel discussions are BU students and for each panel ICS will have faculty moderating the discussion. Students will receive a list of questions beforehand to help them prepare for the panels and to stay focused on the topic. ICS's goal is to celebrate diversity on and off campus and to highlight the issues that make diversity challenging. It is only by creating a healthy environment for everyone that ICS could promote understanding and respect for all regardless of our differences.

                  ICS Events

                  • Wednesday, Feb. 22, 6:30 p.m., Centennial 218 — Guest Speaker: Imam Daayiee Abdullah
                  • Tuesday, Feb. 28, 7 p.m., Centennial 201 — Panel 1: Gender and Sexual Identity
                  • Tuesday, March 7, 7 p.m., Centennial 201 — Panel 2: Race, Racism and Ethnicity
                  • Tuesday, March 28, 7 p.m., Centennial 201 — Panel 3: Study Abroad and Cultural Exchange
                  • Tuesday, April 4, 7 p.m., Centennial 201 — Panel 4: Religion, Pluralism and Misconceptions
                  • Tuesday April 11, TBA, Multicultural Center 230 ̵2 Open Discussion: Language and Diversity

                  For more information on upcoming ICS events contact Yahya Laayouni at ylaayoun@bloomu.edu.

                  Book Club 1: Sessions

                  "Between the World and Me" by Ta-Nehisi Coates

                  • Jan. 30 and Feb. 6, Session 1a/2a, noon, TALE Center, Andruss Library
                  • Jan. 31 and Feb. 7, Session 1b/2b, 11 a.m., TALE Center, Andruss Library
                  • Jan. 31 and Feb. 7, Session 1c/2c, 1:30 p.m. 11 a.m., TALE Center, Andruss Library

                  Book Club 2 (after Spring Break)

                  "Faith Club" by Ranya Idliby, Suzanne Oliver, Priscilla Warner. For more information on book clubs contact Christina Francis at cfrancis@bloomu.edu.

                  Demolition derby exhibit featured

                  Last Car Running

                  Photographer Christine Pearl will feature her photo essay collection, “Last Car Running” at Bloomsburg University’s Haas Gallery of Art. Her show opens Thursday, Dec. 22, in the Haas Gallery of Art. This show is free and open to the public.

                  “Last Car Running” focuses on demolition derby culture and its participants. Pearl’s interest in this subject stems from her attraction to people and parallels her reasons for taking photographs as a disabled artist. Her photography of rural demolition derby culture captures “contemporary redneck culture” and how the dwindling blue-collar class finds freedom in the automobile.

                  Pearl is a photographer with a private practice based in Washington, D.C. With a background in design and construction, Pearl began to shoot photographs in 2010 as a way to cope with disability. Photography become her physical therapy to deal with limited mobility. Since then, she has a long exhibition record from the District of Columbia, Texas, New York and internationally in Hungary. She also has an extensive publication history in a variety of media formats with her latest photo essay featured in Photo Technique Magazine and Rear Curtain. 

                  A closing reception will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 1 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with an artist lecture at 1:15 p.m. The Haas Gallery of Art is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.