Today's News of 2016

Today's News


Year in Review

Year in Review

Another productive and memorable year at Bloomsburg University has come to a close.

Yet, 2016 wasn’t so routine. A collection of academic programs achieved national prominence along with several student groups reaching unprecedented success in fundraising and competition.

Meanwhile, the tradition of students discovering new levels of advancement, impact and scholarship continued as well.

Top 16 Most Read Stories

  • BU ranks among the U.S. News best — BU once again made the list of top universities in the northern region of the country, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual rankings.
  • 9/11 tragedy inspires research path — Although just 6 years old at the time, Sept. 11, 2001 is a day Elizabeth Miller can never forget.
  • Liberal Arts Symposium — Unofficially kicking off Homecoming Weekend, more than 25 alumni returned to campus to help facilitate the two-day annual symposium.
  • Prateek Goorha award winner ready for politics — With dreams of becoming Secretary of State one day, Kimberly Martin is eyeing a long career in government and politics.
  • Study abroad sets table for research — Lydia Stebbins’s research has already taken her through the quaint food markets of culturally rich Xalapa, Mexico, and will soon go global again into another cultural hub, Morocco.
  • Once again ‘military friendly’ — For the third time, BU has earned the title of Military Friendly School from Victory Media, publisher of GI Jobs magazine — the first as a Silver Level Award.
  • A new name for the College of Business — The combination of an outright $5 million gift, endowed to provide immediate support, and a deferred gift from Zeigler Family Foundation, to strengthen COB, is one of the largest gifts from an individual donor in the history of PASSHE.
  • Geology class studies Lake Michigan — During their two-week field experience students learned field study techniques and how to analyze field observations that culminated in student-directed field presentations.
  • Record turnout raises $52k for relay — Through the support of 1,138 volunteers making up 62 teams, BU’s Relay for Life event raised more than $52,191 this spring for the American Cancer Society.
  • Cyber defense team advances in NCCDC — Putting its network, security and hacking skills to test, the Bloomsburg Cyber Defense Club recently reached unprecedented success in the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition against 33 other universities in the Mid-Atlantic Regional qualifier.
  • NSSLHA helps provide “Hope for Harper” — NSSLHA wanted to kick off the new semester with a substantial donation to a local family in need. And it did just that with the help of Facebook, which led the pre-professional student organization to an inspirational 3-year-old girl.
  • BU joins nationwide concussion study — BU will begin baseline concussion screening of student-athletes this summer after being selected earlier this month to join the NCAA-Department of Defense Concussion Assessment, Research and Education Consortium.
  • Student team wins CyberSEED documentary challenge — Out of 30 schools — to include Brown, Penn State and Syracuse universities — it was BU’s documentary chosen as the best.
  • Record gift establishes Center for Supply Chain Management — Nicholas J. Giuffre ’78 contributed a $2.5 million blended gift to the BU Foundation, establishing the Nicholas J. Giuffre Center for Supply Chain Management in the College of Business.
  • CNN talent headlines Sankofa Conference — Marc Lamont Hill’s moving keynote speech spoke to the conference’s theme “Celebrating the past while embracing the future,” using his personal journey as a college drop-out through graduate school to becoming one of the leading intellectual voices in the country.
  • Tri-Sigma set to “Take My Hand” in NYC — Lena Kaback took her desire to help the homeless a step further this year by involving her sorority, which also strongly believes in giving back to those who are less fortunate.

More than 550 receive degrees

More than 550 students earned degrees at the fall commencement ceremonies Friday and Saturday, Dec. 16 and 17, in Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Students who earned the highest grade point average in their college were recognized during both ceremonies.

Webstream Replay

Honor Graduates

  • College of Liberal Arts — Thomas Matthew Smallets, economics
  • College of Education — Courtney Jo Hollenbach, early childhood education PK-4
  • Zeigler College of Business — Thomas Joseph Kleinhans, accounting
  • College of Science and Technology — Joshua William Smith, exercise science

Traditionally, BU faculty deliver the commencement address at the fall ceremonies. Timothy Knoster, professor of exceptionalities, spoke at the morning ceremony, and M. Ruhul Amin, professor of management and international business, delivered the afternoon address.

Tri-Sigma helps NYC homeless

Take My Hand

Lena Kaback has always been deeply impacted by the sight of homeless people on the street. Aware of how lucky she is to have a roof over her head and food to eat, the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority sister has always offered whatever she can to these individuals when she sees them. Kaback took her desire to help the homeless a step further this year by involving her sorority, which also strongly believes in giving back to those who are less fortunate.

“Being in college, having a roof to live under and having the support system we have as a sisterhood are all things we as a sorority are beyond grateful for,” Kaback said.

Through this philosophy of giving back, Kaback created the Take My Hand event. This event is a clothing and food drive to assist shelters and homeless people in New York City. The Tri-Sigma sisters will be taking a bus into Manhattan on Monday, Dec. 19, and walking all over the city to donate warm clothes, blankets, water, food, and care packages. If any supplies are left over from the donations collected, it will be given to the Covenant House, which is a shelter for kids and young adults that have suffered abuse, human trafficking, or abusive parents.

“This event gets us into the holiday spirit for a simple reason. Giving,” Kaback explains. “Giving will always be better than receiving.”

Demolition derby exhibit featured

Last Car Running

Photographer Christine Pearl will feature her photo essay collection, “Last Car Running” at Bloomsburg University’s Haas Gallery of Art. Her show opens Thursday, Dec. 22, in the Haas Gallery of Art. This show is free and open to the public.

“Last Car Running” focuses on demolition derby culture and its participants. Pearl’s interest in this subject stems from her attraction to people and parallels her reasons for taking photographs as a disabled artist. Her photography of rural demolition derby culture captures “contemporary redneck culture” and how the dwindling blue-collar class finds freedom in the automobile.

Pearl is a photographer with a private practice based in Washington, D.C. With a background in design and construction, Pearl began to shoot photographs in 2010 as a way to cope with disability. Photography become her physical therapy to deal with limited mobility. Since then, she has a long exhibition record from the District of Columbia, Texas, New York and internationally in Hungary. She also has an extensive publication history in a variety of media formats with her latest photo essay featured in Photo Technique Magazine and Rear Curtain. 

A closing reception will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 1 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with an artist lecture at 1:15 p.m. The Haas Gallery of Art is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Nursing major ready for combat support assignment

Madison Scripture

It was to be West Point Military Academy. That was the initial plan. But alas, Madison Scripture also saw nursing in her future in addition to the military. She found both at Bloomsburg University.

“Both the Army and the nursing professional value integrity immensely,” says Madison Scripture, who will be among three cadets commissioned Saturday as second lieutenants prior to graduating with bachelor’s degrees. “Another thing I love about nursing in the military is that as nurses, our civilian career relates directly to our mission in the Army.”

Scripture says BU’s Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program has already given her many opportunities to network and strive as a leader through internships and training experiences.

“As I continue after graduation, the Army will allow me to serve and will provide me with opportunities to continue to develop as a leader,” Scripture says. “ROTC has allowed me to travel the world, network, and improve my leadership abilities. Overall it has improved my confidence and made me a well-rounded individual.”

Specifically, she says ROTC has provided her opportunities as a nursing student to work with high ranking officers in Vietnam as well as in the Intensive Care Unit at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center in Fort Hood, Texas.

“I love Bloomsburg University and the opportunities I have been given,” says Scripture, adding she spent three years as a residence life community assistant and member of Alpha Phi Omega, a service fraternity. “To start, Bloomsburg has an amazing nursing program that develops some of the best nurses in Pennsylvania. While some of my peers spend their weekends and summers doing whatever they want, the ROTC program has sent me across the state, country and world to develop as a leader and to network.”

Business major ready for Army commission

Kaitlyn Gorgone

Kaitlyn Gorgone is a born leader. That’s why she majored in business administration management focused on supply chain management, as well as enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve prior to attending Bloomsburg University.

So, it was only a matter of time the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program came calling. It just so happened to come from within the family.

“My brother was in (ROTC), and he decided to have a talk with me about it,” said Gorgone, who will be among three cadets commissioned Saturday as second lieutenants prior to graduating with bachelor’s degrees. “I would say not only was he convincing, but I also was tired of just taking orders.”

At BU, the ROTC program prepares students for military service as commissioned officers in the active Army, or part-time in the Army Reserve or Army National Guard. Upon completion of the program, graduates are commissioned and then embark on specialized training in their first Army branch.

“ROTC is a leadership development course and with my bachelors’ degree in business (supply chain) management, leadership skills can either make or break your career,” Gorgone said. “I am also commissioning into the Quartermaster Corps, and that is a branch that deals with logistics. Logistics will be a part of my full-time (civilian) job.”

Giving the gift of experience

Milestone Gifts

The bell above Carver Hall recently rang to mark two milestone gifts that will support student experiences in the College of Liberal Arts and to celebrate the impact these gifts will have on our students and the Bloomsburg University community.

Jason Genovese, chair of the Department of Mass Communications, will begin working with students to create professionally produced video projects thanks to a major gift from Steph Pettit ’89 designated to establish the Bloomsburg University Production Company.

David Magolis, associate professor of mass communications, was recently chosen to receive the Kerby Confer Faculty Fellowship for Mass Communications. Magolis plans to use the funding from the fellowship to transform WBUQ, BU’s student-run radio station, into a professional media environment that will help provide students with the tools they need for a career in the radio industry.

Each contribution was made through the It’s Personal campaign with the specific intent of helping faculty members by providing them with the necessary funding to create new, high-impact experiential learning opportunities for their students.

Speaker’s Forum addresses environmental justice

Speaker's Forum

Led by five student speakers, the Department of Communication Studies Lambda Pi Eta’s annual Speaker’s Forum addressed the issues of environmental justice this fall capped by keynote speaker Tim Pelton, civic engagement coordinator.

Student Speakers

  • Rain Escobedo, sophomore geography and planning major
  • Taryn Riegel, sophomore special education major
  • James Strommer, freshman computer science major
  • William Turner, sophomore ASL/ criminal justice major
  • Jaime Yarosh, freshman geography and planning/political science major

Lambda Pi Eta is the honor society for communication studies. The honor society’s purpose is to recognize, foster and reward outstanding scholastic achievement in communication studies.

2016 Fall Senior Exit Show

Senior Art Exit Show

Bloomsburg University’s fall Senior Exit Show opened last week in Haas Gallery or Art with a reception and a series of lectures from the exhibiting student artists. The on-campus show runs through Friday, Dec. 16.

Student Presenters — Amber Martin, art history major; Ellen Brennan, art studio major; Paul Gonzalez, art studio major; Emmalee Harris, art studio major; Lisa Kamarzel, art studio major; and Khairi Potter, art studio major.

The Exit Show is a senior’s final capstone requirement for graduation and includes a selection of their best works and research.

Tri-Sigma set to "Take My Hand" in NYC

Take My Hand

Lena Kaback has always been deeply impacted by the sight of homeless people on the street. Aware of how lucky she is to have a roof over her head and food to eat, the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority sister has always offered whatever she can to these individuals when she sees them. Kaback took her desire to help the homeless a step further this year by involving her sorority, which also strongly believes in giving back to those who are less fortunate.

“Being in college, having a roof to live under and having the support system we have as a sisterhood are all things we as a sorority are beyond grateful for,” Kaback said.

Through this philosophy of giving back, Kaback created the Take My Hand event. This event is a clothing and food drive to assist shelters and homeless people in New York City. The Tri-Sigma sisters will be taking a bus into Manhattan on Monday, Dec. 19, and walking all over the city to donate warm clothes, blankets, water, food, and care packages. If any supplies are left over from the donations collected, it will be given to the Covenant House, which is a shelter for kids and young adults that have suffered abuse, human trafficking, or abusive parents.

“This event gets us into the holiday spirit for a simple reason. Giving,” Kaback explains. “Giving will always be better than receiving.”

A memorable learning experience

Living and Learning Communities foster a unique learning environment for students with similar majors, interests and goals living together on campus and experiencing a variety of learning opportunities in and out of the classroom.

One of the more active communities is the Frederick Douglass LLC, which regularly takes educational trips. This fall, they traveled to Virginia to visit Belle Grove Plantation — an authentic late 18th-century plantation house and estate.

For one student with a special connection to the LLC, the overnight trip left a lasting impression.

“My uncle did research and found out we were related to Frederick Douglass,” said Marqueshay Tomlinson, a freshman nursing major, admitting she really wants to learn more about her ancestry.

Tomlinson said this trip stuck out to her the most when she saw the list of LLC activities early in the semester given to her by her advisor, Brian Johnson, director of BU’s Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence. Tomlinson’s initial reaction was, “Wow… a slave plantation, oh my goodness!”

Solo student exhibition opens

Solo Student Exhibition

Featuring works by students Lisa Kamerzel, Krystal James and Wanda Riley, Bloomsburg University’s Department of Art and Art History will open the 2017 Student Exhibition Series show on Dec. 13. The show will run until Thursday, Feb. 23 in BU’s Gallery at Greenly Center, with a reception from 4 to 6 p.m.

This exhibition is free and open to the public.

Art studio major Lisa Kamerzel’s show, titled “Counting Bones,” expresses a personal narrative on her life, memories and family through paint, symbols and dissimilar materials. Individual artists Krystal James, art studio, and Wanda Riley, art studio and art history, are showing under one theme titled, “confliction (i.e.).” Their works reflect on human connection, nature, material and process.

The Student Exhibition Series allows selected students to experience a full professional gallery as a solo artist. Students chosen by a jury of art faculty must attend to all the details and demands they would encounter in a professional gallery setting. This show is supported by Bloomsburg University, the College of Liberal Arts, the Center for the Visual and Performing Arts and the Department of Art and Art History.

Graduate student earns recognition at ACSM conference

Tyler Meckes

Tyler Meckes has a unique perspective on his latest award-winning research on muscular responses. He’s actually experienced both sides of it … literally.

The first-year Bloomsburg University graduate student took a special interest in this topic as an undergraduate in exercise science, volunteering to be a subject. A year later, he’s a co-investigator and now a commendation award winner as a presenter from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Chapter Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Harrisburg.

“This study focused on muscular responses during the seated row, which is a commonly used resistance exercise,” said Meckes ‘16, who has been working with Swapan Mookerjee, professor of exercise science, on the research. “It involves various muscle groups in the upper body. With the advent of newer handle designs, it is not known if these muscular responses differ.”

According to Meckes, they then measured electrical activity (EMG) in selected muscle groups across two handle designs. In fact, the newer handle design did provoke a slightly different muscle response.

“While I am involved in several other projects in our Physiology Laboratory, this study gave me my first opportunity to present at a scientific venue,” Meckes said. “My goal is to pursue doctoral studies in the area of exercise and applied physiology. Therefore, it is essential I gain maximal experience in scientific research.”

PR class honored at Keystone Awards ceremony

Public Relations Workshop

A mass communications team from Kristie Byrum’s Public Relations Workshop Class was recently recognized by the Central Pennsylvania Public Relations Society of America chapter with an honorable mention in the Excellence in Student work category during the annual Keystone Awards ceremony in Harrisburg.

The students were honored for their work last year for the Greater Susquehanna Valley Chamber of Commerce’s Farm to Fork Initiative, according to Byrum, assistant professor of mass communications.

“This hands-on, real life experience gave me opportunities to apply my skills and learn an abundance of other skills,” said Jennifer Bello ’16, who graduated in May and is now pursuing a Master of Business Administration (MBA). “I’m a visual learner; lectures don’t work for me.”

The class puts students with a client for a semester-long project. Bello’s group worked with the Greater Susquehanna Valley Chamber of Commerce Farm to Fork Initiative, a program to promote locally grown food in local restaurants. Bello said they met with local council chairperson Bob Garrett, where they asked questions and conducted a needs assessment and communications audit to determine how to help them.

“A lot of my work, for the more interactive master’s classes, is applied work and real-life situational analyses,” Bello said. “So this project gave me a good first step of where to start and how to weave my way through on a larger scale project as well.”

Marketing majors shine at AMA regional competition

AMA Case Competition

Competing against the likes of Penn State, Maryland and Temple, teams of Bloomsburg University marketing majors showcased their talents placing second and third this fall at the American Marketing Association’s (AMA) fourth Annual Regional Case Competition at Johns Hopkins University.

The conference theme was “Play-By-Play of Sports Marketing.” As part of the conference, the students were challenged to create an advertising plan with a $5,000 budget for the sports app, TeamBuildr, which coaches and trainers use for all age groups to help develop and disperse workouts.

“We were asked to target the high school coaches in order to get more of them on board with purchasing the product,” said Sammi Maloof, junior marketing major, AMA social media chair. “Each group came up with different ideas and different plans.”

AMA Competing Groups

  • Group 1: Lauren Falkow, Joshua Gross and Matt Cotter
  • Group 2 (second place): Sammi Maloof, Nikki Slivka, Becka Mull, and Stef Haley
  • Group 3: Lorraine Piccirillo, Katrina Eicholtz, and Lawren Harris
  • Group 4 (third place): Matt Starcher, Sam Payson, and Vince Delucy

Nursing students help assess Montour County

Community Health Nurses

Portions of Montour County are a little healthier now thanks to the work of a few Bloomsburg University nursing students, who spent this fall conducting a semester-long health promotion project.

“We identified health problems in those areas through intensive data analysis, key-informant interviews, and windshield surveys,” said Amanda McIntyre, senior nursing major concentrating in gerontology. “After all data was collected and organized, we developed a formal teaching plan based on community needs.”

McIntyre said this semester’s experience helped her and fellow nursing majors prepare for the nursing field by showing them how to identify health needs in specific populations, such as vulnerable populations (children, elderly, disabled), and rural community populations.

“As future nurses, we will be sure to assess the demographics of our patients and identify further needs related to health care beyond just disease process,” McIntyre said. “Part of being a competent, compassionate nurse is caring for the whole patient, the whole picture, rather than just treating illness.”

The senior nursing class will present their health promotion projects on Monday, Dec. 5, at 9 a.m. in the KUB Ballroom.

Students share love of hacking

This Bloomsburg University club is making it cool to be nerdy. Just ask them.

“We’re a bunch really nerdy students, and we like to take our learning beyond the classroom," says Daniel Pany, senior computer science and digital forensics major, president of the Bloomsburg Cyber Defense Club (BCDC). BCDC focuses on studying hacking and security techniques, working to hone their skills for cyber defense competitions and their future in digital forensics.

“We get to play with a lot of cool toys and do nefarious acts in a controlled environment,” said Kyle Mumper, senior computer science and digital forensics major, club treasurer.

BCDC prepares for competitions like Cyber Seed, Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition, and GrrCON, which allows them to build their network with professionals in the industry and also show what they have been training for in the competitions. According to Vincent Phan, senior digital forensics major, club secretary, he has learned things during the competitions that he might have not learned until his senior year.

“When I first started here I didn’t know anything,” Mumper said. “I had basic computer knowledge, but I’ve learned a lot in the classroom and even more through the club.”

Demolition derby exhibit featured

Last Car Running

Photographer Christine Pearl will feature her photo essay collection, “Last Car Running” at Bloomsburg University’s Haas Gallery of Art. Her show opens Thursday, Dec. 22, in the Haas Gallery of Art. This show is free and open to the public.

“Last Car Running” focuses on demolition derby culture and its participants. Pearl’s interest in this subject stems from her attraction to people and parallels her reasons for taking photographs as a disabled artist. Her photography of rural demolition derby culture captures “contemporary redneck culture” and how the dwindling blue-collar class finds freedom in the automobile.

Pearl is a photographer with a private practice based in Washington, D.C. With a background in design and construction, Pearl began to shoot photographs in 2010 as a way to cope with disability. Photography become her physical therapy to deal with limited mobility. Since then, she has a long exhibition record from the District of Columbia, Texas, New York and internationally in Hungary. She also has an extensive publication history in a variety of media formats with her latest photo essay featured in Photo Technique Magazine and Rear Curtain. 

A closing reception will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 1 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with an artist lecture at 1:15 p.m. The Haas Gallery of Art is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

BU among "Best Bang for the Buck"

Academic Quad

Bloomsburg University was named this fall among the top of Washington Monthly’s list for Best Bang for the Buck in the Northeast.

BU ranked at 125 out of 386 colleges and universities on the list, and was the second highest PASSHE school. Washington Monthly ranked their list based on best overall graduation rate, Pell Grant performance, First-generation student performance, earnings performance, and net price in the Northeast schools. Making it the best education for the best price.

BU ranked ahead of Millersville, Shippensburg, East Stroudsburg and Slippery Rock. BU was also listed higher than Temple University, Philadelphia University, Johns Hopkins University, Drexel University, and University of Connecticut. The complete list of rankings are available on Washington Monthly.

One step closer to graduation

First World Ceremony

One step closer for these Class of 2016 members as they were honored Tuesday night during the First World Graduation Ceremony by Bloomsburg University’s Office of Multicultural Affairs.

The bi-annual First World ceremony is celebrated each December and May to congratulate the achievements — academic and leadership roles — of BU’s multicultural students at the baccalaureate and graduate degree levels.

Those honored were: Tyeriah Smith, KhaDeidra R Stuckey, Linda Ngohe Ehabil, Ajee Johnson, Raijene Dreuitt, Shirley Neequaye, Nana Yaw Effah, Khadijah Convington, Akia D. Williams, Irenes Sanchez, DuPrese Northern, Michael Morton-Brown, Ceirra Evans, and Daneisha Williams.

Trustees approve a new institutional scholarship

Council of Trustees

Bloomsburg University’s Council of Trustees approved a new institutional scholarship for 2017-18 during the Dec. 7 quarterly meeting. The university will award 60 renewable $3,000 scholarships to first-year students residing in Pennsylvania with an academic profile of an average SAT score of 1117 and 3.8 GPA. The scholarships support BU’s strategic enrollment efforts and Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) performance metrics.

Also during the meeting, the Trustees:

  • Approved a resolution recognizing Trustees LaRoy Davis and Kenneth Stolarick for their dedication and service.
  • Approved the annual resolution certifying the Bloomsburg University Foundation’s, Community Government Association, Inc.’s and Husky Research Corporation, Inc.’s compliance with Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education policy.
  • Approved the annual financial audit report for fiscal year 2015-16.
  • Heard a presentation on the Rehabilitation Justice Certificate program by James Brown, dean of BU’s College of Liberal of Arts. Beginning in spring 2017, liberal arts faculty in humanities and social sciences will deliver courses to 30 incarcerated students at Muncy and Mahanoy State Correctional Institutions. The students can earn up to 24 credits. The program is funded by the Second Chance Pell initiative.
  • Seven retirees were honored for emeriti status: Paul Hartung, from the Department of Mathematical and Digital Sciences, Timothy McConnell, Department of Exercise Science, Eric Rawson, Department of Exercise Science, Sharon Solloway, Department of Academic Enrichment, Barbara Wilson, Department of Exceptionality Programs, Diana Zoelle, Department of Political Science, and Bonnie Martin, Marketing and Communications, non-instructional emerita.
  • Approved the following schedule for quarterly meetings, all Wednesdays: March 7, June 13, Sept. 19 and Dec. 5, 2017, and March 6 and June 13, 2018.

Legacy of Leadership Awards

Hannah Breckinridge

Bloomsburg University’s Dr. H Preston Herring Scholarship is awarded to students who demonstrate the former administrator’s most important leadership qualities, which include service, modesty, and commitment.

Hannah Breckinridge, a junior speech-language pathology major, represented just that last semester, earning the scholarship and a special recognition at the upcoming third annual Legacy of Leadership Awards.

“I felt very honored to receive this scholarship based off of how I perceive myself in my personal essay and through the volunteer work I have done throughout my time at Bloomsburg,” Breckinridge said. “I think I have gained so many leadership skills through attending workshops for CLE leadership certification, delivering workshops for my job at The Writing Center, and through my involvement with various clubs.”

The Dr. H Preston Herring Scholarship was founded as a tribute to Herring who served as vice president of student affairs for 15 years before passing away due to a battle with cancer in 2009. Ginny Herring created this scholarship in 2014 to honor her husband. She wanted to show that students like Breckinridge and the past recipients are appreciated and that they have not been overlooked. Nominations are being accepted until Jan. 22, 2017.

Career boot camps set for spring semester

Career Boot Camp

In today's competitive job market, employers are looking for more than just good grades. They want a clean, concise resume, an applicant who shows up prepared and confident, someone who articulates why they are a good candidate for the organization and an employee who performs in a professional manner.

Seniors and juniors can learn how to leverage skills and experiences to be successful in the transition from student to professional by attending a Career Intensive Boot Camp on Feb. 10 to 12 or March 3 to 5. Attendees will participate in 20-plus unique sessions, including: Compensation Considerations, Debunking the "Career Path" Myth, The Shocking Truth of Getting Hired, Making Connections on LinkedIn, 3 Mock Interviews, Office Communications, a Professional Etiquette Dinner and more.

There is also the opportunity to network with more than 60 alumni, organization representatives, faculty and staff. Sessions are held at the Greenly Center in downtown Bloomsburg. Shuttle from campus is available. Space is limited.

Digital Forensics Club takes on GrrCON

GrrCON

This fall, the Bloomsburg Digital Forensic Club attended the GrrCON computer security conference for the third consecutive year with 34 students and an alum joining Phil Polstra, associate professor of digital forensics. It was Polstra’s fifth consecutive year as a speaker at this event.

GrrCON attracts speakers from around the world and features numerous speaking tracks, workshops, villages, and competitions. This year some new villages appeared, including an open hacking village, car hacking village, and Internet of Things (IoT) hacking village.

“My favorite highlight had to be learning at the car hacking village,” said Jesse Mancuso, a senior digital forensics major. “There are a lot of ‘villages’ that allow you to learn things like lock picking, wireless hacking, and car hacking."

As in years past, students spent many hours in these villages learning about new areas in security and forensics.

“This competition really opens your eyes as to how much information is available floating around the internet,” said Matthew Shafer, a senior digital forensics major. “Our society has sacrificed security for convenience, and it’s never more evident than when I can identify a target’s childhood pet’s nickname because one family member with an open social media account left a comment on a photo that was posted years earlier.”

Testing Center earns NCTA certification

Certified Test Center

Bloomsburg University was recently certified as a National College Testing Association (NCTA) national test center. Bloomsburg is the fourth testing center in Pennsylvania to earn this distinction and the first testing center within the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE).

With this national certification, the number and types of tests permitted to be administered at BU will increase, which provides additional testing opportunities for BU students as well as for community and regional examinees,” said Kathy Kollar-Valovage, BU testing center coordinator.

NCTA is a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of professionalism and quality in the administration of testing services and programs, including issues related to test administration, test accessibility, test development, test scoring, and assessment.

This distinction recognizes BU’s testing center locally and nationally, and it ensures any individual who uses the testing center is assured their testing needs are met with the highest accepted standards and procedures for all types of testing.

Survey seeks opinions of freshmen, seniors

NSSE Survey

Each member of Bloomsburg University’s first-year and senior classes is invited to share opinions about his or her experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). According to Sheila Dove Jones, assistant vice president for planning and assessment, answers to the online survey will reveal students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results will be used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

Jones said several email messages containing a link to the survey will be sent to BU’s freshmen and seniors in February and March. She encourages students to respond by April 7.

In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey by April 7 will automatically be entered into a random drawing to win one of these 84 prizes: one $150 Amazon gift card, one of two $100 Amazon gift cards, one of nine $50 Amazon gift cards, one of three BU tailgate folding chairs, one of three BU stadium blankets, one of six BU travel mugs, one of five BU smartphone power banks, one of seven BU drawstring bags, one of 20 BU spirit flags, or one of 28 BU iPod armband holders. A student’s chances of winning depend on how many students complete the survey; the last time this survey was administered, 635 students responded. Thus, a student’s odds of winning are roughly 1 in 8. The Web version of the survey is available at www.nssesurvey.org.

“All student responses are valuable for helping us compare the experiences they report with those of students at hundreds of other colleges and universities,” Jones said. “The results will also indicate important trends in undergraduate education. More voices will make the results more valid.”

Approximately 4,000 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 560 U.S. colleges and universities and approximately 322,500 first-year students and seniors participated in the 2016 survey.

Forensics Team caps semester with Holiday Tourney

Forensics Team

Bloomsburg University’s Forensics (Speech and Debate) Team recently won the fifth place Team Sweepstakes award at the Collegiate Forensic Association’s Annual Holiday Tournament held at Randolph Macon College in Ashland, Virginia. BU competed against Brooklyn College, Davis and Elkins College, Florida College, Lord Fairfax Community College, Lynchburg College, Randolph-Macon College, Shepherd University, University of North Carolina – Charlotte, and the University of Richmond.

A group of 12 students competed at the Holiday Tournament, including seven of whom won individual awards:

  • Abbey Porambo: second in Poetry; fifth in After Dinner Speaking; fifth in Dramatic Duo with Jayleen Alvarado
  • Jayleen Alvarado: second in Lincoln-Douglas Debate; third in Communication Analysis; fifth in Dramatic Duo with Abbey Porambo; sixth in Pentathlon
  • Anna Scott: third in Informative; fifth Declamation
  • Tarah Kelley: second in After Dinner Speaking; sixth in Declamation
  • Alisa Evans: first in Best Parliamentary Debate Speaker
  • Cameron Ostrowski: fifth in Single Dramatic Interpretation
  • Deanna Campion: sixth in Extemporaneous Speaking

Theresa Clark, Tobias Sonnenberg, Stijn Gillaerts, Amy Bitar, and Thomas Weber also competed at the CFA Holiday Tournament.

Harry C. “Neil” Strine IV, director of forensics and chair of the Department of Political Science, served as a speech and debate judge at the competition. Four BU alumni — Delaney Hellman, Dan Pagana, Jackson Staples, and Charles Humphrys — also judged events at the tournament. Erin Brummett, assistant professor of communication studies, and Timothy Oleksiak, assistant professor of English, assist Strine with coaching students on the BU team.

FOCUS concludes fall semester with campus service

Bethel Deliverance International

Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Dec. 11, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and Finals Week and holiday blessings. Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods at 570-389-4091 for details.

Tri-Sigma set to "Take My Hand" in NYC

Take My Hand

Lena Kaback has always been deeply impacted by the sight of homeless people on the street. Aware of how lucky she is to have a roof over her head and food to eat, the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority sister has always offered whatever she can to these individuals when she sees them. Kaback took her desire to help the homeless a step further this year by involving her sorority, which also strongly believes in giving back to those who are less fortunate.

“Being in college, having a roof to live under and having the support system we have as a sisterhood are all things we as a sorority are beyond grateful for,” Kaback said.

Through this philosophy of giving back, Kaback created the Take My Hand event. This event is a clothing and food drive to assist shelters and homeless people in New York City. The Tri-Sigma sisters will be taking a bus into Manhattan on Monday, Dec. 19, and walking all over the city to donate warm clothes, blankets, water, food, and care packages. If any supplies are left over from the donations collected, it will be given to the Covenant House, which is a shelter for kids and young adults that have suffered abuse, human trafficking, or abusive parents.

“This event gets us into the holiday spirit for a simple reason. Giving,” Kaback explains. “Giving will always be better than receiving.”

Marketing majors shine at AMA regional competition

AMA Case Competition

Competing against the likes of Penn State, Maryland and Temple, teams of Bloomsburg University marketing majors showcased their talents placing second and third this fall at the American Marketing Association’s (AMA) fourth Annual Regional Case Competition at Johns Hopkins University.

The conference theme was “Play-By-Play of Sports Marketing.” As part of the conference, the students were challenged to create an advertising plan with a $5,000 budget for the sports app, TeamBuildr, which coaches and trainers use for all age groups to help develop and disperse workouts.

“We were asked to target the high school coaches in order to get more of them on board with purchasing the product,” said Sammi Maloof, junior marketing major, AMA social media chair. “Each group came up with different ideas and different plans.”

AMA Competing Groups

  • Group 1: Lauren Falkow, Joshua Gross and Matt Cotter
  • Group 2 (second place): Sammi Maloof, Nikki Slivka, Becka Mull, and Stef Haley
  • Group 3: Lorraine Piccirillo, Katrina Eicholtz, and Lawren Harris
  • Group 4 (third place): Matt Starcher, Sam Payson, and Vince Delucy

Nursing students help assess Montour County

Community Health Nurses

Portions of Montour County are a little healthier now thanks to the work of a few Bloomsburg University nursing students, who spent this fall conducting a semester-long health promotion project.

“We identified health problems in those areas through intensive data analysis, key-informant interviews, and windshield surveys,” said Amanda McIntyre, senior nursing major concentrating in gerontology. “After all data was collected and organized, we developed a formal teaching plan based on community needs.”

McIntyre said this semester’s experience helped her and fellow nursing majors prepare for the nursing field by showing them how to identify health needs in specific populations, such as vulnerable populations (children, elderly, disabled), and rural community populations.

“As future nurses, we will be sure to assess the demographics of our patients and identify further needs related to health care beyond just disease process,” McIntyre said. “Part of being a competent, compassionate nurse is caring for the whole patient, the whole picture, rather than just treating illness.”

The senior nursing class will present their health promotion projects on Monday, Dec. 5, at 9 a.m. in the KUB Ballroom.

Forensics Team caps semester with Holiday Tourney

Forensics Team

Bloomsburg University’s Forensics (Speech and Debate) Team recently won the fifth place Team Sweepstakes award at the Collegiate Forensic Association’s Annual Holiday Tournament held at Randolph Macon College in Ashland, Virginia. BU competed against Brooklyn College, Davis and Elkins College, Florida College, Lord Fairfax Community College, Lynchburg College, Randolph-Macon College, Shepherd University, University of North Carolina – Charlotte, and the University of Richmond.

A group of 12 students competed at the Holiday Tournament, including seven of whom won individual awards:

  • Abbey Porambo: second in Poetry; fifth in After Dinner Speaking; fifth in Dramatic Duo with Jayleen Alvarado
  • Jayleen Alvarado: second in Lincoln-Douglas Debate; third in Communication Analysis; fifth in Dramatic Duo with Abbey Porambo; sixth in Pentathlon
  • Anna Scott: third in Informative; fifth Declamation
  • Tarah Kelley: second in After Dinner Speaking; sixth in Declamation
  • Alisa Evans: first in Best Parliamentary Debate Speaker
  • Cameron Ostrowski: fifth in Single Dramatic Interpretation
  • Deanna Campion: sixth in Extemporaneous Speaking

Theresa Clark, Tobias Sonnenberg, Stijn Gillaerts, Amy Bitar, and Thomas Weber also competed at the CFA Holiday Tournament.

Harry C. “Neil” Strine IV, director of forensics and chair of the Department of Political Science, served as a speech and debate judge at the competition. Four BU alumni — Delaney Hellman, Dan Pagana, Jackson Staples, and Charles Humphrys — also judged events at the tournament. Erin Brummett, assistant professor of communication studies, and Timothy Oleksiak, assistant professor of English, assist Strine with coaching students on the BU team.

Students share love of hacking

This Bloomsburg University club is making it cool to be nerdy. Just ask them.

“We’re a bunch really nerdy students, and we like to take our learning beyond the classroom," says Daniel Pany, senior computer science and digital forensics major, president of the Bloomsburg Cyber Defense Club (BCDC). BCDC focuses on studying hacking and security techniques, working to hone their skills for cyber defense competitions and their future in digital forensics.

“We get to play with a lot of cool toys and do nefarious acts in a controlled environment,” said Kyle Mumper, senior computer science and digital forensics major, club treasurer.

BCDC prepares for competitions like Cyber Seed, Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition, and GrrCON, which allows them to build their network with professionals in the industry and also show what they have been training for in the competitions. According to Vincent Phan, senior digital forensics major, club secretary, he has learned things during the competitions that he might have not learned until his senior year.

“When I first started here I didn’t know anything,” Mumper said. “I had basic computer knowledge, but I’ve learned a lot in the classroom and even more through the club.”

Digital Forensics Club takes on GrrCON

GrrCON

This fall, the Bloomsburg Digital Forensic Club attended the GrrCON computer security conference for the third consecutive year with 34 students and an alum joining Phil Polstra, associate professor of digital forensics. It was Polstra’s fifth consecutive year as a speaker at this event.

GrrCON attracts speakers from around the world and features numerous speaking tracks, workshops, villages, and competitions. This year some new villages appeared, including an open hacking village, car hacking village, and Internet of Things (IoT) hacking village.

“My favorite highlight had to be learning at the car hacking village,” said Jesse Mancuso, a senior digital forensics major. “There are a lot of ‘villages’ that allow you to learn things like lock picking, wireless hacking, and car hacking."

As in years past, students spent many hours in these villages learning about new areas in security and forensics.

“This competition really opens your eyes as to how much information is available floating around the internet,” said Matthew Shafer, a senior digital forensics major. “Our society has sacrificed security for convenience, and it’s never more evident than when I can identify a target’s childhood pet’s nickname because one family member with an open social media account left a comment on a photo that was posted years earlier.”

Legacy of Leadership Awards

Hannah Breckinridge

Bloomsburg University’s Dr. H Preston Herring Scholarship is awarded to students who demonstrate the former administrator’s most important leadership qualities, which include service, modesty, and commitment.

Hannah Breckinridge, a junior speech-language pathology major, represented just that last semester, earning the scholarship and a special recognition at the upcoming third annual Legacy of Leadership Awards.

“I felt very honored to receive this scholarship based off of how I perceive myself in my personal essay and through the volunteer work I have done throughout my time at Bloomsburg,” Breckinridge said. “I think I have gained so many leadership skills through attending workshops for CLE leadership certification, delivering workshops for my job at The Writing Center, and through my involvement with various clubs.”

The Dr. H Preston Herring Scholarship was founded as a tribute to Herring who served as vice president of student affairs for 15 years before passing away due to a battle with cancer in 2009. Ginny Herring created this scholarship in 2014 to honor her husband. She wanted to show that students like Breckinridge and the past recipients are appreciated and that they have not been overlooked. Nominations are being accepted until Jan. 22, 2017.

Bloomsburg University welcomes new Trustees

Two alumni will serve as newly selected members of Bloomsburg University's Council of Trustees. Edward G. Edwards, ’73, and Dr. Brian O’Donnell, ’87, were nominated and appointed by Governor Tom Wolf and approved by the Pennsylvania Senate on Oct. 25.

“We are honored to have Mr. Edwards and Dr. O’Donnell join the Bloomsburg University Council of Trustees at this important time in the university’s history,” said Council Chairman Patrick Wilson. “Both men bring unique professional backgrounds and are committed to advancing the university’s mission to prepare students for personal and professional success in an increasingly complex global environment.”

Edward G. Edwards

Ed Edwards served as the president and CEO of Columbia-Montour Chamber of Commerce and the Columbia Alliance for Economic Growth for 31 years. During much of that time he also served as an administrator of the Columbia County Industrial Development Authority. Edwards was instrumental in the recruitment of new businesses and assisted in the expansion of pre-existing industries in Columbia County. He secured more than $3 million in funding to create the Columbia County Business Park and obtained over $4 million in state and federal funding to create the Bloomsburg Regional Technology Center in 2005.

Edwards served as chairman of the Industrial Modernization Center, which serves seven counties in Central Pennsylvania, and was a member of the Central Pennsylvania Workforce Development Council. A past chairman of the Pennsylvania Association of Chamber Professionals, Edwards was one of the founders of the Chamber’s leadership development program, Leadership Central Penn, serving Columbia and Montour counties. Edwards graduated from Bloomsburg University in 1973 with a bachelor’s degree in secondary education and was honored with the Outstanding Alumni Award in 2005.

Dr. Brian O’Donnell

An optometrist serving the Wilkes-Barre area, Brian O’Donnell, O.D. received his master of science degree in audiology from Bloomsburg in 1987 and a doctorate of optometry degree from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry in Philadelphia in 1992. The founder of New Era Eye Care in Shavertown, O’Donnell is a member of the American Optometric Association and the Pennsylvania Optometric Association. He serves his local community as a member of several boards and founded the Gift for Sight program, which aids underprivileged people with vision problems in three Northeastern Pennsylvania counties by having eye doctors donate a portion of their eyeglass sales.

O’Donnell has been in private practice for over two decades. He and his wife Marcy, who is also a Bloomsburg University graduate, have one son and reside in Luzerne County.

The Council of Trustees meets quarterly to review the administration, fiscal management and the physical plant of the university. Members are nominated by the governor with the approval and consent of the state senate.

Career boot camps set for spring semester

Career Boot Camp

In today's competitive job market, employers are looking for more than just good grades. They want a clean, concise resume, an applicant who shows up prepared and confident, someone who articulates why they are a good candidate for the organization and an employee who performs in a professional manner.

Seniors and juniors can learn how to leverage skills and experiences to be successful in the transition from student to professional by attending a Career Intensive Boot Camp on Feb. 10 to 12 or March 3 to 5. Attendees will participate in 20-plus unique sessions, including: Compensation Considerations, Debunking the "Career Path" Myth, The Shocking Truth of Getting Hired, Making Connections on LinkedIn, 3 Mock Interviews, Office Communications, a Professional Etiquette Dinner and more.

There is also the opportunity to network with more than 60 alumni, organization representatives, faculty and staff. Sessions are held at the Greenly Center in downtown Bloomsburg. Shuttle from campus is available. Space is limited.

Survey seeks opinions of freshmen, seniors

NSSE Survey

Each member of Bloomsburg University’s first-year and senior classes is invited to share opinions about his or her experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). According to Sheila Dove Jones, assistant vice president for planning and assessment, answers to the online survey will reveal students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results will be used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

Jones said several email messages containing a link to the survey will be sent to BU’s freshmen and seniors in February and March. She encourages students to respond by April 7.

In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey by April 7 will automatically be entered into a random drawing to win one of these 84 prizes: one $150 Amazon gift card, one of two $100 Amazon gift cards, one of nine $50 Amazon gift cards, one of three BU tailgate folding chairs, one of three BU stadium blankets, one of six BU travel mugs, one of five BU smartphone power banks, one of seven BU drawstring bags, one of 20 BU spirit flags, or one of 28 BU iPod armband holders. A student’s chances of winning depend on how many students complete the survey; the last time this survey was administered, 635 students responded. Thus, a student’s odds of winning are roughly 1 in 8. The Web version of the survey is available at www.nssesurvey.org.

“All student responses are valuable for helping us compare the experiences they report with those of students at hundreds of other colleges and universities,” Jones said. “The results will also indicate important trends in undergraduate education. More voices will make the results more valid.”

Approximately 4,000 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 560 U.S. colleges and universities and approximately 322,500 first-year students and seniors participated in the 2016 survey.

Feed a Husky

With the help of local pop-punk band Send Request, Richard Ganahl’s Publicity and Public Relations class unofficially kicked off the holiday season of giving with a benefit concert in the McCormick Center just prior to Thanksgiving break.

Nearly 150 canned food items and $125 in cash was raised in support of the Hungry Huskies initiative — an on- and off-campus initiative partnering with the community launched this past summer to help reduce student hunger.

Theta Tau Omega hosts Cure for Christmas 5k

Theta Tau Omega

For the fourth year in a row, the sorority Theta Tau Omega is hosting a Cure for Christmas 5k in honor of an alumna’s younger brother who passed away from childhood cancer. The 5k takes place on Sunday, Dec. 4, from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Student Recreation Center and all proceeds from this event go to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Becca Erksine, a Theta Tau Omega sister and alumna, created the Cure for Christmas Childhood Cancer walk to give back to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in honor of her younger brother, Daulton, who lost his fight against childhood cancer. Last year, Theta Tau Omega raised a total of $6,700 from the walk and they hope to reach their target goal of $7,000 this year.

The registration fee is $5 and every student who attends will receive three hours of community service. Free food and drink is available during the walk including coffee, hot chocolate, water, bagels, and donuts from Dunkin’ Donuts. There will also be a D.J. and a station where participants can make Christmas cards that will be mailed out to patients in The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

History Club launches film screening series

Bloomsburg University's History Club will be screening episodes from “The Pacific” miniseries on Thursday, Dec. 1, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. in McCormick Center 1303. This will be the first film screening in a series that will continue next semester!

These film screenings will provide an opportunity to connect with the History Club, the university and the community. Two Episodes from, The Pacific, a miniseries about a marine division who fought in the Pacific theatre during World War II will be shown.

Additional commentary will follow to dive further into how soldiers fought in the war and their thoughts in the battle. Jeff Long, associate professor of history, and Kevin Kesselring, club vice president, will hold discussion after the screening and then open up for a question and answer segment. This event is free and open to the public, come join History Club and watch history in action!

Nursing students help assess Montour County

Community Health Nurses

Portions of Montour County are a little healthier now thanks to the work of a few Bloomsburg University nursing students, who spent this fall conducting a semester-long health promotion project.

“We identified health problems in those areas through intensive data analysis, key-informant interviews, and windshield surveys,” said Amanda McIntyre, senior nursing major concentrating in gerontology. “After all data was collected and organized, we developed a formal teaching plan based on community needs.”

McIntyre said this semester’s experience helped her and fellow nursing majors prepare for the nursing field by showing them how to identify health needs in specific populations, such as vulnerable populations (children, elderly, disabled), and rural community populations.

“As future nurses, we will be sure to assess the demographics of our patients and identify further needs related to health care beyond just disease process,” McIntyre said. “Part of being a competent, compassionate nurse is caring for the whole patient, the whole picture, rather than just treating illness.”

The senior nursing class will present their health promotion projects on Monday, Dec. 5, at 9 a.m. in the KUB Ballroom.

Theta Tau Omega hosts Cure for Christmas 5k

Theta Tau Omega

For the fourth year in a row, the sorority Theta Tau Omega is hosting a Cure for Christmas 5k in honor of an alumna’s younger brother who passed away from childhood cancer. The 5k takes place on Sunday, Dec. 4, from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Student Recreation Center and all proceeds from this event go to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Becca Erksine, a Theta Tau Omega sister and alumna, created the Cure for Christmas Childhood Cancer walk to give back to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in honor of her younger brother, Daulton, who lost his fight against childhood cancer. Last year, Theta Tau Omega raised a total of $6,700 from the walk and they hope to reach their target goal of $7,000 this year.

The registration fee is $5 and every student who attends will receive three hours of community service. Free food and drink is available during the walk including coffee, hot chocolate, water, bagels, and donuts from Dunkin’ Donuts. There will also be a D.J. and a station where participants can make Christmas cards that will be mailed out to patients in The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Forensics Team caps semester with Holiday Tourney

Forensics Team

Bloomsburg University’s Forensics (Speech and Debate) Team recently won the fifth place Team Sweepstakes award at the Collegiate Forensic Association’s Annual Holiday Tournament held at Randolph Macon College in Ashland, Virginia. BU competed against Brooklyn College, Davis and Elkins College, Florida College, Lord Fairfax Community College, Lynchburg College, Randolph-Macon College, Shepherd University, University of North Carolina – Charlotte, and the University of Richmond.

A group of 12 students competed at the Holiday Tournament, including seven of whom won individual awards:

  • Abbey Porambo: second in Poetry; fifth in After Dinner Speaking; fifth in Dramatic Duo with Jayleen Alvarado
  • Jayleen Alvarado: second in Lincoln-Douglas Debate; third in Communication Analysis; fifth in Dramatic Duo with Abbey Porambo; sixth in Pentathlon
  • Anna Scott: third in Informative; fifth Declamation
  • Tarah Kelley: second in After Dinner Speaking; sixth in Declamation
  • Alisa Evans: first in Best Parliamentary Debate Speaker
  • Cameron Ostrowski: fifth in Single Dramatic Interpretation
  • Deanna Campion: sixth in Extemporaneous Speaking

Theresa Clark, Tobias Sonnenberg, Stijn Gillaerts, Amy Bitar, and Thomas Weber also competed at the CFA Holiday Tournament.

Harry C. “Neil” Strine IV, director of forensics and chair of the Department of Political Science, served as a speech and debate judge at the competition. Four BU alumni — Delaney Hellman, Dan Pagana, Jackson Staples, and Charles Humphrys — also judged events at the tournament. Erin Brummett, assistant professor of communication studies, and Timothy Oleksiak, assistant professor of English, assist Strine with coaching students on the BU team.

Philadelphia​’s ​Best Value: Center City MBA

Center City MBA

As emerging robotics, artificial intelligence, augmented reality intensifying global and national competition, the Philadelphia region needs to rapidly work together to prepare its infrastructure, workforce and entrepreneurs for exponential change. The Philadelphia Acceleration Summit was part of Philadelphia’s celebration of Global Entrepreneurship Week across 190 countries.

Bloomsburg University’s Center City MBA program was showcased by Jeffrey Krug, Dean, Zeigler College of Business, Bloomsburg University.

“More than ever, ​higher education needs to differentiate and produce measurable results for students and parents,” said ​Krug. “​The MBA market is highly competitive. Our strong value, brand, flexible-offerings combined with our 50 percent lower tuition make Bloomsburg’s Center City MBA the best value in Philadelphia.”

Krug’s remarks highlighted the Center City MBA’s flexible offerings for students juggling busy jobs, families and responsibilities. The Bloomsburg Center City MBA programs are offered at 701 Market Street in Philadelphia and online.

Bloomsburg means business,“ added Krug. "We are rapidly adjusting our programs to meet changing needs. Yes, our brand is strong, our programs are strong. But we are continually working with business leaders, alumni and friends of the University to make our programs even stronger."

Legacy of Leadership Awards

Hannah Breckinridge

Bloomsburg University’s Dr. H Preston Herring Scholarship is awarded to students who demonstrate the former administrator’s most important leadership qualities, which include service, modesty, and commitment.

Hannah Breckinridge, a junior speech-language pathology major, represented just that last semester, earning the scholarship and a special recognition at the upcoming third annual Legacy of Leadership Awards.

“I felt very honored to receive this scholarship based off of how I perceive myself in my personal essay and through the volunteer work I have done throughout my time at Bloomsburg,” Breckinridge said. “I think I have gained so many leadership skills through attending workshops for CLE leadership certification, delivering workshops for my job at The Writing Center, and through my involvement with various clubs.”

The Dr. H Preston Herring Scholarship was founded as a tribute to Herring who served as vice president of student affairs for 15 years before passing away due to a battle with cancer in 2009. Ginny Herring created this scholarship in 2014 to honor her husband. She wanted to show that students like Breckinridge and the past recipients are appreciated and that they have not been overlooked. Nominations are being accepted until Jan. 22, 2017.

Career boot camps set for spring semester

Career Boot Camp

In today's competitive job market, employers are looking for more than just good grades. They want a clean, concise resume, an applicant who shows up prepared and confident, someone who articulates why they are a good candidate for the organization and an employee who performs in a professional manner.

Seniors and juniors can learn how to leverage skills and experiences to be successful in the transition from student to professional by attending a Career Intensive Boot Camp on Feb. 10 to 12 or March 3 to 5. Attendees will participate in 20-plus unique sessions, including: Compensation Considerations, Debunking the "Career Path" Myth, The Shocking Truth of Getting Hired, Making Connections on LinkedIn, 3 Mock Interviews, Office Communications, a Professional Etiquette Dinner and more.

There is also the opportunity to network with more than 60 alumni, organization representatives, faculty and staff. Sessions are held at the Greenly Center in downtown Bloomsburg. Shuttle from campus is available. Space is limited.

Survey seeks opinions of freshmen, seniors

NSSE Survey

Each member of Bloomsburg University’s first-year and senior classes is invited to share opinions about his or her experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). According to Sheila Dove Jones, assistant vice president for planning and assessment, answers to the online survey will reveal students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results will be used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

Jones said several email messages containing a link to the survey will be sent to BU’s freshmen and seniors in February and March. She encourages students to respond by April 7.

In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey by April 7 will automatically be entered into a random drawing to win one of these 84 prizes: one $150 Amazon gift card, one of two $100 Amazon gift cards, one of nine $50 Amazon gift cards, one of three BU tailgate folding chairs, one of three BU stadium blankets, one of six BU travel mugs, one of five BU smartphone power banks, one of seven BU drawstring bags, one of 20 BU spirit flags, or one of 28 BU iPod armband holders. A student’s chances of winning depend on how many students complete the survey; the last time this survey was administered, 635 students responded. Thus, a student’s odds of winning are roughly 1 in 8. The Web version of the survey is available at www.nssesurvey.org.

“All student responses are valuable for helping us compare the experiences they report with those of students at hundreds of other colleges and universities,” Jones said. “The results will also indicate important trends in undergraduate education. More voices will make the results more valid.”

Approximately 4,000 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 560 U.S. colleges and universities and approximately 322,500 first-year students and seniors participated in the 2016 survey.

Special Topics in Field Geology

Their textbook was Lake Michigan.

And for the group of Bloomsburg University students who spent two weeks this summer in the field exploring different geoscience and environmental aspects of the Michigan Basin, they wouldn’t have wanted it any other way.

“My biggest take away is the picture this trip painted for me,” said Mitchell Lenker, a junior geology major, professional track. “I have learned so much in the classroom. This however only goes so far for someone's understanding of the topics at hand. This trip helped tie the topics in the classroom into real world applications.”

The unique summer course, Special Topics in Field Geology, was led by faculty Matt Ricker, Jen Whisner and Chris Whisner, of the Department of Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences faculty. During their two-week field experience students learned field study techniques and how to analyze field observations that culminated in student-directed field presentations.

“The experiences on this trip were once-in-a-lifetime opportunities,” Lenker said. “Getting to be in the field with a professor for one day is one thing, but being about to spend two full weeks with three amazing professors you not only gain great field skills, you also make some pretty great friends and connections that could help you in the future.”

Forensics Team showcases talents in fall tourneys

Speech and Debate Team

Bloomsburg University’s Forensics Speech and Debate Team recently competed in two tournaments as part of its fall semester schedule. The team placed fourth at the Collegiate Forensic Association Tournament and second at the CFA-Morgan State University Tournament in Baltimore.

Students participate in both parliamentary debates and spoken word throughout the course of these tournaments. The team itself, however, is about way more than just arguing or public speaking.

“The debate team has made me realize how important it is to speak your mind and be passionate about current issues,” says Abbey Porambo, who won first place for her poetry during the CFA-Morgan State Tournament. “I believe that it is so important to use your words with purpose, which is something I never would have said four years ago before I joined the team.”

Porambo is the current president of the Speech and Debate Team and has been involved in the club since her freshman year. She is avid on helping her team better their public speaking skills.

“The team took second place overall, which hasn’t been done since 2013,” Porambo shares, highlighting the growth of their work.

“This team has provided me not only with many important academic skills but also with an amazing group of peers and advisors that have made my BU experience so much better,” shares Alisa Evans, who placed first in a parliamentary debate alongside Anna Scott. “This team is a family and we support and help each other in and outside of forensics.”

PACFE conference delivers for accounting majors

PACFE conference

In today’s technology friendly world, criminals find many creative ways to mask their identity — including our beloved, trusty smartphone. Scott Boehret, a senior accounting major, recently got the inside scoop on the different apps used for that purpose at the Pennsylvania Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (PACFE) conference.

“One of the most interesting sessions was about smartphones,” Boehret said. “I learned that there are many different apps that criminals use to mask their identities on the phone, secret texting apps, and more.”

Boehret said the speaker discussed how law enforcement uses cell phones to aid them in prosecution, as well as how criminals use them to aid in crime.

“There are apps that could change my voice to make me sound like a woman as well as making it look like I’m calling from Arizona or some other place. The speaker kept my attention very well.”

Boehret learned about this opportunity by an email he received about the conference. He said he was interested in going because Forensic accounting is a career path he is looking into.

“As an accounting major, I usually hear things from people like ‘You’ll always have a job’ or ‘You have so many options,’” Boehret said. “I usually take that with a grain of salt, because I’m still in school, and haven’t been exposed to all of the opportunities in accounting that exist.”

After going to the PACFE conference, according to Boehret, he understands a little more, because in forensic accounting, there are lots of opportunities that are available.

COE hosts college bound day

Junior Achievement Day

Hosted by the College of Education, the middle school students will attend three Junior Achievement lessons centering on personal identity, budgeting finances and career exploration. They will tour the campus, including visits to the Andruss Library, a residence hall room and classrooms, and eat lunch in Roongo’s Café.

BU education majors will gain teaching experience through the program, she added. Members of the BU chapter of the Association of Middle Level Education (BU-AMLE) are in charge of organizing instructional materials and training volunteer preservice teachers, who will instruct the eighth-graders. Rogowsky, adviser of BU-AMLE, and Kimberly Bolig, director of BU’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education Center, are coordinating the program.

BU is partnering with Junior Achievement and the Zeigler Family Foundation to present Junior Achievement Economics for Success, a middle school program that shows the value of a college education. Junior Achievement middle school programs are developed with a primary emphasis on entrepreneurship, financial literacy and work readiness, while providing a strong secondary emphasis on mathematics, reading and writing skills.

The Giving Tree Project

Bloomsburg University’s Center for Leadership and Engagement (CLE) invites the campus to participate in this year’s The Giving Tree service project. The Giving Tree is a great way to give back to the Bloomsburg community and spread joy by giving underprivileged children gifts for the holiday season.

More than 200 students from grade schools in the local community are given a chance to receive gifts they might not receive otherwise.

To participate, pick up an ornament with a child’s name on it Friday, Nov. 18, from 10 to 2 p.m. in the Kehr Union Building in the Main Lobby or in the Students Service Center. Each ornament will have a list of the child’s clothing and shoe sizes and a wish list. Only 17 ornaments remain, so don’t miss out on an opportunity to make a child’s holiday season better!

Gospel Choir presents Fall Gospel Fest

Gospel Choir

Bloomsburg University's Gospel Choir invites you to join them for their annual Fall Gospel Fest on Friday, Nov. 18, at 6 p.m. in Gross Auditorium, Carver Hall.

Under the leadership of director, Marwin Reeves, students will perform a variety of gospel music selections. This event is free and open to the public. Gospel Choir meetings and rehearsals are held weekly on Thursday evenings and new student members are always welcome.

For additional information on becoming a part of this student organization, please contact Khadijah Williams, Gospel Choir president at kw93450@huskies.bloomu.edu.

Women's Rugby wins MARC championship

Women's Rugby

The Bloomsburg University Women’s Rugby team has advanced to the National DII Rugby Tournament by winning the Mid-Atlantic Rugby Conference Championship for the second year in a row.

BU finished the regular season 6-0 and continued their success in the MARC playoffs last weekend defeating St. Joseph’s University and Kutztown University to improve their record to 8-0.

After winning the MARC Championship, BU automatically advances to the national tournament. BU’s undefeated season was rewarded by being one of four teams granted a bye week, allowing the teams to advance straight to the round of 16, rather than playing in the round of 32 to advance further.

The Huskies head to Kutztown University on Nov. 19 to play the winner of the Coast Guard and Maine-Orono match. If successful, the Huskies will continue their race to nationals down in Greenville, South Carolina.

Can’t be at your best when hungry

Bloomsburg University’s Department of Mass Communications is helping to bring awareness to the Hungry Huskies Initiative with a live concert by local band Send Request on Thursday, Nov. 17, in McCormick Center 1303.

Guests can donate with cash or canned goods upon entrance to the concert, which starts at 5 p.m. In addition to the live music, guests will be able to enjoy pizza and beverages.

Hungry Huskies is an on- and off-campus initiative partnering with the community that was launched this past summer to help reduce student hunger.

Contact Richard Ganahl, professor of mass communications, at rganahl@bloomu.edu for more information.

International Education Week

International Education Week is coming to campus, featuring a number of events that will cultivate the minds of students on international competency. The week-long celebration is sponsored by the Office of Global and Multicultural Education and runs from Nov. 14 to 18 at several locations offering a variety of activities.

  • Monday, Nov. 14, 5 to 6 p.m. in 004 SSC — Workshop: “How to Effectively Market your International Experience to Employers,” offered by the CPDCE Center and includes refreshments.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 15, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Centennial 218 — Film Screening: “Crossing Borders,” designed to heighten students’ awareness of hidden preconceptions, support development of intercultural empathy and critical thinking skills, and initiating dialogue between students of different cultures. Discussion will follow with Professor Yahya Laayouni.
  • Wednesday, Nov. 16, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in 236 SSC — “Study Abroad Open House,” discover, explore, experience with the Office of Global and Multicultural Education and includes refreshments.
  • Thursday, Nov. 17, 6 to 8 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose 345B — “Tea & Coffee Traditions from Around the World," International student presentations with teas, coffees and desserts.
  • Friday, Nov. 18, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in CEH Dance Studio — “International Folk Dance,” join in and learn folk dance from students; no partners are needed.

Love march kicks off No Hate Week

No Hate Week

Bloomsburg University students and local residents kicked off the second annual No Hate Week with a Love March Sunday, Nov. 13. According to Marcei Woods, coordinator of Cultural Affairs and Student Support Services, No Hate Week brings the university and town together to promote mutual understanding and respect.

The Love March featured remarks from one student and one local resident at each stop along the route — Carver Hall, the downtown fountain and the campus fountain at the Academic Quad. Student speakers are Gary Phillips, Vincent Phan and Jimmy Muwombi; community speakers are Dwayne Heisler, Elizabeth Dowd and Steve Engelhardt.

No Hate Week Events

  • “Listening to Students” with speaker Payton Head, policy and engagement fellow at the National Campus Leadership Council, Monday, Nov. 14, at 6 p.m. in Kehr Union, multipurpose A and B.
  • “What’s Love Got to Do with It?” Tuesday, Nov. 15, at 7 p.m. in Kehr Union, Multicultural Center
  • “Shades of the Rainbow” with speaker Malik Muhammad, coordinator of sexual and gender diversity, and BU students, Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 7 p.m. in Kehr Union, multipurpose A
  • Love celebration featuring free food, music and prizes, Thursday, Nov. 17, at 7 p.m., in Kehr Union, multipurpose A.

National Transgender Awareness Month

Trans Awareness Month

Joining the national celebration of National Transgender Awareness Month, Bloomsburg University has several events planned such as, Trans 101, Trans Speak Out, or “From This Day Forward” Movie Screening.

  • Trans 101 will be on Tuesday, Nov. 1 in the Kehr Multipurpose Room A, at 7 p.m. Trans 101 is a one hour presentation that will briefly explain gender, sex, and sexuality. It will focus on what it means to be transgender and how to support Trans identified people.
  • Join members at Trans Speak out as they share their coming out stories and answer questions you may have about the community on Thursday, Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. in Centennial 218. Dinner will be provided.
  • On Thursday, Nov. 17 outside Carver Hall students will take a stand and march to show their support in sending sexual and gender based violence at 8:00 p.m. This is a chance to reclaim the night and end all forms of sexual misconduct!
  • Trans Day of Remembrance Memorial Service and Candle Light Vigil will be Friday, Nov. 18 at the Multicultural Center at 7 p.m. This event is to honor and celebrate the lives of all of those lost ones within the Transgender community due to hate and violence. Join us as we commemorate those lost. Catered denier will be provided.
  • On Wednesday, Nov. 30 in Centennial 218 at 7:30 p.m. students will watch “From this Day Forward” a movie portrayal of an American family coping with one of the most intimate transitions. Join us as we watch and host a discussion following.

Be sure to stop by our table to get a Ginger bread cookie and a ribbon. Show your support for the Trans community by stopping by our table to learn a thing or two. Every Tuesday of November! Brought to you by the LGBTQ Resource Center and The Women’s Resource Center.

Top economists to speak in lecture series

Roland J.M. Bénabou

Two renowned economists from Princeton University will come to Bloomsburg University to participate in the Department of Economics’ 2016-17 lecture series. These lectures are free and open to the public.

On Monday, Nov. 14, Roland J.M. Bénabou will present “Forbidden Fruits: The Political Economy of Science, Religion and Growth” at 2 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Bénabou’s research and teaching cover a wide range of macro and micro issues with 44 articles published in professional journals including The American Economic Review, National Bureau of Economic Research Macroeconomics Annual and Review of Economic Studies, as well as invitations to lecture worldwide in locations such as France, Hungary and Italy.

Bénabou holds a joint position in the Princeton’s Department of Economics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He received his doctorate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a fellow of the Economic Society, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, senior fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and associate at the Institute for Research on Poverty.

Alan B. Krueger, professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton, will present “The Rise of Alternative Work Arrangements in the U.S.” on Tuesday, April 25, 2017, at 2 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Krueger has published 85 articles, earned numerous economic awards and held positions including assistant secretary for economic policy and chief economist to the U.S. Department of the Treasury. He is known for being an “empiricist” with a diverse range of knowledge and research in economics.

Emergency exercise, siren testing

Emergency Notification System

Components of Bloomsburg University’s emergency notification system, including campus sirens, will be tested on Sunday, Nov. 13, between 8 a.m. and noon as part of on-campus training.

BU Police officers and law enforcement partners from the State Police and area municipal departments, including Bloomsburg Town Police, will participate in training with members of the campus community. The activity is a simulation of an actual emergency situation and is designed to maintain a high level of emergency preparedness to benefit both the university and local residents.

All BU students and registered faculty and staff will receive a test text message related to the Sunday, Nov. 13, emergency drill. The notification system may contact members of the campus community via text, email, voice mail and sirens installed on upper and lower campus when an emergency situation develops. BU tests the emergency notification system once each semester.

Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence

PASSHE

Bloomsburg University deans, department chairs, faculty and staff are invited to nominate an outstanding senior for the annual Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence, sponsored by Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) Foundation. Ali-Zaidi, a charter member of the State System’s Board of Governors, established the award to inspire and honor System students who excel in the pursuit of knowledge. The 2017 statewide award recipient will receive a medallion and $1,000.

You may nominate a senior no later than 4 p.m., Friday, Nov. 11. The letters should provide specific details that offer insight into the nominee’s outstanding qualities including, but not limited to, information on the student’s research and co-curricular/creative activities outside of the classroom

Nominations will be evaluated on
  • The quality of the nominee’s essay
  • Outstanding performance in the academic major and other areas of study
  • Current GPA, awards, honors projects, faculty-student research, publications, etc.
  • Evidence of distinctive scholarship and/or creative projects with impact on the community, beyond the classroom
  • Participation in co-curricular and/or creative activities during undergraduate years
  • Involvement in student or community organizations and leadership positions held

President David L. Soltz will select one nominee as the university’s representative and write a nomination letter to the PASSHE selection committee. To nominate an outstanding senior, send (e-mail, mail or hand deliver) the completed nomination packet to Ali-Zaidi Award Committee, Attention: Jessica Beaver, Office of Planning and Assessment, 2203 McCormick Center, jbeaver@bloomu.edu.

BU again named ‘military friendly’

Military Friendly School

Once again, Bloomsburg University has earned the title of Military Friendly School from Victory Media, publisher of GI Jobs magazine — the first as a Silver Level Award.

As a Military Friendly School silver level, BU is ranked in the top 10 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country working to embrace military service members, veterans and spouses as students ensuring their success on campus.

According to Bob Heckrote, academic adviser for military and undeclared students, 437 military students attend BU. “Military students” are defined as current and former military personnel, their spouses and dependents, and ROTC cadets.

To meet the needs of military students, BU provides preferred class scheduling and has established a military students lounge. The BU Student Veterans Association offers opportunities for social and educational activities and is involved in fundraisers to benefit organizations such as The Wounded Warrior Foundation and the American Red Cross.

Military Students Highlights

FOCUS returns for campus service

Bethel Deliverance International

Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Nov. 13, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and Homecoming blessings. Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods at 570-389-4091 for details.

‘ELF The Musical’ brings holiday spirit to campus

The holidays are coming early to Bloomsburg University’s Celebrity Artist Series with the national Broadway tour of “ELF The Musical” on Friday, Nov. 11, at 7:30 p.m. in Haas Center for Performing Arts, Mitrani Hall.

“ELF The Musical,” adapted from the 2003 film, is the tale of Buddy, an orphan who accidently crawls into Santa’s bag and is transported back to the North Pole. Unaware that he is human, Buddy’s enormous size and poor toy-making abilities cause him to face the truth. Buddy then embarks on a journey to New York City to find his birth father, his true identity and help all of New York City remember the true meaning of Christmas.

“ELF The Musical” features songs by Tony Award nominees Matthew Skalr and Chad Beguelin (“The Wedding Singer”) with a book by Tony Award winners Thomas Meehan (“Annie,” “The Producers” and “Hairspray”) and Bob Martin (“The Drowsy Chaperone”).

Discussing ethics and warfare

Romeo Wright

Romeo Wright, a retired Army officer with more than 21 years of service, will present on the topic of Ethics and Warfare, specifically, on the difficult decisions that military members face during war and conflict on Wednesday, Nov. 9, from 3 to 4 p.m. at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s McCormick’s Center for Human Services room 1303.

While the average individual will never have to make these decisions in war, they will be faced with many ethical dilemmas throughout their careers and lives. Mr. Wright will discuss the decision making process for these ethical dilemmas.

Wright’s presentation is a ZIPD approved event and the point is awarded to Career and Professional Development, Global and Cultural Engagement, and Leadership Development. Sponsors for this event include The Office of Military and Veterans Resources, BUSVA, Center for Professional Development and Career Enhancement, and the College of Business.

Every vote counts!

Election Day

Polls will be open Tuesday, Nov. 8, from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for voters to cast ballots in the presidential race, including students who live on campus and are registered to vote at Bloomsburg University.

According to Matt Repasky, Columbia County’s chief registrar, 2,271 people are registered to vote on campus at Kehr Union, Multipurpose A and B. NextGen Climate will provide free food, music and games to celebrate Election Day Tuesday on the Lycoming Hall lawn beginning with breakfast and continuing throughout the day. All are welcome.

A weeklong honor of military

Veterans Day will be recognized with a full week of activities starting Monday, Nov. 7, with yellow ribbons on the Academic Quad, and extending to Friday, Nov. 11, with the Veterans Suicide Prevention Walk. According to Bob Heckrote, academic adviser for military and undeclared students, 437 military students attend BU. “Military students” are defined as current and former military personnel, their spouses and dependents, and participants in Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, known as ROTC.

  • The Nov. 7 ribbon display will be a visual representation of the number of students, faculty and staff who served or are serving in the military.
  • Also planned for Monday, Nov. 7, is a military information panel at 3 p.m. in McCormick Center, room 1303, with Brigadier Gen. Tony Carrelli, Pennsylvania adjutant general, and other armed forces representatives.
  • Poster-sized photographs from the Vietnam War will be displayed Tuesday, Nov. 8, in the lobbies of the Warren Student Services Center and Kehr Union.
  • Military vehicles and gear will be featured in a daylong “Touch a Truck” display Thursday, Nov. 10, near the Academic Quad.
  • Events on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, will begin with a free breakfast for military students, faculty, staff and supporters followed by the Veterans Suicide Prevention Walk at the Academic Quad.

$2 million gift establishes Air Force scholarship

Charles Picek

The Bloomsburg University Foundation recently received a gift to establish the Edwards Scholarship Award, which will benefit students at Bloomsburg University with a family member who is a current or previous member of the United States Air Force.

The $2 million gift, received from the estate of Charles Picek, was donated to endow the scholarship fund in honor of his mother-in-law and father-in-law, Bloomsburg alumni Katharine Bierman Edwards, Class of 1915, and Lt. Gen. Idwal Edwards, Class of 1914.

Edwards was a general and a director of personnel for the Air Force. As a senior personnel officer, with extensive experience in the area of military race relations, he was directed by his commanding officer to develop a plan that eventually led to the end of segregation in the Air Force.

There are currently 437 military students attending BU. “Military students” are defined as current and former military personnel, their spouses and dependents, and ROTC cadets.

Vet Suicide Awareness Walk

BUSVA Walk

Delta Kappa Epsilon and Bloomsburg University Student Veterans Association (BUSVA) are teaming up once again for the Veterans Suicide Awareness Walk. All proceeds will be donated to the National Alliance to End Veterans Suicide, which helps tp prevent and end veteran suicide through research, resource provision, and community collaboration.

According to Zachary Romano, Delta Kappa Epsilon philanthropy chair, last year they raised $3,251. This year they hope to surpass their goal of $3,500 and get more people to show support and walk at 10 a.m., Friday, Nov. 11, around the quad.

With every $20 donated BUSVA, ROTC, and Delta Kappa Epsilon will walk around the outside of the quad.

By going to gofundme.com/endvetsuicide you can help by donating and spreading the word.

Native American performers come to campus

The Piscataway Singers and Dancers and Mark Tayac, Native American performers, will preform on Thursday, Nov. 10, at 5 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Multicultural Center.

At the time of Columbus, as many as 10 million Native Americans lived in North America. A succession of Algonquian people ultimately coalesced into the Piscataway Nation of the Chesapeake and Tidewater regions of Maryland. The Piscataway were the first Native Americans to encounter Captain John Smith along the banks of the Potomac River in 1608. Today, Mark Tayac and the Piscataway Nation Singers and Dancers carry on the longstanding traditions, culture and heritage of their indigenous ancestors.

Tayac travels with the Piscataway Nation Singers and Dancers presenting a colorful, educational and entertaining pow-wow-style campus event, featuring American Indian dance, drums, and song. In addition to their many college campus appearances, the Piscataway Nation Singers and Dancers are frequent contributors to television specials on the History Channel and Discovery Channel. They also appear regularly at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D.C., national pow-wows, and major festivals.

The Piscataway Singers and Dancers performance is sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

‘ELF The Musical’ brings holiday spirit to campus

The holidays are coming early to Bloomsburg University’s Celebrity Artist Series with the national Broadway tour of “ELF The Musical” on Friday, Nov. 11, at 7:30 p.m. in Haas Center for Performing Arts, Mitrani Hall.

“ELF The Musical,” adapted from the 2003 film, is the tale of Buddy, an orphan who accidently crawls into Santa’s bag and is transported back to the North Pole. Unaware that he is human, Buddy’s enormous size and poor toy-making abilities cause him to face the truth. Buddy then embarks on a journey to New York City to find his birth father, his true identity and help all of New York City remember the true meaning of Christmas.

“ELF The Musical” features songs by Tony Award nominees Matthew Skalr and Chad Beguelin (“The Wedding Singer”) with a book by Tony Award winners Thomas Meehan (“Annie,” “The Producers” and “Hairspray”) and Bob Martin (“The Drowsy Chaperone”).

A message from President Soltz

On our Bloomsburg University campus and across the nation, the recent election season brought out a level of politically energized student activism I haven’t seen since I was an undergraduate in the 1960s. The current level of civic engagement and discourse nationwide reaffirms the role of higher education in encouraging and facilitating student dialogue related to gender identity, human rights, citizenship, identity, social justice, race, sexual orientation and religion.

David L. Soltz

It also paints the backdrop for the second annual No Hate Week, Nov. 13 to 17, cosponsored by a wide range of Bloomsburg University organizations and the Coalition for Social Equity, a university/town partnership. As we begin this observance with a Love March on Sunday, I encourage each of you to reflect on the purpose and role of higher education, which I believe is not only about knowledge, exploration and critical thinking, but also about how you use what you have learned as the foundation of how you think, interact and engage.

At Bloomsburg University, you are learning to synthesize and process information in order to think deeply, critically and reflectively. I encourage you to learn as much as you can from the real-time canvas we are experiencing. Reflect on the historical events of this year. Question yourself as much as you question others. Ask yourself, “Who am I becoming in words and deeds?” This question is of particular relevance today, given the current national climate and state of division and discourse.

Through your words and actions, you have a tremendous opportunity to make a difference and positively influence not only your fellow students but also those of other generations, from different cultures and religions and from all walks of life. Speak from a position of knowledge, not just emotion, and listen, truly listen, to the words of others so you may understand and, in so doing, positively contribute to society and social justice.

I recognize that many of you, along with your friends and your family, may be experiencing a range of emotions this week. I assure you that Bloomsburg University values every member of our community and works every day to provide an inclusive and safe environment with respect for all. If indeed you would like to talk with specific resources as an individual or with a group, please reach out to trusted offices on campus, including the following:

  • Dean of Students Office 570-389-4734
  • Center for Diversity and Inclusion 570-389-4734
  • Cultural Affairs and Student Support 570-389-4091
  • International Student Services 570-389-4831
  • LGBTQA Resource Center 570-389-2819
  • Military and Veterans Resources 570-389-3856
  • Multicultural Center 570-389-4510
  • Women’s Resource Center 570-389-5283
  • Students with Disabilities Center 570-389-4491

In the weeks ahead, you may be involved in uncomfortable conversations that challenge your beliefs. As you participate in these vigorous discussions, I encourage you to be respectful of those whose opinions differ from yours and remember that Bloomsburg’s administration, faculty and staff are committed to providing support, guidance and a safe environment where ideas can be exchanged in a thoughtful manner.

  David L. Soltz, president

Emergency exercise, siren testing on Sunday

Emergency Notification System

Components of Bloomsburg University’s emergency notification system, including campus sirens, will be tested on Sunday, Nov. 13, between 8 a.m. and noon as part of on-campus training.

BU Police officers and law enforcement partners from the State Police and area municipal departments, including Bloomsburg Town Police, will participate in training with members of the campus community. The activity is a simulation of an actual emergency situation and is designed to maintain a high level of emergency preparedness to benefit both the university and local residents.

All BU students and registered faculty and staff will receive a test text message related to the Sunday, Nov. 13, emergency drill. The notification system may contact members of the campus community via text, email, voice mail and sirens installed on upper and lower campus when an emergency situation develops. BU tests the emergency notification system once each semester.

FOCUS returns for campus service

Bethel Deliverance International

Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Nov. 13, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and Homecoming blessings. Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods at 570-389-4091 for details.

International Education Week

International Education Week is coming to campus, featuring a number of events that will cultivate the minds of students on international competency. The week-long celebration is sponsored by the Office of Global and Multicultural Education and runs from Nov. 14 to 18 at several locations offering a variety of activities.

  • Monday, Nov. 14, 5 to 6 p.m. in 004 SSC — Workshop: “How to Effectively Market your International Experience to Employers”, offered by the CPDCE Center and includes refreshments.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 15, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Centennial 218 — Film Screening: “Crossing Borders”, designed to heighten students’ awareness of hidden preconceptions, support development of intercultural empathy and critical thinking skills, and initiating dialogue between students of different cultures. Discussion will follow with Professor Yahya Laayouni.
  • Wednesday, Nov. 16, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in 236 SSC — “Study Abroad Open House”, discover, explore, experience with the Office of Global and Multicultural Education and includes refreshments.
  • Thursday, Nov. 17, 6 to 8 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose 345B — “Tea & Coffee Traditions from Around the World”, International student presentations with teas, coffees and desserts.
  • Friday, Nov. 18, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in CEH Dance Studio — “International Folk Dance”, join in and learn folk dance from students; no partners are needed.

National Transgender Awareness Month

Trans Awareness Month

Joining the national celebration of National Transgender Awareness Month, Bloomsburg University has several events planned such as, Trans 101, Trans Speak Out, or “From This Day Forward” Movie Screening.

  • Trans 101 will be on Tuesday, Nov. 1 in the Kehr Multipurpose Room A, at 7 p.m. Trans 101 is a one hour presentation that will briefly explain gender, sex, and sexuality. It will focus on what it means to be transgender and how to support Trans identified people.
  • Join members at Trans Speak out as they share their coming out stories and answer questions you may have about the community on Thursday, Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. in Centennial 218. Dinner will be provided.
  • On Thursday, Nov. 17 outside Carver Hall students will take a stand and march to show their support in sending sexual and gender based violence at 8:00 p.m. This is a chance to reclaim the night and end all forms of sexual misconduct!
  • Trans Day of Remembrance Memorial Service and Candle Light Vigil will be Friday, Nov. 18 at the Multicultural Center at 7 p.m. This event is to honor and celebrate the lives of all of those lost ones within the Transgender community due to hate and violence. Join us as we commemorate those lost. Catered denier will be provided.
  • On Wednesday, Nov. 30 in Centennial 218 at 7:30 p.m. students will watch “From this Day Forward” a movie portrayal of an American family coping with one of the most intimate transitions. Join us as we watch and host a discussion following.

Be sure to stop by our table to get a Ginger bread cookie and a ribbon. Show your support for the Trans community by stopping by our table to learn a thing or two. Every Tuesday of November! Brought to you by the LGBTQ Resource Center and The Women’s Resource Center.

Powder-puff raises more than $1,400 for March of Dimes

Powder Puff Fundraiser

Bloomsburg University’s Sigma Sigma Sigma recently raised more than $1,400 for the March of Dimes via its second annual Powder-Puff Football Tournament, held at Redman Stadium’s Danny Hale Field.

All proceeds benefitted the foundation, which works to improve general health of mothers and children.

Stacey Nocero, vice president of Tri Sigma, came up with the powder-puff football idea as a way to try something new and different for a fundraiser. Nocero was inspired by her high school, which hosts a powder-puff game every year. The game brings together every grade level and even the teachers participate as coaches, she said.

This year’s Tri Sigma Powder-puff tournament was a success. Ten sororities participated and helped raise more than twice the amount raised last year, according to Nocero.

$2 million gift establishes Air Force scholarship

Charles Picek

The Bloomsburg University Foundation recently received a gift to establish the Edwards Scholarship Award, which will benefit students at Bloomsburg University with a family member who is a current or previous member of the United States Air Force.

The $2 million gift, received from the estate of Charles Picek, was donated to endow the scholarship fund in honor of his mother-in-law and father-in-law, Bloomsburg alumni Katharine Bierman Edwards, Class of 1915, and Lt. Gen. Idwal Edwards, Class of 1914.

Edwards was a general and a director of personnel for the Air Force. As a senior personnel officer, with extensive experience in the area of military race relations, he was directed by his commanding officer to develop a plan that eventually led to the end of segregation in the Air Force.

There are currently 437 military students attending BU. “Military students” are defined as current and former military personnel, their spouses and dependents, and ROTC cadets.

Soil judging team wins bid to nationals

Soil Judging Team

A team of students from Bloomsburg University recently won the Northeast Regional Collegiate Soil Judging Contest hosted by Pennsylvania State University, qualifying to compete in the National Soil Judging Contest at Northern Illinois University in the spring.

BU entered two teams, led by Team A that finished first overall with 3,271 points and fifth in group judging with 570 points. Only the top four teams from the Northeast region qualify for nationals, so joining BU will be the University of Maryland, University of Rhode Island, and Delaware Valley College.

Four BU students also placed individually in the top 10 out of 84 competitors. Eric Franz placed second place with 918 points, Joshua Prezkop placed seventh with 892 points, Daniel Steinhauser tied for eighth with 891 points, and Ryan Sullivan placed tenth with 890 points.

“In the EGGS department soils lab, we were trained on the basics of how to determine the texture of the soil by hand and also the methods soil scientists use to describe the color,” said Steinhauser, describing some of the training prior to competition day.

Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence

PASSHE

Bloomsburg Universit deans, department chairs, faculty and staff are invited to nominate an outstanding senior for the annual Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence, sponsored by Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) Foundation. Ali-Zaidi, a charter member of the State System’s Board of Governors, established the award to inspire and honor System students who excel in the pursuit of knowledge. The 2017 statewide award recipient will receive a medallion and $1,000.

You may nominate a senior no later than 4 p.m., Friday, Nov. 11. The letters should provide specific details that offer insight into the nominee’s outstanding qualities including, but not limited to, information on the student’s research and co-curricular/creative activities outside of the classroom

Nominations will be evaluated on
  • The quality of the nominee’s essay
  • Outstanding performance in the academic major and other areas of study
  • Current GPA, awards, honors projects, faculty-student research, publications, etc.
  • Evidence of distinctive scholarship and/or creative projects with impact on the community, beyond the classroom
  • Participation in co-curricular and/or creative activities during undergraduate years
  • Involvement in student or community organizations and leadership positions held

President David L. Soltz will select one nominee as the university’s representative and write a nomination letter to the PASSHE selection committee. To nominate an outstanding senior, send (e-mail, mail or hand deliver) the completed nomination packet to Ali-Zaidi Award Committee, Attention: Jessica Beaver, Office of Planning and Assessment, 2203 McCormick Center, jbeaver@bloomu.edu.

BU ranks among "Best Bang for the Buck"

Academic Quad

Bloomsburg University was recently named among the top of Washington Monthly’s list for Best Bang for the Buck in the Northeast.

BU ranked at 125 out of 386 colleges and universities on the list, and was the second highest PASSHE school. Washington Monthly ranked their list based on best overall graduation rate, Pell Grant performance, First-generation student performance, earnings performance, and net price in the Northeast schools. Making it the best education for the best price.

BU ranked ahead of Millersville, Shippensburg, East Stroudsburg and Slippery Rock. BU was also listed higher than Temple University, Philadelphia University, Johns Hopkins University, Drexel University, and University of Connecticut. The complete list of rankings are available on Washington Monthly.

Top economists to speak in lecture series

Roland J.M. Bénabou

Two renowned economists from Princeton University will come to Bloomsburg University to participate in the Department of Economics’ 2016-17 lecture series. These lectures are free and open to the public.

On Monday, Nov. 14, Roland J.M. Bénabou will present “Forbidden Fruits: The Political Economy of Science, Religion and Growth” at 2 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Bénabou’s research and teaching cover a wide range of macro and micro issues with 44 articles published in professional journals including The American Economic Review, National Bureau of Economic Research Macroeconomics Annual and Review of Economic Studies, as well as invitations to lecture worldwide in locations such as France, Hungary and Italy.

Bénabou holds a joint position in the Princeton’s Department of Economics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He received his doctorate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a fellow of the Economic Society, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, senior fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and associate at the Institute for Research on Poverty.

Alan B. Krueger, professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton, will present “The Rise of Alternative Work Arrangements in the U.S.” on Tuesday, April 25, 2017, at 2 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Krueger has published 85 articles, earned numerous economic awards and held positions including assistant secretary for economic policy and chief economist to the U.S. Department of the Treasury. He is known for being an “empiricist” with a diverse range of knowledge and research in economics.

A new name for the College of Business

Zeigler College of Business

Today, Bloomsburg University’s College of Business became the Terry and JoAnn Zeigler College of Business. Terry Zeigler ’76, president and CEO of Datacap Systems Inc., Chalfont; his wife, JoAnn Schultz Zeigler ’77; and Zeigler Family Foundation collectively contributed the largest philanthropic gift to the Bloomsburg University Foundation to name the university's College of Business, which is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

The combination of an outright $5 million gift, endowed to provide immediate support, and a deferred gift from Zeigler Family Foundation, to strengthen the College of Business, is one of the largest gifts from an individual donor in the history of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education.

“This is a landmark event in the history of both Bloomsburg University and the College of Business,” said BU President David Soltz. “Terry and JoAnn’s continued support of our university and our students is truly inspirational. In naming the Zeigler College of Business, their legacy of philanthropy will be recognized forever.”

Erik Evans, BU’s vice president of University Advancement, said the Zeiglers’ latest gift demonstrates their continuing investment in improving opportunities for BU students, both as volunteers and donors.

“Terry and JoAnn have an unmistakable passion for continuing the success of the College of Business at Bloomsburg University,” Evans said. “They have played a key role from the start in our It’s Personal campaign. This gift exemplifies their commitment to student preparation and their willingness to share the winning business strategies that led to their success.”

MBA group summits New England's highest peak

Mt. Washington Hike

A core objective of Bloomsburg University’s Master of Business Administration (MBA) program is developing leadership skills, particularly for dynamic, environments .such as the business boardroom but for now — Mt. Washington, the highest peak in New England.

The current cohort of MBA students kicked off the fall semester with a field experience to the 18th highest point in the country, hiking to the 6,288-foot summit of Mt. Washington as part of their Leadership on the Edge course.

“Even though you may be with a team of people whom you don’t know very well, you still need to have trust in each other,” said Rebecca Ward, among the MBA students to summit the peak. “We left as a team of strangers and came back a team of friends.”

Leadership on the Edge is designed to provide insight and reinforce leadership theories that are taught in the classroom, by asking students to practice those theories in an unfamiliar and unpredictable wilderness environment. Students practice management, leadership and coping skills. Leaders who are prepared and willing to make rapid adjustments in the way they deal with potentially threatening, unfamiliar situations and convincing others to follow.

“By placing a team of students in a challenging and unfamiliar environment where teamwork, decision-making, and effective leadership are crucial for success,” Ward said. “This experience reinforces leadership theories that we are taught in class.”

English class enjoys Othello in 16th century backdrop

Shakespeare Class

For many English majors, it doesn’t get much better than Shakespeare. Now to see his works performed on stage in 16th century Renaissance England … that’s a dream.

And that’s exactly what happened for students this fall taking English 463 — taught by Christina Francis, associate professor of English — who recently traveled to Baltimore for a production of Shakespeare’s Othello by the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company (CSC).

“I really enjoyed the fact that it is so alive, which is so very different from reading,” said Emily Sweeney, an English education major. “You get so much more out of Shakespeare as soon as it jumps off of the page, from emotion to motion to simple staging.”

The main actors of the production spent some time after the performance answering questions about their roles and the challenges of delivering Shakespearean lines.

“It was interesting to see that the actors saw the characters in one way, and they even said that they did specific things because that’s how Shakespeare wrote it,” Sweeney said. “… which is very interesting to me because, as an English education major, we are taught to look at no interpretation as wrong and that there are an infinite number of ways to look at literature. It was apparently clear that the actors disagreed with that.”

Ashley Muchler, an English education major, agreed.

“I learned people in theatre view Shakespeare in a very different way than people who deal more so with literature do,” said Muchler, adding seeing Shakespeare performed will always be an incredible supplement to studying his works.

ROTC cadets participate in 9/11 memorial service

Shanksville Memorial Service

Elizabeth Inns was only a kid when the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks occurred and can barely remember anything, but “it felt like she was relieving the moment” when she anda few fellow Army ROTC cadets participated in the recent 9/11 Memorial Service in Shanksville.

“My father was in the military and motivated me to join the Army,” said Inns, a sophomore marketing major. “This exercise symbolized how hard every volunteer was working that day.”

An estimated 1,000 people attended the Shanksville memorial service this fall held in honor of the 40 passengers and crew members of the plane that crashed about 60 miles southeast of Pittsburgh — the final of four terrorist hijackings that day.

Prior to the memorial service, the cadets visited the local fire department first to respond to Flight 93, where they met up with 30 civilians and carried the American flag to the memorial service site. After being sprayed down with a water hose, each cadet participated in several exercises to honor every step the first-responding firemen at the World Trade Center climbed to reach the 78th floor.

“Yes, I was very tired but as I was completing the exercises,” Inns said. “I knew the pain I was experiencing couldn’t compare to the heroes of the Shanksville tragedy. This event made me realize my inner patriotism.”

A new name for the College of Business

Zeigler College of Business

Today, Bloomsburg University’s College of Business became the Terry and JoAnn Zeigler College of Business. Terry Zeigler ’76, president and CEO of Datacap Systems Inc., Chalfont; his wife, JoAnn Schultz Zeigler ’77; and Zeigler Family Foundation collectively contributed the largest philanthropic gift to the Bloomsburg University Foundation to name the university's College of Business, which is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

The combination of an outright $5 million gift, endowed to provide immediate support, and a deferred gift from Zeigler Family Foundation, to strengthen the College of Business, is one of the largest gifts from an individual donor in the history of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education.

“This is a landmark event in the history of both Bloomsburg University and the College of Business,” said BU President David Soltz. “Terry and JoAnn’s continued support of our university and our students is truly inspirational. In naming the Zeigler College of Business, their legacy of philanthropy will be recognized forever.”

Erik Evans, BU’s vice president of University Advancement, said the Zeiglers’ latest gift demonstrates their continuing investment in improving opportunities for BU students, both as volunteers and donors.

“Terry and JoAnn have an unmistakable passion for continuing the success of the College of Business at Bloomsburg University,” Evans said. “They have played a key role from the start in our It’s Personal campaign. This gift exemplifies their commitment to student preparation and their willingness to share the winning business strategies that led to their success.”

MBA group summits New England's highest peak

Mt. Washington Hike

A core objective of Bloomsburg University’s Master of Business Administration (MBA) program is developing leadership skills, particularly for dynamic, environments .such as the business boardroom but for now — Mt. Washington, the highest peak in New England.

The current cohort of MBA students kicked off the fall semester with a field experience to the 18th highest point in the country, hiking to the 6,288-foot summit of Mt. Washington as part of their Leadership on the Edge course.

“Even though you may be with a team of people whom you don’t know very well, you still need to have trust in each other,” said Rebecca Ward, among the MBA students to summit the peak. “We left as a team of strangers and came back a team of friends.”

Leadership on the Edge is designed to provide insight and reinforce leadership theories that are taught in the classroom, by asking students to practice those theories in an unfamiliar and unpredictable wilderness environment. Students practice management, leadership and coping skills. Leaders who are prepared and willing to make rapid adjustments in the way they deal with potentially threatening, unfamiliar situations and convincing others to follow.

“By placing a team of students in a challenging and unfamiliar environment where teamwork, decision-making, and effective leadership are crucial for success,” Ward said. “This experience reinforces leadership theories that we are taught in class.”

English class enjoys Othello in 16th century backdrop

Shakespeare Class

For many English majors, it doesn’t get much better than Shakespeare. Now to see his works performed on stage in 16th century Renaissance England … that’s a dream.

And that’s exactly what happened for students this fall taking English 463 — taught by Christina Francis, associate professor of English — who recently traveled to Baltimore for a production of Shakespeare’s Othello by the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company (CSC).

“I really enjoyed the fact that it is so alive, which is so very different from reading,” said Emily Sweeney, an English education major. “You get so much more out of Shakespeare as soon as it jumps off of the page, from emotion to motion to simple staging.”

The main actors of the production spent some time after the performance answering questions about their roles and the challenges of delivering Shakespearean lines.

“It was interesting to see that the actors saw the characters in one way, and they even said that they did specific things because that’s how Shakespeare wrote it,” Sweeney said. “… which is very interesting to me because, as an English education major, we are taught to look at no interpretation as wrong and that there are an infinite number of ways to look at literature. It was apparently clear that the actors disagreed with that.”

Ashley Muchler, an English education major, agreed.

“I learned people in theatre view Shakespeare in a very different way than people who deal more so with literature do,” said Muchler, adding seeing Shakespeare performed will always be an incredible supplement to studying his works.

PACFE conference delivers for accounting majors

PACFE conference

In today’s technology friendly world, criminals find many creative ways to mask their identity — including our beloved, trusty smartphone. Scott Boehret, a senior accounting major, recently got the inside scoop on the different apps used for that purpose at the Pennsylvania Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (PACFE) conference.

“One of the most interesting sessions was about smartphones,” Boehret said. “I learned that there are many different apps that criminals use to mask their identities on the phone, secret texting apps, and more.”

Boehret said the speaker discussed how law enforcement uses cell phones to aid them in prosecution, as well as how criminals use them to aid in crime.

“There are apps that could change my voice to make me sound like a woman as well as making it look like I’m calling from Arizona or some other place. The speaker kept my attention very well.”

Boehret learned about this opportunity by an email he received about the conference. He said he was interested in going because Forensic accounting is a career path he is looking into.

“As an accounting major, I usually hear things from people like ‘You’ll always have a job’ or ‘You have so many options,’” Boehret said. “I usually take that with a grain of salt, because I’m still in school, and haven’t been exposed to all of the opportunities in accounting that exist.”

After going to the PACFE conference, according to Boehret, he understands a little more, because in forensic accounting, there are lots of opportunities that are available.

Art exhibit helps open regional LGBTQA Conference

LGBQT Art Exhibit

This group exhibition of 13 artists from across the United States, will open in support of the ninth annual Mid Atlantic LGBTQA Conference. The show opens Nov. 4 and runs to Dec. 5 in the Greenly Gallery, 150 E. Main St, Bloomsburg. There will be an opening reception on Friday, Nov 4, from 6 to 8 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

The show explores the topic of (de)construction of complex personal identities within the diverse LGBTQA community. It investigates gender, personal, religious, and cultural identity and how all facets of a person’s character impact their lived experiences as members of LGBTQA communities. The artists were curated by Dave Kube, Assistant Professor of Graphic Design in collaboration with students from the Exhibitions course at BU, and their faculty advisor, and were chosen based on their interpretation of the Conference theme.

This year’s Mid-Atlantic LGBTQA Conference focuses on intersectionality and how identities are constructed and deconstructed. The focus of intersectionality is about how different identities of oppression experience the world in different ways based on each individual’s multifaceted experiences and compiled identities. To accomplish this, the conference will feature a series of panels by numerous scholars, activists, artists, students, and professionals. These panelists will look at queer histories, sub-cultures, as well as provide various opportunities for discussing these complicated ideas.

Deadline nears for PEG applications

Professional U

Consideration is currently being given to Professional Experience Grant applicants seeking financial assistance to help with expenses for Winter Session or Spring Semester professional experiences.

Applications will be accepted until award decisions are made on Nov. 30.

A PEG is a monetary award, similar to a scholarship, that students may use for expenses, such as program fees, tuition and fees, personal expenses or employment stipend, associated with a professional experience. Any degree student in good academic standing planning to engage in study abroad, an internship, faculty mentored, research, field experience and other career-related experiences may apply.

CAS screens Love Thy Nature

Continuing the Celebrity Artist Series’ “Mostly Mondays at the Movies,” the third film in the yearlong independent series, “Love Thy Nature,” will be screened Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

“Love Thy Nature” tackles the relationship between humans and nature through a cinematic journey of the natural world. Narrated by actor Liam Neeson, the film immerses viewers through cinematic artistry on how our renewed connection with the environment is key to our wellbeing and to solving environmental crises. The film explores how nature nourishes humanity and how a new era of connectedness could bring about a biological revolution.

After the film, there will be a discussion with the director, Sylvie Rokab.Tickets are $3.50 in advance and $4 at the door. Tickets are available at the Haas Center box office, 570-389-4409.

Poetry slam comes to Multicultural Center

Gabriel Ramirez

Gabriel Ramirez, a writer, actor, poet, playwright, and past poetry slam champion, will perform slam poetry on Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Multicultural Center.

Gabriel Ramirez is a 20-year-old lover of all things love and author of his Chapbook, “Praise Love.” Ramirez is the 2012 Knicks Poetry Slam Champion, a member of the 2012 Urban Word NYC slam team that placed sixth in the international Brave New Voices Festival. He was featured in a production of one man shows titled, “Black Ink,” where he debuted “Sankofa,” a one man show he wrote and acted. Ramirez has performed on Broadway at the New Amsterdam Theatre, New York Live Arts, Lincoln Center, Apollo Theatre and other venues around the country.

Ramirez was featured on Upworthy.com twice and at a TEDxYouth Conference. He ranked second in New York City in Youth Slam and won the 2013 National Youth Poetry Slam Championship in Boston. Ramirez’s visit is presented by the Student Organization of Latinos and is sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

Alumna to speak about MBA program

Gloria Gerrity

Gloria Gerrity, vice president at Geisinger Medical Center, will speak about Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s MBA program on Monday, Nov. 7, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in Centennial Hall, room 170.

An alumna of BU’s MBA program, Gerrity’s talk is the first in a planned series of “MBA Storyteller” talks that are free and open to the public. Gerrity is vice president of operations for the pediatrics’ service line and Janet Weis Children’s Hospital for Geisinger Health System in Danville. She also serves on the Bloomsburg University College of Business Advisory Board.

Gerrity earned a bachelor’s degree in management from the University of Maryland and a master’s degree in health care administration from the University of Minnesota. In her career, Gerrity has been involved in physician group practice acquisitions, developing innovative business models for pediatric specialty care and managing operations at Janet Weis Children’s Hospital.

Want to help shape the agenda of the next President?

Washington Center

You’ve heard the issues. You’ve seen the candidates. It’s time to rise above the noise of current political discourse.

Are you up for the challenge? You’re invited to apply to The Washington Center’s Presidential Inauguration 2017 academic seminar. To learn more contact Laura McCay Suchanick at lmccay@bloomu.edu.

Other Professional U opportunities you may be interested in:

  • The Harrisburg Internship Semester (THIS) — If you’re interested in completing an internship during the Spring 2017 semester, then consider applying to The Harrisburg Internship Semester. Any major can apply, but you must demonstrate an interest in public policy or public service and have a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Interns are employed full-time five days a week and attend a weekly evening seminar. Interns will earn a total of 15 credits and considered employees of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, which pays a $5,500 stipend. Applications are still open and the deadline to apply is Monday, Nov. 7. For more information, please contact Jessy Defenderfer at jdefende@bloomu.edu.
  • Fine-tune your Interviewing skills with a leading employer? — Travelers, an insurance leader, will be on campus on Thursday, Nov. 10, to conduct mock interviews for anyone interested in fine-tuning their interviewing skills. This opportunity is open to all majors, regardless of career interest. To request a mock interview, log in to Husky Career Link and search for OCR: Mock Interview to apply by Friday, Nov. 4. Be sure that your resume is updated! For more information, please contact the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience at cpdce@bloomu.edu.

Speaker to brew ZIPD keynote

Rhonda Kallman

The 2016 Zeigler Institute for Professional Development (ZIPD) Business Conference will feature Rhonda Kallman, co-founder of the Boston Beer Co. and founder and CEO of Boston Harbor Distillery, as the keynote speaker. The speech on Thursday, Nov. 3, at 3:30 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium, is open to the public.

In her presentation, “Brewing Up Success,” Kallman will share how she assembled a sales force, built her empire and opened the door for women in the beer industry. At age 24, Kallman and business partner Jim Koch cofounded the Boston Beer Co., maker of Sam Adams. Together, they created one of the most successful craft beer companies in the United States. Kallman was honored in 1990 with a Recognition Award as a “Pioneering Woman in the Beer Industry” by the Institute for Brewing Studies.

Later, Kallman created her own business, Boston Harbor Distillery, to focus on whiskey production. Through the Boston Harbor Distillery, she paved the way for artisans to make world-class spirits, while showcasing the art of distillation and promotion education in Boston’s beverage community.

BU one of "Best Value Top Colleges"

Best Value Colleges

Bloomsburg University recently made the ranks of the ETC College Rankings Index designating Bloomsburg as a one of 2017 Best Value Top Colleges. Bloomsburg University is ranked 123 out of 1,195 in ETC rankings and the Best Value Top Colleges out of the first 398 colleges.

ETC College Ranking Index ranks the colleges not the students. Other college rankings list usually focus on Colleges academic achievements, which means the students rank high and not the school. The ETC College Ranking Index ranks use data and analytics in methodology to see what colleges will give students the best experiences.

BU being ranked 123 exceeded several larger universities, such as Villanova, Robert Morris, Temple, Notre Dame and West Virginia. BU also ranked higher than several other Pennsylvania schools, such as West Chester, Neumann, Shippensburg, East Stroudsburg, Bucknell and California University of Pa.

BU Players present Rocky Horror

A cult classic travels to Bloomsburg with the BU Players’ production of “The Rocky Horror Show.” The show will run from Thursday, Nov. 3, through Sunday, Nov. 6, in Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center St., Bloomsburg.

In the well-known story made famous by the 1975 film starring Barry Bostwick and Susan Sarandon, newly engaged couple Brad and Janet are stranded in a storm, but find safe haven — or so they think — at the nearby castle, the home of Dr. Frank-N-Furter, a mad, but sweet, scientist and his associates.

Color Run sets pace for spring's Relay for Life

CAC Color Run

Bloomsburg University’s Colleges Against Cancer chapter recently raised more than $2,800 with its annual “Color your World with Hope” 5K Color Run at the Bloomsburg Town Park.

The goal of this event is to raise money and awareness of cancer on campus and throughout the community. It is also a precursor for the annual Relay for Life that takes place in the spring — this year, April 9, 2017.

The color run is a 5K run where participants will get color powder thrown on them as they complete the course. There are six stations and each station is a different color. The colors are affiliated with different months of the year that represent different types of cancer. This is the third year the Color Run organized by Colleges Against Cancer has happened at BU. Last year, the chapter had approximately 500 participates and raised more than $4,000. Chair of the Color Run, senior Sofia Rosen, hopes to raise within the same amount of money this year.

“This event is the start to raising money for the Relay for Life in the spring,” said Rosen.

Ready to study abroad? As early as winter session!

France Study Abroad

Opportunities to study abroad are plentiful, providing a chance to tour exotic cities as well as study in a multicultural environment for credit. Bloomsburg University’s Office of Global and Multicultural Education offer a number of faculty-led study abroad trips for the winter and summer sessions from Spain to Norway to Morocco.

In the winter term, travel to Spain for an experience like no other as you learn about the history of Madrid and Toledo, enjoy a day at the beach in Barcelona and better your Spanish through this cultural immersion.

The summer session offers a number of trips led by faculty all over Europe. In London, England students’ exposure to the arts comes from visiting museums, plays, touring London and even a trip to Shakespeare’s home. Or travel to beautiful Italy for a unique practicum for Education majors. The College of Education is facilitating a trip to Reggio Emilia, Italy to allow students a teaching experience in a whole new element all while touring Venice and Rome.

Finally, in the summer, study abroad in Norway to explore the stunning landscapes and cultural history Norway has to offer. Or experience Morocco fully by staying with a host family, riding camels through the Sahara Desert and learning Arabic at your own pace.

Research on religion and politics wins Goorha award

Prateek Goorha Award

Looking at the current political landscape Justice Powlus has wondered many things, such as what makes people think gender discrimination is okay and is there commonality amongst these people?

The topic struck a chord, so the Bloomsburg University political science major researched it. And in fact, he won an award for it.

“Even though America has some belief in separation of church and state, it does not always seem to be entirely true,” said Powlus, who recently won the Prateek Goorha Best Research Paper Award for his research on whether religious attendance correlates to individual’s outlook on a number of gender issues, including abortion and domestic violence. “This paper seeks to explore if there is a correlation between a person’s religiousness, more specifically, the person’s religious attendance, and an assortment of gender related issues within today’s American society.”

His research award includes a $500 scholarship made possible by Prateek Goorha, a former BU professor who made a generous contribution to the Department of Political Science in support of undergraduate research. The political science department selects the best research methods paper out of the research papers submitted in Research in Political Science course every semester.

“I chose political science as my major, because I hoped it would broaden my understanding of the U.S. legal system and government,” said Powlus, adding that majoring in political science is getting him a step closer to law school.

CLE brings Alex's Lemonade Stand to campus

Alex's Lemonade Stand

What’s more refreshing than ice cold lemonade?

You could say raising nearly $300 in two days to help support the fight against pediatric cancer. And that’s exactly what Bloomsburg University’s Center for Leadership and Engagement recently did with the help of the Presidential Leadership Program.

Inspired by the touching story of Alexandra Scott, the students held an Alex’s Lemonade Stand (ALS) fundraiser, co-sponsored by the Colleges Against Cancer, on the Quad selling cups of lemonade for $1. Proceeds from the two-day sale benefitted the ALS Foundation, which helps fund critically needed research to find better treatments and cures for childhood cancer.

According to Bailey E. Donato, of CLE and coordinator of the lemonade stand fundraiser, one of the most memorable moments of the fundraiser was an anonymous gentleman who donated $100, encouraging the group to hand out free lemonade to everyone passing by.

Deadline nears for PEG applications

Professional U

Consideration is currently being given to Professional Experience Grant applicants seeking financial assistance to help with expenses for Winter Session or Spring Semester professional experiences. Applications will be accepted until award decisions are made on Nov. 30.

A PEG is a monetary award, similar to a scholarship, that students may use for expenses, such as program fees, tuition and fees, personal expenses or employment stipend, associated with a professional experience. Any degree student in good academic standing planning to engage in study abroad, an internship, faculty mentored, research, field experience and other career-related experiences may apply.

CAS presents Ruby McCollum film

Bloomsburg University's Celebrity Artists Series will continue its “Mostly Mondays at the Movies” series with the film, “You Belong to Me — Sex, Race and Murder in the South.” The film will show on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

The film follows the case of Ruby McCollum, the wealthiest black woman in Suwannee County, Fla., who shot state Senator-elect Dr. Clifford LeRoy Adams on Aug. 3, 1952, in the heart of Jim Crow South. This bizarre murder case turned a light on the blind indifferences and humiliations of the old South. Sixty years later, the scars and divides of McCollum’s case are still felt in Live Oak, Fla.

After the screening, there will be a discussion with producer Jude Hagin. Tickets are $3.50 in advance or $4 at the door. Tickets can be purchased at the Haas Center box office, 570-389-4409.

Partnering with On Screen/In Person, a Mid-Atlantic States independent film festival, the Celebrity Artist Series is showing six independent films accompanied by one professional involved in the film on Mondays or Wednesdays throughout the year.

9/11 tragedy inspires research path

Elizabeth Miller

Although just 6 years old at the time, Sept. 11, 2001 is a day Elizabeth Miller can never forget.

Her father, a firefighter with the FDNY Rescue Engine Co. 5 in Staten Island, was among the 343 firefighters who died responding to the World Trade Center terrorist attacks. The tragedy not only left a lasting impact on her life but shaped her academic interests she holds to this day, including a research focus on Islamic fundamentalism and terrorism.

“I decided to look at the United States policies that shaped some of the grievances that Bin Laden had, like the stationing of troops in Saudi Arabia,” said Miller, who served on two panels last week at the Liberal Arts Symposium. “Basically, looking at what the United States was doing in the regions of the Middle East that Bin Laden spoke out about in his religious opinions.”

Duo has research published in Mathematics Magazine

Math Research Published

Devyn Lesher, a junior mathematics major, and Chris Lynd, professor of mathematical and digital sciences, recently had their research paper accepted for publication in Mathematics Magazine — a widely read, peer-reviewed journal. The paper is titled Convergence Results for the Class of Periodic Left Nested Radicals and it should be in print in the December 2016 issue of Mathematics Magazine.

This research was made possible by two Undergraduate Research Scholarship and Creative Activities (URSCA) Awards from the Center for Undergraduate Research at Bloomsburg University. These awards provided stipends support for Devyn during the summer of 2014 and the summer of 2015.

During that time, Lesher learned about an area of mathematics that is rarely taught in an undergraduate program. He used his programming skills to perform computer simulations, discover patterns, and make conjectures about his mathematical patterns. Once the mathematical conjectures were formalized, Lesher got to see first-hand how to construct mathematical proofs, how to write a formal research paper in mathematics, and how to submit a paper for publication.

Competitive internship in NYC leads to return offer

UnitedHealth Group Internship

Landing an internship with UnitedHealth Group, the largest private health insurer in the world, is no easy task. Out of 8,000 applicants only 25 are chosen to spend the summer in New York City with the Fortune 500 company.

Brett Logan, a senior computer science major, was one of them.

“Not only was the culture a perfect fit for me, but my interviewer sealed the deal for me,” said Logan, who worked specifically with Optum Technologies, UnitedHealth Group’s technology subsidiary. “I was fortunate that he would later be my boss for the summer.”

During the internship, Logan worked on an internal project to reduce development time of new software written in COBOL, computer-programming language designed for use in commerce. Logan said Bloomsburg University’s computer science program provided him with everything he needed to excel at the internship, including some software he previously written in class.

“I was able to adapt extremely quickly to the new languages,” Logan said. “Some of the software I wrote in class actually became the basis for a major part of the server environment in the search engine.”

Study abroad sets table for research

Lydia Stebbins

Lydia Stebbins’s research has already taken her through the quaint food markets of culturally rich Xalapa, Mexico, and will soon go global again — this spring into another cultural hub, Morocco.

Bloomsburg University’s study abroad programs have not only provided a basis for her research on the “impact of socioeconomic globalization on local markets” but have given the anthropology major an added marketability for her future.

“(Studying abroad) helped set me apart with my language abilities and how I look on job applications,” said Stebbins, who will discuss her summer experience and research on Friday, Oct. 14, at the Liberal Arts Symposium as part of two different panels.

Stebbins, a Wymer and Warner anthropology scholar and URSCA award winner, studied Spanish and the Mexican culture this past summer at the Universidad Veracruzana-Xalapa. Her research was done through subtle observation, investigating local perceptions of the effects of global supermarkets on traditional markets, the economy, health, and culture.

Professor helps select Fulbright scholars

Faith Warner

Faith Warner, anthropology professor at Bloomsburg University, has been selected to serve a three-year term on the U.S. Student Fulbright National Screening Committee. Warner received a Fulbright award in 1995 to conduct research with the Guatemalan Maya peoples in United Nations-sponsored Mexican refugee camps. She spent 22 months conducting field work, and she credits the Fulbright award, which paid for half of her research experience, with enabling her to finish her doctoral dissertation.

The screening committee reviews and rates approximately 60 to 75 applications from students wishing to pursue study, research or professional training abroad under the Fulbright-Hays Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State. Warner will help to select students for Fulbright awards to conduct research in Mexico.

“The process is very selective,” Warner said, “and is based on a detailed application, academic record, quality of the research proposal, and fluency in the native language.”

A Bloomsburg University faculty member since 1997, Warner earned a bachelor’s degree from BU and master’s and doctoral degrees from Syracuse University. Her honors include the Charles R. Jenkins Award for distinguished achievement from Lambda Alpha, the national collegiate honors society in anthropology, and the Roscoe Martin Award for dissertation research from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University.

“Being named a Fulbright scholar positively impacts a student’s confidence and provides financial aid. It changes your perception of yourself and affirms the quality of the work you are pursuing,” Warner said. “As a graduate student, it was an affirmation of my work as a scholar and my greatest encouragement.”

Solo student show at Greenly Center

Solo Student Exhibit

Featuring works by recent graduate Kassandra Stachowski and senior Katie Starliper, Bloomsburg University’s Department of Art and Art History has opened its first student solo show that will run from through Oct. 27 in BU’s Gallery at Greenly Center. The show is free and open to the public.

Stachowski’s show, “Deep Haze,” features work influenced by her studies in fiber, theater and anthropology as a reflection of her life in the larger world. A Plains native, she earned bachelor’s degrees in anthropology and art studio, with a minor in theater arts, in 2015. Starliper’s show, “1000 Words,” focuses on the relationship between art and text with many pieces acting as visual poems. Starliper is a senior from Pottstown majoring in art studio and English.

These two separately themed exhibitions are a part of the new student solo show initiative developed to exhibit outstanding undergraduate work and juried by BU faculty. A faculty committee selected each artist based on aesthetic merit and the student’s goals for curating a show. A student solo show is planned for each fall and spring to provide professional experience and opportunities for dialogues on art within the community.

ROTC cadet completes intensive abroad program

ROTC Cadet Abroad

Army ROTC cadet Laura Albright, a history major, completed an intensive Russian language program this past summer at University of North Georgia in Dahlonega, Georgia. Albright received a full scholarship to complete this course by Project Go, an initiative created by the Department of Defense to teach military cadets across the country critical languages such as Russian, Chinese, and Arabic.

According to Albright, the class consisted of 15 students, along with two tutors, and one professor from Russia, that had lived in America several years. The program was only six-weeks long, but it was incredibly rigorous.

“Every weekday, class started at 0830 and ended at 2000; there were only breaks for lunch, dinner, and tutoring. At night, we completed homework and studied for daily quizzes” Albright explained. “The workload was tough, but manageable.”

Saturday’s were spent learning more about the Russian Culture, including traditional dishes, dances, and classic Russian films.

“One Saturday, our class went on a field trip to the suburbs of Atlanta. First, we visited a Russian Orthodox Church and learned about their traditions and practices,” Albright said. “Then, we went to a nursing home for elderly Russian people. Lastly, on the field trip we went to a market with authentic Russian cuisine. There, my friends and I purchased and cooked пельнянь (pelmeni), which are similar to dumplings.”

To complete the program, the students were required to take the Oral Proficiency Interview test to measure their ability to listen, understand, and respond in Russian.

‘Junk Space’ exhibit comes to campus

Junk Space Exhibit

Contemporary painter Brady Haston will bring his latest work to the exhibition, “Junk Space” opening at Bloomsburg University’s Haas Gallery of Art on Wednesday, Oct. 5. This event is free and open to the public.

Haston lives and teaches in Nashville, Tenn. where his work has been influenced by the city. His work, primarily contemporary abstract paintings, focuses on superficial and casual observations of Nashville in relation to exploring references of the past and future.

Haston received his Bachelors of Fine Arts from Middle Tennessee State University and his Master of Fine Arts at Montana State University. He is an associate professor at the Watkins College of Art and Design in Nashville where he has been awarded the Professional Development Grant six times. His work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions in major cities across the country including Chicago, Nashville and New York for the past 18 years. His work is often exhibited at the Zeitgeist in Nashville.

Mass Communications to host Google News Lab training

Google News Lab

Debora Wengar, Google News Lab national trainer, is conducting a hands-on skills training for Google Tools most helpful to journalists on Monday, Oct. 24, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the Andruss Library computer lab room 243.

Wengar is an associate professor of journalism and department chair at the University of Mississippi. She is also co-author of the Society of Professional Journalists Journalism Training Program Wengar writes about journalism and new media skills online at advancingthestory.com. She has conducted skills training for hundreds of journalists around the country.

The Society of Professional Journalists and the Google News Lab teamed up in 2015 to provide training and outreach to journalists around the United States looking to apply Google tools in their news gathering, reporting and storytelling. This event is sponsored by Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s Mass Communications Department. The training is open to faculty, students and media professions in the Bloomsburg community.

DNC official to discuss voting

Donna Brazile

With Election Day quickly approaching, veteran Democratic political strategist Donna Brazile will speak on campus about the importance of voting on Tuesday, Oct. 18, at 6 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. This program is free and open to the public.

Brazile’s political career began when she was 9-years-old as she worked to successfully elect a city council candidate who promised to build a playground in her native New Orleans. Through her passion for political progress and four decades of state and local campaigns, Brazile worked on every presidential campaign from 1976 to 2000, when she became the first African American to manage a presidential campaign.

Joining Brazile on Oct. 18 is Karen Smith Coates, who will speak about the importance of involvement in the state government. Coates, who graduated from BU in 1985, is chief of staff and chief counsel in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and director of legislative affairs in the Pennsylvania House Republican Caucus. A graduate of Penn State Dickinson School of Law, Coates is the first female chief of staff to the speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, which is the highest position in the State House.

Two poets featured in Big Dog Reading Series

Big Dog Reading Series

Poets Dawn Leas and Todd Davis will read from their works as a part of the Big Dog Reading Series on Tuesday, Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. in Kehr Union, room 341A. This program is free and open to the public.

Leas is author of a full-length collection, “Take Something When You Go,” and a chapbook, “I Know When to Keep Quiet.” Her work has appeared in the anthology “Everyday Escape Poems” and in journals like the Cumberland River Review, Clear Poetry and Pedestal Magazine. Leas earned her bachelor’s in communication with a minor in English from the University of Scranton and her master’s in creative writing from Wilkes University. She is the assistant to the president at Wilkes University.

Davis is the author of five full-length collections, “Winterkill,” “In the Kingdom of the Ditch,” “The Least of These,” “Some Heaven” and “Ripe” as well as a limited edition chapbook, “House of Water, Moon and Snow: The Thoreau Poems.” His poems have been nominated for honors, including the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry, and included in journals and magazines like the American Poetry Review. Davis teaches creative writing, American literature and environmental studies at Pennsylvania State University’s Altoona Campus.

Husky Career Road Trip

Career Road Trip

Calling all digital forensics, computer science, and ITM majors! More than 700 BU graduates are employed by Geisinger Health System, a nationally recognized integrated health services organization.

You could become one of them. Sign up to take this special Husky Career Road Trip to Geisinger IT in Danville on Wednesday, Oct. 19, and learn about applying your technology skills in the health care industry. Find out about Geisinger’s internship application process and full-time career opportunities. Afterward, expand your professional contacts at a networking social with alumni who are employed at Geisinger at the Pine Barn Inn.

Bus departs from Alumni House Parking lot at 12:30 p.m. and returns to campus at 7:30 p.m. Space is limited — RSVP required. Sign up at Husky Career Link. Must bring student ID for check-in! Questions? Contact the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience, 201 SSC. Ext. 4070.

Trustee leads Homecoming parade

Bloomsburg University celebrated homecoming on Saturday, Oct. 15, with an annual parade, alumni tent party, home football game and other activities. A special celebration was also held to mark 50 years since Greek Life was established at the university.

Trustee LaRoy Davis, a BU alumnus and ardent Huskies fan, served as parade grand marshal. A retired educator, Davis of Feasterville has served on the university’s Council of Trustees since 1980. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Bloomsburg in 1967, returning later for post-master’s work. He and his wife, Hedy Fuchs Davis, who earned a master’s degree from BU in 1982, are avid supporters of BU athletics through a student scholarship and involvement in the BU Alumni Association.

Study abroad sets table for research

Lydia Stebbins

Lydia Stebbins’s research has already taken her through the quaint food markets of culturally rich Xalapa, Mexico, and will soon go global again — this spring into another cultural hub, Morocco.

Bloomsburg University’s study abroad programs have not only provided a basis for her research on the “impact of socioeconomic globalization on local markets” but have given the anthropology major an added marketability for her future.

“(Studying abroad) helped set me apart with my language abilities and how I look on job applications,” said Stebbins, who will discuss her summer experience and research on Friday, Oct. 14, at the Liberal Arts Symposium as part of two different panels.

Stebbins, a Wymer and Warner anthropology scholar and URSCA award winner, studied Spanish and the Mexican culture this past summer at the Universidad Veracruzana-Xalapa. Her research was done through subtle observation, investigating local perceptions of the effects of global supermarkets on traditional markets, the economy, health, and culture.

Curry documentary to help showcase world of liberal arts

George Curry

Co-executive producers Alfredo Mercuri, videographer and film editor, and Jason Genovese, professor and chair of the mass communications department, will discuss the successes and challenges of producing the film, “Curry: God. Family. Football.” during Bloomsburg University’s second Liberal Arts Symposium.

The talk and free film screening will take place on Friday, Oct. 14, from 9 a.m. to 10:50 a.m. in McCormick Center for Human Services, room 2303.

The two-day Liberal Arts Symposium on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 13 and 14, will offer sessions on choosing a career or major, leadership skills, personal finances, study abroad, interpersonal communication and community engagement. Students, faculty and alumni will lead the sessions.

9/11 tragedy inspires research path

Elizabeth Miller

Although just 6 years old at the time, Sept. 11, 2001 is a day Elizabeth Miller can never forget.

Her father, a firefighter with the FDNY Rescue Engine Co. 5 in Staten Island, was among the 343 firefighters who died responding to the World Trade Center terrorist attacks. The tragedy not only left a lasting impact on her life but shaped her academic interests she holds to this day, including a research focus on Islamic fundamentalism and terrorism.

“I decided to look at the United States policies that shaped some of the grievances that Bin Laden had, like the stationing of troops in Saudi Arabia,” said Miller, who will serve on two panels Friday, Oct. 14, at the Liberal Arts Symposium. “Basically, looking at what the United States was doing in the regions of the Middle East that Bin Laden spoke out about in his religious opinions.”

Webinar discusses science behind learning styles

Beth Rogowsky

Terrence Sejnowski, professor of Biology at the University of California, San Diego, and Beth A Rogowsky, assistant professor of teaching and learning, will speak about the science behind learning styles and what impact learning styles have on students on Monday, Oct. 17, at 12 p.m. on www.brainfacts.org.

Sejnowski is a computational neuroscientist whose goal is to understand the principles that link brain to behavior. He is an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, holds the Francis Crick Chair at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, and he is co-director of the Institute for Neutral Computation and co-director of the NSF Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center.

Rogowsky has 14 years of classroom experience teaching English language arts to middle level learners in both rural and urban settings. Rogowsky completed three years of postdoctoral training at the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience at Rutgers University linking her previous teaching experience with the science of learning. She seeks to conduct scientific research that improves our understanding of how students learn as well as student outcomes.

Murder mystery to be solved via CAS

CAS Murder on the Nile

Solve Aquila Theatre’s production of Agatha Christie’s murder mystery “Murder on the Nile” on Friday, Oct. 14, at 7:30 p.m. in Bloomsburg University’s Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. This program is a part of the Celebrity Artist Series.

In Christie’s own staging of her novel “Death on the Nile,” passengers on board a paddle steamer cruising the Nile River in 1940s Egypt find class, money and reputation at stake as they are immersed in a case of deceit, theft and murder. Christie has been regarded as a best-selling novelist of all time by The Guinness Book of World Records, only selling behind Shakespeare and the Bible.

Aquila Theatre returns to Bloomsburg with their new production of this murder mystery as the troupe celebrates its 25th anniversary.

FOCUS ready for Homecoming visitation

Bethel Deliverance International

Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Oct. 16, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and Homecoming blessings. Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods at 570-389-4091 for details.

Homecoming Court Election

Homecoming Court

Meet the top five Homecoming King and Queen finalists. Choose one King and Queen by voting online through today until 10 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 13. Homecoming Committee hours on the SSC Patio are 2 to 4 p.m., Wednesday, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Thursday.

You must have earned at least 30 credits to vote in the King and Queen elections. Spirit week giveaways will be handed out on the SSC Patio during voting hours.

Top 5 Finalists

  • Queen Candidates — Kate Armstrong, sponsored by NCASC; Jenna Kovalsky, sponsored by NBS; Syndey Warick, sponsored by OWLs; Monica Williams, sponsored by Phi Sigma Sigma; and Christina Yurek, sponsored by Cheerleading
  • King Candidates — Cody Deitz, sponsored by Columbia Hall; Kevin Koch, sponsored by Colleges Against Cancer; Zach Kostus, sponsored by OWLs; Sean Porter, sponsored by NBS; and Breyon Young, sponsored by IFC

Off-Campus Housing Fair

Bloomsburg Off-Campus Housing

Bloomsburg University's Dean of Students Office is hosting an off-campus housing fair on Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Kehr Union Building, Multipurpose Room A/B. This fair provides an opportunity for students interested in living off-campus for the 2017-18 school year to meet local landlords, review available properties, and learn about pricing.

More than 30 landlords will be present to answer any questions about off-campus living including available payment plans, amenities included, parking, utilities, upgrades or remodels, and sample leases will be available to the students to read and review conditions of the leases.

Parents Night Out

Kappa Delta Pi

Bloomsburg University’s Kappa Delta Pi, international education honor society is hosting their annual Parents Night Out. These honor students will be watching ages 6 to 12 on Friday, Oct. 14, from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center. There will be fun games and activities provided by Kappa Delta Pi. It will be $10 per child and $2 per additional child.

“It has helped our honor society build rapport with the community and shows the commitment level within each member," said Alexis Carroll, co-president of Kappa Delta Pi. "It is also a way for the members to get involved with children as every member is preparing to become future educators.”

According to Carroll, it is also beneficial to the children because they get the opportunity to get to know children from other districts. To register email pno.kdp@gmail.com. Include names and ages of children, allergies and other accommodations.

New options for Majors and Minors Fair

Majors and Minors Fair

Bloomsburg University will host a Majors and Minors Fair on Tuesday, Oct. 11, in the KUB Ballroom, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year, three new minors have been added to BU’s list of academic options.

The recently added minors include, archaeology from the Department of Anthropology, emergent media from the Department of Mass Communications, and spatial analysis and GIS from the Department of Environment, Geographical and Geological Sciences. With more than 50 majors and minors, the Majors and Minors Fair gives students the opportunity to explore all academic areas in one place, at one time.

Students can speak with faculty members, Graduate Assistants, or students from each department and often all three are represented at a table. All students are encouraged to attend, from freshmen to seniors.

Michelle Slusser from the Academic Advisement Center and Military Resources said, “This event is good for all students, not only freshman or undeclared, because some students are in a major that they are unhappy with or simply are not cut out for. This event gives them the opportunity to explore other majors.”

Communication studies sponsors scholarship symposium

McCormick Center

Pointing out both the benefits and challenges that come with developing communication skills, the Department of Communication Studies sponsors “Teaching Communication Consulting through Client Projects: A Rhetorical Approach.”

The presentation by Elizabeth and James Petre, one of three lectures that will be offered as part of the scholarship symposium, will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 11, at 2 p.m., in McCormick Center 3237. Admission is free and open to the public.

James Petre received his doctorate in speech communication from Southern Illinois University. He was a presenter and reviewer for conferences of the National Communication Association (NCA), Central States Communication Association (CSCA) and others. In 2015, he served as chair and program planner for the rhetorical theory and criticism interest group at the CSCA conference in Madison, Wis. Petre serves BU’s Communication Studies Program Review Committee, Curriculum and Planning and Assessment Committees, Safety Committee, and College of Liberal Arts Faculty Enhancement Committee.

Using AAC&U rubrics to assess general education

MyCore Presentation

A multidisciplinary group from Bloomsburg University recently presented at Drexel University’s 3rd Annual Assessment Conference, Academic Quality: Driving Assessment and Accreditation.

The group's presentation was unique, as student affairs, academic affairs and faculty from difference colleges combined efforts to address goals for promoting better communication and problem-solving skills of our higher education graduates. General education is by nature a multidisciplinary endeavor that requires a mechanism for accurately comparing student achievement across campus.

The Association of American Colleges and Universities rubrics provide flexible elements that are adaptable to both academic courses and co-curricular learning experiences, such as BU’s MyCore program.

Bloomsburg University MSCHE Self-Study

Carver Hall President's Office

Accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) is essential for the University. Not only does it affirm the University’s quality, it also is a federal requirement making students eligible for financial aid such as Pell grants and faculty able to apply for funding from federal agencies.

MSCHE member institutions approved the revised accreditation standards, Standards for Accreditation and Requirements of Affiliation (Thirteenth Editions). These seven revised standards will govern Bloomsburg University’s 2018-2019 Self Study Review process. The MSCHE Charge was given to the Steering Work Group by President Soltz on Sept. 13, 2016.

Pulitzer-winning author to lecture

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and best-selling author Nicholas Kristof will deliver a lecture, “Why You Should Care About the World (and How You Can Change It!)” at Bloomsburg University.

Sponsored by BU’s American Democracy Project, Vocation Exploration Initiative, and the College of Liberal Arts, Kristof will speak Monday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. Admission is free and open to the public.

A columnist for The New York Times since 2001, Kristof has spent his writing career traveling to more than 150 countries and living on four continents. His novels include “Half the Sky” and “A Path Appears.” Both Pulitzer Prizes were for his coverage of Tiananmen Square and the genocide in Darfur.

Getting their own classroom

A month into the semester, Bloomsburg University students have shaken off their summer vibe and returned to campus. In fact, many of them are set to take control of their own classroom this fall.

A new cohort of education majors have begun their student teaching placements, and several of them got their feet wet through a variety of practicums offered by the College of Education. A central component of COE's teacher education programs is quality field experiences — formal, required school and community activities that teacher candidates complete for the purpose of learning and professional development.

Toshiko Takaezu Rededication

Toshiko Takaezu

Long a predominant presence at Bloomsburg University, the bronze bell by Toshiko Takaezu is receiving a new “gate” and hanger on its permanent location on the Quad.

A ceremony is planned Thursday, Oct. 6, to celebrate this key element of BU’s Permanent Art Collection. Starting at 1:30 p.m., there will be a symbolic ringing of the bell, followed by opening remarks by James Brown, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, and then the keynote address by emeritus professor of art, Karl Beamer.

Beamer, as well as having a deep friendship with the artist, was instrumental in the construction and casting of the bell here on campus. It was a long and arduous process, taking a year, and had not been attempted before. It was completed in 1989 and It is the first known bell of its type in the United States. It is a treasured part of university history. BU also holds an extensive collection of Takaezus’ ceramic works.

Thinking internship? Try Washington D.C.!

A representative from The Washington Center will be on campus Wednesday, Oct. 5, and Thursday, Oct. 6, visiting classrooms and leading an information session with a student panel discussion.

The Washington Center provides students with an opportunity to obtain a summer internship in Washington D.C. and earn almost a full semester worth of credits at the same time. You can also go to The Washington Center over winter break to attend the Winter Inauguration Seminar — a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that you won’t want to miss out on.

Attend the information session and student panel discussion on Thursday at 5 p.m. in Student Services Center Room 004. You don’t want to pass up on your chance to be a young professional in D.C.

BU ranks among the U.S. News best

U.S. News and World Report

Bloomsburg University has once again made the list of top universities in the northern region of the country, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual ranking of U.S. colleges and universities.

In data released this week U.S. News lists BU as No. 104 of the Best Regional Universities for the northern region, tied with Caldwell, Plymouth State and William Paterson universities.

BU’s 79 percent retention rate (percentage of freshmen who return to school) is higher than the retention rate at several institutions that earned higher overall ratings, including Shippensburg and Mount Saint Mary’s universities and York and King’s colleges. It matches several institutions that earned higher overall ratings, such as Rider, Millersville, Wilkes and Philadelphia universities.

At 62 percent, Bloomsburg’s 2015 graduation rate exceeds those of higher ranked Shippensburg, Rutgers, Arcadia, Seton Hill, Chatham and Wilkes universities, and ties higher ranked Millersville and Waynesburg universities. And, with a 6 percent alumni giving rate, Bloomsburg has more participation than higher ranked public institutions, including Rowan, Rutgers, Towson and Millersville universities.

Career Connections Expo

No matter what major or stage of future planning, land a connection at Bloomsburg University’s Career Connections Expo on Friday, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Nelson Field House.

More than 100 organizations representing all types of industries will be on-site recruiting students for full or part-time jobs, internships, job shadowing experiences, as well as graduate programs opportunities.

Walk-ins are welcome. Professional dress is required to be admitted.

Why sweat the search?

The friendly atmosphere of a campus job fair event, such as this, makes it easy to explore career options and talk to representatives, because they are eager to talk to you. They are coming to campus because they know the value of hiring BU graduates!

Here's what attending can do for you, by …

  • exposing you to industries and employers even if you aren't ready to graduate yet
  • helping you gain confidence by allowing you to practice talking with hiring reps
  • giving you the chance to talk about yourself and be more than a paper resume
  • allowing you to make industry contacts and build a professional network

Mental health first aid training session

Todd Hastings

Todd Hastings, certified Mental Health First Aid Instructor and professor in the Department of Nursing, is facilitating a Mental Health First Aid training session Friday, Sept. 30, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Greenly Center, Lecture Room B-117 on 50 E. Main St. Bloomsburg.

Some members of our campus community could be at risk of having an emotional crisis and even signs of an emerging mental health problem. Mental Health First Aid is the help offered to a person developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis. The first aid is given until appropriate treatment and support are received or until the crisis resolves. A planned eight hour “Adult MHFA” training provides you with the skills to help.

Powder-puff raises more than $1,400 for March of Dimes

Powder Puff Fundraiser

Bloomsburg University’s Sigma Sigma Sigma recently raised more than $1,400 for the March of Dimes via its second annual Powder-Puff Football Tournament, held at Redman Stadium’s Danny Hale Field.

All proceeds benefitted the foundation, which works to improve general health of mothers and children.

Stacey Nocero, vice president of Tri Sigma, came up with the powder-puff football idea as a way to try something new and different for a fundraiser. Nocero was inspired by her high school, which hosts a powder-puff game every year. The game brings together every grade level and even the teachers participate as coaches, she said.

This year’s Tri Sigma Powder-puff tournament was a success. Ten sororities participated and helped raise more than twice the amount raised last year, according to Nocero.

Soil judging team wins bid to nationals

Soil Judging Team

A team of students from Bloomsburg University recently won the Northeast Regional Collegiate Soil Judging Contest hosted by Pennsylvania State University, qualifying to compete in the National Soil Judging Contest at Northern Illinois University in the spring.

BU entered two teams, led by Team A that finished first overall with 3,271 points and fifth in group judging with 570 points. Only the top four teams from the Northeast region qualify for nationals, so joining BU will be the University of Maryland, University of Rhode Island, and Delaware Valley College.

Four BU students also placed individually in the top 10 out of 84 competitors. Eric Franz placed second place with 918 points, Joshua Prezkop placed seventh with 892 points, Daniel Steinhauser tied for eighth with 891 points, and Ryan Sullivan placed tenth with 890 points.

“In the EGGS department soils lab, we were trained on the basics of how to determine the texture of the soil by hand and also the methods soil scientists use to describe the color,” said Steinhauser, describing some of the training prior to competition day.

Math major advances to finals of national competition

MAA Competition

Drawing from more than 400 colleges and universities, the Mathematics Association of America national Problem Solving Competition features some of the best math students in the country. And Luke Vuksta, a junior Bloomsburg University mathematics major, was among them. Vuksta advanced to the finals and earned a sixth place medal this past summer.

“The conference itself is much more than just a problem solving competition,” Vuksta said. “It focused on teaching, as well as pure mathematics. I actually didn’t know this until I met a bunch of math education majors at the undergraduate social event that was held.”

According to MAA, they help strengthen mathematical capabilities of the next generation of problem solvers. At the competition there are a series of examinations, and problem solving tasks they need to complete in the competition. They had sets of questions they had to solve while the judges watched how each person progressed.

Vuksta said this competition helped him beef up his resume, and although it is not exactly what a mathematician does, it allowed him to meet some great people.

Computer science internship lands Google Go proposal

Louis Jenkins

Louis Jenkins’s internship with Lehigh University’s R.E.U. program not only provided him with a unique research experience leading to publication and a Google Go proposal, but a lasting relationship with a mentee of one of the country’s renowned computer programmers.

According to the Bloomsburg University senior computer science major, he wasn’t initially looking for an academic research experience like this. Jenkins wanted an industry related internship — but in hindsight — he’s grateful for the summer spent at Lehigh working with Michael F. Spear, an assistant professor of computer science engineering. The summer experience also landed Jenkins an Outstanding Project: Peers’ Choice award for his work on “Concurrent and Scalable Built-in Hash Table for the Go Programming Language.”

Jenkins’s internship advisor was a doctoral student of Michael L. Scott, renowned computer programmer and the Arthur Gould Yates Professor of Engineering at the University of Rochester.

“The internship literally turned on its head,” Jenkins said. “Originally, it was looking okay, but I felt that my potential would be severely limited due to my lack of connections. However, besides for the excellent resume-fluff the award will add, the best award has to be meeting and getting to know my advisor. The project by itself wouldn't have been as amazing as it could've been, and there would be no research paper and it probably wouldn't have gotten anywhere.”

Professional U preps students for job market

Career Boot Camp

Nearly 60 juniors and seniors participated in Bloomsburg University’s Career Intensive Boot Camp last weekend, learning how to leverage their sills and experience to successfully navigate the transition from student to professional.

The students took part in more than 20 unique sessions on topics, such as what to expect the first week on the job, how to negotiate compensation and how to go to graduate school. An instructor-led etiquette dinner, mock interviewing and resume reviews were all part of the boot camp experience.

More than 60 alumni, faculty, staff and representatives of BU partner organizations volunteered for panel discussions or as session leaders. Michael A. Alfonso Sr. ’93, owner and president of Trilogy Group Benefits, LLC, a Pennsylvania corporate benefits firm, served as keynote speaker.

Students received certificates upon completion of the program. This and other boot camps are a hallmark of BU’s Professional U initiative, which aims to prepare students for personal and professional success after graduation. The next boot camp will be held in Spring 2017. Students will be able to register to attend via Husky Career Link

Get ready to "Unleash your vote!"

To help the campus community register to vote Bloomsburg University's American Democracy Project is sponsoring a rally on the Student Services Center patio today from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Trained volunteers will be there to help everyone with registration needs.

Free food, music, buttons, copies of the U.S. Constitution and more are part of the event.

Few elections in recent memory have had the potential for such long-lasting effects for our country. And few have been as unpredictable and tumultuous. For first-time voters this could be election with more at stake than any other they will see.

Anti-racism activist to speak

Tim Wise, an internationally acclaimed anti-racism activist, writer and educator, will speak on understanding and defeating race and class inequality in America on Monday, Sept. 26, at 6 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall.

Wise has spoken on more than 1,000 college and high school campuses in all 50 states. He is the author of seven books that explore the topic of racism in America. His most recent books include, “Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America” and “Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority.”

Wise, who graduated from Tulane University in New Orleans, received his anti-racism training from the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond. He has contributed to over 25 essays and has been featured in popular journals such as The Huffington Post and The Root. He regularly appears on CNN and has been featured on ABC’s “20/20.”

Wise’s visit and presentation are sponsored by BU’s Multicultural Center, College of Education, College of Liberal Arts, Center for Diversity and Inclusion, Office of Greek Affairs, Women’s Resource Center, Frederick Douglass Institute, LGBTA Resource Center, LGBTA Commission, and Campus-Wide Committee on Human Relations.

Career Intensive Boot Camps prepare students for success

New Work Reception

On Friday, Sept. 16, Derek Askew, Raijiene Dreuitt, Denis Ikejiri, Megan Ikeler, and Kevin Kesselring gathered to ring the Carver Hall bell prior to attending the BU Career Intensive Boot Camp.

Held at the Greenly Center this past weekend, the Career Intensive Boot Camp is a multi-day day experience offered to juniors, seniors and recent graduates as part of Bloomsburg University’s Professional U initiative.

The event is designed to help participants learn how to leverage their skills and experiences to not only get a job, but to be successful in their transition from student to professional.

Celebration of Cultures ignites cultivation

Celebration of Cultures

Celebration of Cultures is a brand new event being sponsored by Bloomsburg University’s Office of Global and Multicultural Education and the Office of Multicultural Affairs. The event will be held on Friday, Sept. 23, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the Quad (Rain Location: KUB Ballroom) for a fun day of activities and great food.

Friday’s events will start at 11 a.m. and will include Henna Painting, by BU student Sadman Mondalib, as well as international cuisine by various BU organizations, both being offered the entire day.

The activities that progress throughout the day are learning various dance styles like Zumba, salsa dancing and international folk dancing. As well as enjoy the sounds of Irish and Brazilian Music performed by Steve Gilliland. End the day with a soccer match between the faculty/staff and students. The Celebration of Cultures is free and open to the public.

For details on the full schedule of events, contact the Office of Global and Multicultural Education at globaleducation@bloomu.edu or visit 236 Student Services center.

Immigration expert to present film

Roy Germano, a research scholar at New York University School of Law and professor in the New York University Program on International Relations, will present and discuss his film, “The Other Side of Immigration” on Thursday, Sept. 22, at 6 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s McCormick Center for Human Services, room 1303.

Germano’s award-winning documentary investigates why many Mexicans immigrate to the United States and what happens to the families that are left behind. The film screening and discussion are open free to the public.

The documentary was produced while Germano surveyed 700 households from the countryside of Mexico for his doctoral research. The film, part of BU’s Global Issues Series, was recognized as a winner of the 2009 Politics of Film Founder’s Award and was included in the official selection of the 2009 Global Peace Film Festival.

Hungry? Low on cash?

Hungry Husky

Books, rent, loans, your car, spending money and food. Whether you’re taking out loans or paying right from your paychecks for college, sometimes food is your last choice. In some cases, food isn’t even an option and you can’t be the best you when you’re hungry.

Many low-income or financially independent students can go days without a meal in order to pay for other larger expenses. The new #FeedAHusky initiative will help students who are food-insecure have access to food and learn about the resources available to them.

On Mondays from 5 to 6 p.m. there will be free BU student nights at the food cupboard. The food cupboard is on 329 Center St., which is walking distance from campus. For more information, call 570-389-2222 or visit the Hungry Huskies portal.

Safety app

Husky Safe at BU

Bloomsburg University is adding one more tool to enhance campus safety for students, faculty and staff, an app nicknamed Husky Safe. The Husky Safe app primarily serves as an emergency communication tool between the campus community and Bloomsburg University Police. Features of the app, produced by 911Cellular under the name 911Shield, include:

  • Indoor Positioning System – IPS works off wireless access points on campus to pinpoint the location inside a building where help is needed and notify BUPD. IPS works in conjunction with GPS.
  • Emergency Calling – Users can access emergency services from BUPD at the push of a button on their cell phone.
  • iReports – Users can send text messages along with a photo or video directly to BUPD to alert them of any suspicious activity. The feature may be used anonymously.
  • Friend Watch – This peer-to-peer safety service allows app users to alert anyone in the contacts list when they feel the need for extra safety, such as returning from a class late at night.

Tom Phillips, director of BUPD, said Husky Safe is designed for use on campus only. BUPD will redirect calls received from beyond the campus’ borders to the appropriate 911 center. For emergency assistance in the Town of Bloomsburg or beyond, members of the campus community should call 911. The free app may be downloaded from the App Store or Google Play by searching 911Shield, selecting Bloomsburg and the appropriate group and following the prompts. For information, contact BUPD at 570-389-2211.

The following students have won the first round of the prize drawing for the Husky Safe Mobile App.

  • Alex Annan
  • Annalise Connell
  • Kris Kratohwill
  • Jessica Staros

The following students have won the second round of the prize drawing for the Husky Safe Mobile App.

  • Mackenzie Chaundy
  • Andrew Keller
  • Taylor Little
  • Alberto Ruiz

The following students have won the final round of the prize drawing for the Husky Safe Mobile App.

  • Maritza Almodovar
  • Marcelo Benatti
  • Meghan Faino
  • Cassandra Seifert
  • Justine Davis

'New Work' Closing Reception Set

New Work Reception

Closing reception for New Work, a show by Sue O’Donnell, associate professor of graphic design, will be held Wednesday, Sept. 21, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Haas Gallery. O’Donnell will present a gallery talk at 1:30 p.m.

O'Donnell is a visual artist whose work combines experimental book arts, graphic design, and conceptual narratives. Her constructions reveal secrets and life events that search out and map connections and paths that explore models of certainty, evolving emotions, and the concept of truth and memory.

“I use accepted models of truth-such as maps, time lines, and scientific displays-to explore the contrast between truth and fiction," O'Donnell said. "My work questions choices and recurring patterns and trends-much like a scientist searches for new discoveries. What I hope to reveal is not an ultimate truth, but a deeper understanding of the way we accept our own fields of memory by exposing and strengthening the connections we have within ourselves and with each other.”

The reception is open to the public free of charge.

Helping me become a Husky

Shawn Page

Shawn Page, a freshman, rang the Carver Hall bell Tuesday, Aug. 16, to celebrate the impact of the scholarship he received through the It's Personal campaign.

As a highly coveted offensive line prospect from Upper Darby, Page was heavily recruited by a number of Division II college programs in Pennsylvania, including West Chester and Lock Haven. He was also given the opportunity to join the football team as a preferred walk-on at the University of New Hampshire, a Division I program.

Page chose Bloomsburg University, because of the rich tradition of the Huskies football program and the effort with which he was recruited, along with being offered the Robert J. Kenney '84 Annual Football Scholarship.

“When I came here for my first visit with my father, and saw the campus and met with the coaches, I knew right away that this was the place for me,” Page said. “Knowing that I was being offered this scholarship and would also have the opportunity to attend a great state school with smaller classes that were best for my learning style made Bloomsburg the right choice.”

Assistant professor receives NCA Award

National Communication Association

Kai Kuang, assistant professor of communication studies has been selected as the National Communication Association’s 2016 recipient of the Gerald R. Miller Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award.

This award is given annually to new scholars who completed dissertations during the previous academic year. Kuang was recognized for her dissertation, “Uncertainty and Information Management: A Meta-Analytic Review of Uncertainty’s Effects on Information Management in Illness Contexts” that she completed at Purdue University.

The project focused on illness uncertainty and its impact on communicative behaviors and facilitating uncertainty management. Kuang will receive the award and present her winning dissertation during the National Communication Association’s annual convention in Philadelphia from Nov. 10 to 13.

Immigration expert to present, discuss film

Roy Germano, a research scholar at New York University School of Law and professor in the New York University Program on International Relations, will present and discuss his film, “The Other Side of Immigration” on Thursday, Sept. 22, at 6 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s McCormick Center for Human Services, room 1303.

Germano’s award-winning documentary investigates why many Mexicans immigrate to the United States and what happens to the families that are left behind. The film screening and discussion are open to the public and free of charge.

The documentary was produced while Germano surveyed 700 households from the countryside of Mexico for his doctoral research. The film, part of BU’s Global Issues Series, was recognized as a winner of the 2009 Politics of Film Founder’s Award and was included in the official selection of the 2009 Global Peace Film Festival.

Germano’s presentation and discussion are sponsored by the Office of Global and Multicultural Education, The International Faculty Association, Civic Engagement Center and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

Planning for No Hate Week

No Hate Week

A meeting to discuss Bloomsburg University's second annual No Hate Week will be held at 9 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 20, at the KUB Multicultural Center. Last fall, a group of multicultural Greek Life members noticed “No Hate” going nationally at several different schools, such as Ohio State and Miami University, participating in this week of sharing love.

In November of last year, about 100 students met at Carver Hall and spoke about hate and why everyone should come together. After speaking, the students marched silently to the Academic Quad with posters. Throughout that week speakers came in spoke about religion and hate in the LGBTQ community.

According to Marcella Woods, director of cultural affairs and support services, “No Hate is week is for everyone. People hate each other for several different reasons, it may because someone has a more expensive car, clothes, or shoes. But No Hate Week is about sharing LOVE to each other and to different causes.”

As No Hate Week is approaching, the first meeting students can expect a committee meeting discussing everyone ideas for speakers, panels and etc.

‘Broadway’s Next Big Hit’ premieres

The next big Broadway hit may be created in Bloomsburg University’s Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium on Saturday, Sept. 17, at 7:30 p.m. as part of the Celebrity Artist Series.

In “Broadway’s Next Hit Musical,” an improvised musical comedy, stage veterans, improv comedians and musicians will create a show of spontaneous music and comedy. The audience will suggest songs and scenes for the cast to improvise and perform and then vote on the scenes until they turn into a full-blown musical.

The cast, emcee and pianist are veterans of Broadway stages and some of New York City’s best improv comedians and musicians. The ensemble has spent 15 years crafting the ability to create a whole musical from a single audience suggestion.

FOCUS ready for first fall service

Bethel Deliverance International

Bloomsburg University’s Office of Cultural Affairs/ Student Support Services will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Sept. 18, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and new semester blessings. Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods at 570-389-4091 for details.

Safety app

Husky Safe at BU

Bloomsburg University is adding one more tool to enhance campus safety for students, faculty and staff, an app nicknamed Husky Safe. The Husky Safe app primarily serves as an emergency communication tool between the campus community and Bloomsburg University Police. Features of the app, produced by 911Cellular under the name 911Shield, include:

  • Indoor Positioning System – IPS works off wireless access points on campus to pinpoint the location inside a building where help is needed and notify BUPD. IPS works in conjunction with GPS.
  • Emergency Calling – Users can access emergency services from BUPD at the push of a button on their cell phone.
  • iReports – Users can send text messages along with a photo or video directly to BUPD to alert them of any suspicious activity. The feature may be used anonymously.
  • Friend Watch – This peer-to-peer safety service allows app users to alert anyone in the contacts list when they feel the need for extra safety, such as returning from a class late at night.

Tom Phillips, director of BUPD, said Husky Safe is designed for use on campus only. BUPD will redirect calls received from beyond the campus’ borders to the appropriate 911 center. For emergency assistance in the Town of Bloomsburg or beyond, members of the campus community should call 911. The free app may be downloaded from the App Store or Google Play by searching 911Shield, selecting Bloomsburg and the appropriate group and following the prompts. For information, contact BUPD at 570-389-2211.

The following students have won the first round of the prize drawing for the Husky Safe Mobile App.

  • Alex Annan
  • Annalise Connell
  • Kris Kratohwill
  • Jessica Staros

The following students have won the second round of the prize drawing for the Husky Safe Mobile App.

  • Mackenzie Chaundy
  • Andrew Keller
  • Taylor Little
  • Alberto Ruiz

'Transformational Imagemaking’ reception set

Transformational Imagemaking

Featuring work from 14 internationally recognized artists, a reception will be held at Bloomsburg University’s Gallery at Greenly Center for the current exhibition, “Transformational Imagemaking: Handmade Photography Since 1960” on Tuesday, Sept. 13, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This event is free and open to the public.

Robert Hirsch, one of the featured artists, will speak at 1:30 p.m. The exhibition also includes work by Binh Dahn, Rick Dingus, Robert Flynt, Betty Hahn, Dinh Q. Le, Curtis Mann, Bea Nettles, Holly Roberts, Clarissa Sligh, Keith Smith, Brian Taylor, Maggie Taylor and Jerry Uelsmann. The exhibition, curated by associate professor of graphic design Sue O’Donnell, focuses on artists who redefined photography and left a mark on contemporary photographic practices. The show will run through Sept. 20.

The original exhibition, featuring over 40 artists, opened at the CEPA Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y., in 2014 as a companion exhibition to Hirsch’s book by the same title. The Gallery at Greenly Center is located at 50 East Main St. in downtown Bloomsburg. This exhibition is made possible through BU’s Department of Art and Art History, College of Liberal Arts and Center for Visual and Performing Arts.

Global education office hosts Study Abroad Fair

China Study Abroad

Bloomsburg University's Office of Global and Multicultural Education is calling all students looking for a sense of adventure to broaden their educational experience by studying abroad. The Study Abroad Fair on Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 3 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose A will be held to educate prospective students on their chance to study abroad.

The fair will begin with a general information session led by the Director of Global and Multicultural Education, Nawal Bonomo. From there, students will be able to speak one-on-one with other students who have traveled abroad as well as those part of the exchange programs. Information about scholarships, third-party providers, exchange programs and faculty-led trips will all be discussed. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information, contact the Office of Global and Multicultural Education at globaleducation@bloomu.edu or visit 236 Student Services Center.

Hispanic Heritage Month celebration with Latin jazz

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, Bloomsburg University is hosting the Karen Rodriguez Latin Jazz Ensemble on Thursday, Sept. 15, at the Scranton Commons Amphitheater. Free food will be offered along with the ensemble’s live performance from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Unique and authentic, Rodriguez is described as the real deal.

“Others may attempt to convey a Latin sound by singing a bossa nova song, but she is indigenous to Latin music. Her parents are from Puerto Rico, she speaks, teaches, and sings in Spanish. is truly refreshing and sexy in her native tongue; exotic when sings a Cha Cha, but vulnerable when she sings a romantic Bolero. Seeing Karen perform live is like walking into a Cuban nightclub circa 1950.”

Thursday’s performance is expected to feature popular Latin styles such as Salsa, Cha-Cha, Bolero, Bossa Nova, Samba, Mambo, Tango, Rumba, Cuban, Latin/Jazz, Guaracha, and Tumbal. The ensemble’s visit to campus is sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

CAS Film Series

CAS Film Series

New to the Celebrity Artist Series this year is an independent film series throughout the 2016-17 season. Partnering with On Screen/In Person, a Mid-Atlantic States film festival, the film series will bring independent films and the professionals behind them to campus. Inspiring journeys, heartwarming tales, and the complexities of the world around us are captured in these films. The topics range from health and healthcare, social awareness, women’s empowerment, murder, nature and the earth. Following each film, there will be an open discussion with one professional involved in the creation of the film.

If you’re interested in films or any of the topics, this new film series will be a rare opportunity to see quality independent films and learn about the production behind them. All films will be shown at 7 p.m. in K.S. Gross Auditorium in Carver Hall:

  • “Sweet Dreams,” Monday, Sept. 12
  • “You Belong to Me - Sex, Race and Murder in the South,” Wednesday, Oct. 26
  • “Love Thy Nature” Nov. 7
  • “Hilleman – A Perilous Quest to Save the World’s Children” Monday, Feb. 6
  • “Real Boy” Wednesday, March 8
  • “States of Grace” Monday, April 3

Films cost $4 at the door or $3.50 in advance, with admission to the pre or post film discussion with the professional. Tickets are available at the Haas Center Box Office or at www.cas.buzz.

New initiative on barriers to learning

COE Initiative

A donation from a local philanthropist is supporting training to help educators identify students who are confronting non-academic barriers to learning. Susan McDowell, Selinsgrove, has committed a total of $200,000 to the Bloomsburg University Foundation to establish the Youth Mental Health First Aid program as part of BU’s McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support.

The funding supports a coordinator of school-based behavioral health within BU’s College of Education, outreach to school districts, and a copy of the related textbook for each education major.

The Danville Area School District is piloting the program this academic year, with the goal of training all administrators, counselors, teachers, nurses and coaches. McDowell and four BU faculty members completed the training, which was offered to all student teachers and school counseling students before they entered the classroom this fall. BU is the first teacher preparatory program to certify all student teachers.

Celebrity Artist Series

Though the latest Celebrity Artist Series can appear diverse, the fall season is united under one theme: adaption. From adaptions of works like Elf or an Agatha Christie mystery novel to adapting a whole piece off of an original idea, this season will feature unique translations of works and ideas to the stages of Bloomsburg University.

For the lover of all things Broadway, the fall season will start and end with a Broadway bang. Beginning with “Broadway’s Next Hit Musical,” the next hit musical could be created right here in Bloomsburg! The ensemble of Broadway stage veterans and improv comics will craft a full blown musical based on your suggestions. Ending right before winter break, everyone’s favorite elf Buddy from the hit movie “Elf” will be coming to Mitrani Hall! The National Broadway Tour of the exciting musical will bring the Christmas Spirit to campus.

In between these two hits will be three shows defined by originality and professionalism. “Nufonia Must Fall Live” will be a live multi-media adaption of a graphic novel helmed by puppeteers, miniature designers, musicians, and an Academy Award nominated director. Solve the classic mystery of murder, deceit and theft in the adaption of Christie’s novel “Murder on the Nile” performed by one of the world’s most acclaimed traveling theatre companies. Finally, enter a world of fantasy and dreams through the awe-inspiring feats of the Shanghai Acrobats latest show, “Shanghai Nights.”

Safety app

Husky Safe at BU

Bloomsburg University is adding one more tool to enhance campus safety for students, faculty and staff, an app nicknamed Husky Safe. The Husky Safe app primarily serves as an emergency communication tool between the campus community and Bloomsburg University Police. Features of the app, produced by 911Cellular under the name 911Shield, include:

  • Indoor Positioning System – IPS works off wireless access points on campus to pinpoint the location inside a building where help is needed and notify BUPD. IPS works in conjunction with GPS.
  • Emergency Calling – Users can access emergency services from BUPD at the push of a button on their cell phone.
  • iReports – Users can send text messages along with a photo or video directly to BUPD to alert them of any suspicious activity. The feature may be used anonymously.
  • Friend Watch – This peer-to-peer safety service allows app users to alert anyone in the contacts list when they feel the need for extra safety, such as returning from a class late at night.

Tom Phillips, director of BUPD, said Husky Safe is designed for use on campus only. BUPD will redirect calls received from beyond the campus’ borders to the appropriate 911 center. For emergency assistance in the Town of Bloomsburg or beyond, members of the campus community should call 911. The free app may be downloaded from the App Store or Google Play by searching 911Shield, selecting Bloomsburg and the appropriate group and following the prompts. For information, contact BUPD at 570-389-2211.

The following students have won the first round of the prize drawing for the Husky Safe Mobile App.

  • Alex Annan
  • Annalise Connell
  • Kris Kratohwill
  • Jessica Staros

The following students have won the second round of the prize drawing for the Husky Safe Mobile App.

  • Mackenzie Chaundy
  • Andrew Keller
  • Taylor Little
  • Alberto Ruiz
  • Celebrity Artist Series awarded three grants

    CAS 2016

    Bloomsburg University’s Celebrity Artists Series received $15,000 in grants and allocations from the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation in support of programming for the 2016-2017 season, which includes a new film series, Mostly Mondays at the Movies.

    “All grants were competitive and awarded based on the merit of the program and artistic value of the presentations,” said Randall Presswood, BU’s executive director of performing arts and programming.

    The grants are:

    • Arts CONNECT, providing $8,000 to cover a portion of the cost for “Nufonia Must Fall Live,” Saturday, Sept. 24, at 7:30 p.m. in Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Scratch disc jockey Kid Koala will present a multidisciplinary adaptation of a graphic novel featuring media, puppetry and live music.
    • Jazz Touring Network, $3,000 in support of this season’s only Pennsylvania performance by the new soul-fusion band, The Suffers. The program, on Feb. 26, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. in Mitrani Hall, will be offered in celebration of Black History Month and is co-sponsored by BU’s Multicultural Center. BU has presented 18 Jazz Touring Network grant-funded artists since becoming a member of the network in 2002.
    • On Screen/In Person, $2,400 to help fund the screening of six new independent films and presentations by the filmmakers. All films, part of CAS’s new Mostly Mondays at the Movies series, will be shown at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

    Additional funding from the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation offsets expenses related to choosing tours and artists for the upcoming Celebrity Artist Series, Presswood added.

    New Waller planned

    WAB Announcement

    A $37.5 million project will bring a new Waller Administration Building to the Academic Quad and extend the lifespan of the current Waller by as much as seven years.

    BU’s Trustees recently approved a plan to construct a new Waller on the site of the Centennial Hall parking lot. Previous discussion centered on relocating personnel housed in Waller across both the upper and lower campuses, demolishing the existing structure and rebuilding on the current site. The new plan calls for constructing a new building as the home to Waller’s current occupants, academic departments now in Old Science Hall, registrar, admissions, bursar and financial aid. After new Waller is complete, old Waller will house occupants of the oldest portion of the McCormick Center while renovations take place. Old Waller will then be demolished to make way for a staff parking lot. Duplicating and Receiving will remain in old Waller until its last days.

    During the special Trustees meeting, both BU President David Soltz and John Loonan, vice president for administration and finance, emphasized the cost savings associated with the new plan. The earlier plan, they said, would disrupt office functions and be inconvenient for students, campus visitors and faculty and staff.

    Built in 1972, the current Waller has been on the list of approved construction projects for the past four years. The contract for the new Waller is expected to be awarded in November 2018, with construction to begin in 2019 and move-in in 2021. Also planned is construction of a parking area near the Mitchell House to be completed next summer in conjunction with the major improvements to the intersection of Country Club Road/Lightstreet Road/Swisher Circle. The lot will replace spaces lost to the Waller construction.

    Faculty promotion and and tenure

    Faculty Tenure Promotions

    The following faculty members have been granted promotion effective Fall 2016:

    • Faculty promoted to professor — Kevin Ball, psychology; Nathalie Cornelius, languages and cultures; John Hintz, environmental, geographical, and geological sciences; Claire Lawrence, English; Eric Stouffer, psychology; Mark Tapsak, chemistry and biochemistry
    • Faculty promoted to associate professor — Michael Borland, chemistry and biochemistry; William Coleman, biological and allied health sciences; Monica Favia, management and marketing; Jason Genovese, mass communications; Joseph Hazzard, exercise science; Kathleen Heitzman, athletics; Mary King, communication studies; Michael McFarland, athletics; Matthew Slotkin, music, theatre and dance
    • Faculty promoted to assistant professor — Tara Diehl, academic enrichment

    The following faculty members have been granted tenure effective Fall 2016:

    • Michael Borland, chemistry and biochemistry
    • Kimberly Cardimona, audiology and speech pathology
    • William Coleman, biological and allied health sciences
    • Michael McFarland, athletics
    • Matthew Slotkin, music, theatre and dance

    English majors among first-ever undergrad presenters

    Wharton Conference

    Andrea Bispels and Arielle Brown, both English majors who were taking Ferda Asya's ENGLISH 322 American Realism course last spring, presented papers at “Wharton in Washington 2016 Conference” in Washington, D.C. this summer.

    The Edith Wharton Society holds an international conference once in every three years in the cities where the American author Edith Wharton (1862-1937) lived or which she visited nationally and internationally.

    This is the first time that the organizers invited undergraduate student participation in The Edith Wharton Society Conference. Andrea Bispels’ paper, titled “Emergence of the Independent Woman in Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence,” and Arielle Brown’s paper, titled “The Limits of Newland Archer’s Freedom in Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence,” were two of the eleven undergraduate student papers selected nationally for presentation at the conference."

    Area teachers sharpen STEM skills

    STEM Teacher Academy

    Math and science lessons at several area schools should reach new creative heights this coming school year thanks to Bloomsburg University’s STEM Teacher Academy.

    Nearly 30 teachers — pre-kindergarten through eighth grade — from Mount Carmel, Milton, Benton, Southern Columbia, Lewisburg, Shamokin, and Saint Joseph school districts participated in the two-week academy this summer led by BU’s Regional STEM Education Center.

    Teachers spent the bulk of the academy on campus learning new teaching techniques, as well as refining their own classroom approaches, through strategies such as inquiry-based learning, hybrid learning and design collaborative. The STEM Teacher Academy was coordinated through the Math and Science Partnership Grant with the Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit.

    “This is a two-year grant, and we anticipate having 50-plus teachers participate next year,” said Kim Bolig, BU’s STEM director. “The grant was very competitive, and we are very fortunate that our proposal was fully awarded.”

    SVURS winners announced

    SVURS Winners

    Awards were presented in four categories to conclude the sixth annual Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium on Wednesday, July 27, at Bloomsburg University. More than 100 students representing Bloomsburg, Bucknell, Susquehanna and Lafayette universities and Geisinger Health System participated in the symposium. Sponsors were BU, Bucknell University and the Geisinger Center for Health Research.

    Outstanding abstract competition and speakers

    • Biological Sciences: “Dissecting an Interaction Between the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) and the Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) in Human Malignant Melanoma,” Mark R. Drumm, Ashley L. Wagner, Ellen M. Kehres and Michael G. Borland, Bloomsburg University.
    • Clinical and Translational Research: “Expression and Analysis of Human GPRC6A Variants,” Geisinger Health System.
    • Natural Sciences and Engineering: “The Comfort Quandary: Do people really trust algorithms that preserve their privacy online?” Bucknell University.
    • Social Sciences and Humanities: “A Geovisualization: 10,000 Years of Global Maize,” Bucknell University.

    Outstanding poster presentations

    • Biological Sciences: “Development of an Automated Algorithm for Sequencing Data to Identify Candidate Genes for Developmental Brain Disorders in Recurrent Copy Number Variants,” Geisinger Health System.
    • Clinical and Translational Research: “Sarcopenia Predicts Poor Outcomes in Urgent Exploratory Laparotomy,” Geisinger Health System.
    • Natural Sciences and Engineering: “Quantification of the Spatial Extent and Water Quality Improvement Functions of Alluvial River Islands in the North Branch Susquehanna River Basin,” Daniel J. Steinhauser, Bloomsburg University.
    • Social Sciences and Humanities: “Black Women and Violence: Understanding Fear and Movement Amongst Black Women on Bucknell’s Campus,” Amarachi Ekekwe, Bucknell University; and “Dreamers: Immigrant Youth Fighting for Opportunity,” Bucknell University.

    Beta Gamma Sigma named most outstanding chapter

    Beta Gamma Sigma

    Bloomsburg University’s chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma was recently recognized by the Chapter Management System (CMS) with its Highest Honors award for the 2015-2016 academic year. Beta Gamma Sigma is the premier honor society in the field of business, recognizing only those undergraduate (juniors and seniors only) and graduate business students who rank among the highest GPAs at their institution.

    "This status is indicative of a campus where academic excellence is valued and where the faculty officers of the chapter work diligently to enhance Beta Gamma Sigma’s stature on campus," said Denise M. Cage, senior manager, Collegiate Chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma.

    As a Highest Honors Chapter, the chapter now qualifies for:

    • one Leadership Scholarship covering the cost of one student registration, including hotel accommodations, for the 2016 Global Leadership Summit (GLS) in Dallas
    • a nomination for the Outstanding Chapter Award
    • a nomination for the Outstanding Chapter Advisor Award
    • a nomination for the Dean of the Year Award

    At the end of the fall semester, the chapter was awarded the 2015 Outstanding Chapter-Honorable Mention Award for a year where the chapter inducted six faculty, a MBA student, 21 seniors and 43 juniors.

    With that award, the chapter received a $500 scholarship for its members. The chapter was one of two Honorable Mention awardees chosen out of 500-plus collegiate chapters worldwide.

    Beta Gamma Sigma is the honor society serving business programs accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma is the highest recognition a business student anywhere in the world can receive in a business program accredited by AACSB International.

    Byrum elected to College of Fellows

    Kristie Byrum

    Kristie Byrum, assistant professor of mass communications, has been elected to the Public Relations Society of America’s (PRSA) College of Fellows.

    Byrum, who teaches courses in public relations and media law, is receiving the organization’s highest honor in recognition of her significant contributions to the communications profession and outstanding lifetime career achievement. Fewer than 2 percent of PRSA members — only 350 people nationwide — have been accepted into the College of Fellows. Byrum is among 23 public relations professionals who will be recognized at the International Public Relations Society of America conference in October in Indianapolis.

    At BU, Byrum was honored with the university’s Teaching and Learning Enhancement (TALE) Center Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award in May, nominated by students who praised her for providing real-life examples based on her real-world knowledge. During the past year, her students collaborated on projects promoting events in Middleburg through the Greater Susquehanna Valley Chamber of Commerce and assisted member agencies of the Berwick Area United Way with strategic planning.

    Early path to the classroom

    Milton Teacher Practicum

    Gabrielle Meister couldn’t wait to be in front of a classroom.

    It was part of her driving passion to become a teacher. After three years of lectures and observing classrooms, this Bloomsburg University early childhood and special education major decided enough was enough. This summer, it was time for her to teach.

    Meister was among 22 education majors to participate in a three-week Milton Teaching Practicum in the Milton Area School District earlier this summer. It’s one of five practicum options College of Education students can choose from to get classroom experience prior to student teaching.

    “When you’re first getting up in front of the classroom — even as young as kindergarten — you get very nervous,” Meister says. “The first time it was nerve-racking. By the third time, I got better at it. I’m now 100 percent more comfortable heading (forward). Student teaching is going to be amazing.”

    Pre-Election Programming

    Unleash Your Vote

    Several departments, across multiple divisions at Bloomsburg University have been working on a long slate of programs to allow students to easily register to vote as well as learn about the various issues that are part of this year’s political season. Please support these efforts from now until the General Election on Nov. 8 by sending students, encouraging friends and neighbors to come to public events designed to enlighten voters and by you attending, too.

  • Oct. 4 – US 11th District Representative Town Hall with Mayor Marsicano, 7:30 p.m., KUB Ballroom, followed by the Vice Presidential debate on television at 9 p.m.
  • Oct. 10 – NY Times Columnist Nicholas Kristof, 7 p.m., Gross Auditorium.
  • Oct. 14 – Students Mobilizing Students: Civic Engagement and Professional Development Alumni Panel (multiple participants), 2 p.m., McCormick Center 2303.
  • Oct. 18 – Donna Brazille, Mitrani Hal, Haas Auditorium. Author, political analyst and Chairperson of the Democratic National Committee will speak.
  • Oct. 19 – Final Presidential Debate, 9 p.m. KUB Ballroom. The final Presidential debate will be shown and afterward discussion and analysis will be part of the event, led by the communication studies department’s David Heineman.
  • Oct. 20 – Barzan, 7 p.m., McCormick Center 2303. The film discusses how a childhood nickname led to the investigation of an innocent Iraqi immigrant because that name was shared by an Al-Qaida operative and so he was linked to the terrorist group in the 9/11 Commission Report.
  • Oct. 24 – Heist & PRICELE$$, KUB Multipurpose, 7 p.m. Heist is an examination of the financial system. PRICELE$$ is a non-partisan film about money and political influence. Hosted by Chris Hallenbrook from BU’s political science department who will add perspective to each film, field questions and offer comments.
  • Oct. 25 – Dear President Obama, Kuster Auditorium, 7 p.m. Examination of the oil and gas industry that urges the president and legislators to take action during the lame duck period. With emphasis on how climate change disproportionately affects people who already fight poverty and hunger, sociologist, Chris Podeschi will lead a discussion.
  • Nov. 1 – The Best Place to BU?: A conversation on race and politics in Bloomsburg, KUB Multicultural Center, 6 p.m. A panel discussion with faculty and students on issues of race at the university and in the town and the role of race in the 2016 political season.
  • Nov. 2 – Panel: Religion and this Political Season. Representatives from the Islamic and Jewish faiths will be joined by a Catholic priest and Protestant minister for an interfaith dialog about religion, politics and intolerance in this election season.
  • Nov. 3 – Divide in Concord, Kuster Auditorium, 7 p.m. A documentary about an 80-year-old woman who attempts to create a local ordinance to ban water for sale in disposal bottles. A discussion of the importance of politics at the local level will be led in conjunction with the film by Bloomsburg’s former mayor, Dan Knorr.
  • Faculty Sabbaticals

    Carver Hall

    The following sabbaticals have been granted for the upcoming Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 semesters:

      S. Ekema Agbaw, English, Spring 2018
      Kristen Brubaker, Biological and Allied Health Sciences, Spring 2018 and Fall 2018
      Naz Fallahian, Physics and Engineering Technology, Summers 2017 and 2018
      Kevin Ferland, Mathematical and Digital Sciences, Fall 2017
      Andrea Fradkin, Exercise Science, Fall 2017
      Victoria Geyfman, Finance, Spring 2018
      Christian Grandzol, Management, Fall 2017
      Nathaniel Greene, Physics and Engineering Technology, Fall 2017 and Spring 2018
      Meredith Grimsley, Art and Art History, Fall 2017 and Spring 2018
      Carl Hansen, Biological and Allied Health Sciences, Fall 2017 and Spring 2018
      Sybil Holloway, Psychological Counseling, Counseling, and Human Development, Fall 2017 and Spring 2018
      John Hranitz, Biological and Allied Health Sciences, Fall 2017 and Spring 2018
      Vincent Hron, Art and Art History, Fall 2017
      Jennifer Johnson, Psychology, Spring 2018
      Eric Kahn, Mathematical and Digital Sciences, Spring 2018
      Julie Petry, Music, Theatre, and Dance, Fall 2017
      Christopher Podeschi, Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice, Fall 2017
      Biswajit Ray, Physics and Engineering Technology, Summers 2017 and 2018
      Theodore Roggenbuck, English, Spring 2018
      Sabah Salih, English, Spring 2018
      A. Blair Staley, Accounting, Spring 2018
      Deborah Stryker, Exceptionality Programs, Fall 2017
      John Waggoner, Psychology, Fall 2017

    COLA's salute to excellence

    Dean's Salute to Excellence

    James Brown, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, recently presented the Dean’s Salute to Excellence award to four professors at the annual College of Liberal Art’s College-Wide Meeting.

    The Dean’s Salute to Excellence award was created in 1998 by Dean Hsien-Tung Liu to recognize professors with outstanding distinction in teaching, professional responsibilities, scholarship, and service. Since then, the college has recognized a few select faculty members each year for their achievements. The following professors were honored for this year’s award:

    • Mary Katherine Duncan, professor of psychology, Joan and Fred Miller Professor of Good Work, recently completed her fifteenth year at Bloomsburg University. She received the 2015 TALE Outstanding Teacher Award and is a conscientious and effective advisor. Duncan has also been active as a scholar, serving as first author on two peer-reviewed articles during the last five years and offering many presentations at national and regional conferences, most in collaboration with undergraduate student researchers.
    • Jason Genovese, associate professor of mass communications, joined 10 years ago. He is a consistently strong classroom and studio instructor, and he is an effective mentor to students in the program. Genovese brought to Bloomsburg University nearly a decade of television industry experience, and he maintains currency with the ever-changing technological innovations in video production.
    • Gifford Howarth, professor of music, has also been a part of the College of Liberal Arts for the past ten years. As a member of the department of Music, Theatre, and Dance, Howarth teaches percussion and directs the Maroon and Gold Band. Howarth is a sought-after adjudicator and clinician of international reputation.
    • Vincent Hron, professor of art and art history, during his 20 years of service to the university he is consistently recognized as a highly effective instructor. He’s known for giving constructive and supportive critical feedback to aspiring artists, meeting the students where they are developmentally and helping reach the next level in their ability to express themselves on the canvas. As chairperson, he recently led the department through a successful re-accreditation process, and he is a valuable member of the college’s leadership team.

    Phi Beta Lambda showcase talents at national conference

    Phi Beta Lambda

    Twenty-three Bloomsburg University students attended the Phi Beta Lambda-Future Business Leaders of America National Leadership Conference in Atlanta this summer.

    During the conference, students attended many professional development sessions. They also competed in the competitive events portion of the conference. To qualify to compete at the conference, they were required to place either first or second at the state-level competition.

    In these competitions, students were provided with a case study that they had to research and present to a panel of judges. Speaking to many of the judges and advisors from across the country, the competition was one of the most competitive in recent years, and included many top-rated institutions across the United States.

    National Leadership Conference Winners

    • Third Place — Accounting for Professionals: Erin Ditro
    • Third Place — Project Management: Grace Rogers
    • Fourth Place — Management Analysis & Decision Making: Courtney Kane, Jacob Wilcox, and Joshua Matz
    • Sixth Place — Marketing Analysis and Decision Making: Samantha Wetzel, Matthew Starcher, and Evan Simpson
    • Seventh Place — Forensic Accounting: Brinley Fromm and Clare Rowley
    • Seventh Place — Economic Analysis and Decision Making: Geoff Matz, Jacob Mosebrook, and Joseph Kinek
    • Seventh Place — Human Resource Management: Raquel Strauss, Kennedy Barner, and Edward Fetterman
    • Seventh Place — Accounting Analysis and Decision Making: Miranda Silfee, Pietro Colella, and Ryan Kassees

    “They simply could not have done it without the hard work of the faculty and staff of the College of Business,” Todd A. Shawver assistant professor of accounting, faculty advisor of Phi Beta Lambda, said. “Please join me in congratulating the students of Phi Beta Lambda for their great work!”

    ESSE Program wraps up first summer experience

    ESSE Program

    One of Bloomsburg University’s newest summer programs recently concluded its two-week experience, capping a unique outreach opportunity for area Latino high school students.

    The English-Spanish Summer Enrichment (ESSE) Program — among the recent President’s Strategic Planning Grant initiatives — featured students from Berwick, Hazelton, Lancaster and Reading living on campus while attending courses designed to improve their English language skills, as well as nurturing their appreciation for their cultural and linguistic heritage.

    In addition, the ESSE project provided learning and leadership opportunities for BU students spanning majors in English, Teaching and Learning, Spanish, and working with the ESOL Institute.

    The ESSE Program was coordinated through a collaborative effort between the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Department of Teaching and Learning, Department of English, Department of Languages and Cultures, Office of Admissions, ESOL Institute and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    This summer, 25 Latino high school students from Hazleton and Lancaster participated in the English Spanish Summer Enrichment Program. The program, which was funded through a SPARC grant, gave students the opportunity to study ESL, U.S. Latino Literature, and Spanish for Heritage speakers while learning more about college life and Bloomsburg University. Undergraduates learned by serving as teaching assistants and residence advisors in the program.

    Allentown Project provides pathway to college

    Allentown Pathways Project

    From interactive presentations to hands-on learning activities to living in dorms, a group of rising seniors from Allentown School District got quite the taste of Husky Life over the last two weeks.

    Their summer campus experience was made possible by the Allentown Educational Pathways Project, an annual two-week residential program designed to excite and prepare high school students for college.

    BU students are key components to the partnership serving as program assistants — many of whom participated in the Allentown Project themselves — mentoring the high-schoolers throughout the experience to include their time in the dorms and in between academic activities. The mentors are trained prior to address basic health and safety issues, personal growth and to promote friendship among the entire group.

    Among the hands-on academic activities included learning how to use the scientific method, understanding microscope theory and acquiring basic microscope skills, and exploring Mendelian genetics and the principles of inheritance, according to Angela Hess, associate professor of biology. In addition, Hess said the Allentown students learned about anatomical terminology and mammalian organ systems, as well as being engaged in a medically related research project. This, according to Hess, culminated in a poster presentation to their program assistants.

    BOG approves contract extension for President Soltz

    David L. Soltz

    The Board of Governors of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education announced a contract extension for Bloomsburg University President David L. Soltz, during its quarterly meeting on July 14. The board approved the extension through June 30, 2019.

    Soltz became BU’s 18th president in January 2008. This is the eighth contract extension since his arrival. Soltz currently is the longest-serving president in the State System.

    Since his inauguration, Soltz has led BU through a successful strategic plan. He has overseen the establishment of numerous academic programs and initiatives, including the creation of MyCore, BU’s new general education program, Center for Supply Chain Management, BU’s Institute for Concussion Research and Services, Professional U initiative, Zeigler Institute of Professional Development, McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support, Center for Visual and Performing Arts, Center for Leadership and Engagement, Center for Healthy Aging and Center for Earth and Environmental Studies. Additionally, he established the university’s first official presence in downtown Bloomsburg with the creation of the Greenly Center.

    Under his leadership, Bloomsburg is nearing the successful completion of the first major fundraising campaign: It’s Personal: The Campaign for Bloomsburg University. Launched in October 2015, the campaign set an initial goal of $50 million. More than $46 million has been raised to date.

    Faculty promotion and and tenure

    Faculty Tenure Promotions

    The following faculty members have been granted promotion effective Fall 2016:

    • Faculty promoted to professor — Kevin Ball, psychology; Nathalie Cornelius, languages and cultures; John Hintz, environmental, geographical, and geological sciences; Claire Lawrence, English; Eric Stouffer, psychology; Mark Tapsak, chemistry and biochemistry
    • Faculty promoted to associate professor — Michael Borland, chemistry and biochemistry; William Coleman, biological and allied health sciences; Monica Favia, management and marketing; Jason Genovese, mass communications; Joseph Hazzard, exercise science; Kathleen Heitzman, athletics; Mary King, communication studies; Michael McFarland, athletics; Matthew Slotkin, music, theatre and dance
    • Faculty promoted to assistant professor — Tara Diehl, academic enrichment

    The following faculty members have been granted tenure effective Fall 2016:

    • Michael Borland, chemistry and biochemistry
    • Kimberly Cardimona, audiology and speech pathology
    • William Coleman, biological and allied health sciences
    • Michael McFarland, athletics
    • Matthew Slotkin, music, theatre and dance

    EGGS group heads to the field

    EGGS Field Study

    Their textbook will be Lake Michigan.

    And for the group of Bloomsburg University students who will be spending two weeks in the field exploring different geoscience and environmental aspects of the Michigan Basin, they wouldn’t want it any other way.

    The unique summer course, Special Topics in Geology, is being led by faculty Matt Ricker, Jen Whisner and Chris Whisner, of the Department of Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences faculty. During their two-week field experience students will learn field study techniques and how to analyze field observations that will culminate in student-directed field presentations.

    Some of the topics students will cover include dune wetlands, glaciation and deglaciation, groundwater pollution, iron and copper deposits, water management for wildlife, tar sands pipelines, and pumped storage plants. Among the field site locations will be Indiana Dune National Lakeshore, J.T. Wells State Park, McLain State Park, Munising Tourist Park, Tahquamenon Falls State Park, Straight State Park, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore and Yankee Springs State Recreation Area.

    Act 101 to hold Black Lives Matter rally

    Black Lives Matter

    In coordination with the Office of Minority Affairs, Act 101/EOP will hold a Black Lives Matter event on Wednesday, July 27 with a peaceful march on campus, a moment of silence and a presentation featuring speakers.

    The march will begin at 5 p.m. at Carver Hall, leading up through lower campus to the Academic Quad. A moment of silence will be held prior to the presentation of speakers at 5:30 p.m. in McCormick Center 1303. Among the speakers include the Coalition for Social Equity and Bob Moschgat, assistant professor of criminal justice.

    To participate in the march, meet at Carver Hall or contact Act 101 at 570-389-4492.

    BU hosts research symposium

    Undergraduate Research

    The sixth annual Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium (SVURS) will be held Wednesday, July 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Kehr Union. The symposium is sponsored jointly by Bloomsburg University, Bucknell University and the Geisinger Center for Health Research.

    This year’s keynote speaker is Jennifer K. Wagner, associate director of bioethics research at Geisinger Health System. A practicing attorney specializing in genetics rights, Wagner was an American Association for the Advancement of Science Congressional Fellow.

    During the symposium, undergraduates will present their scholarship during a poster session, and awards will be presented for outstanding submissions. Abstracts are judged in the social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering, biological sciences and clinical/translational.

    Phi Beta Lambda showcase talents at national conference

    Phi Beta Lambda

    Twenty-three Bloomsburg University students attended the Phi Beta Lambda-Future Business Leaders of America National Leadership Conference in Atlanta this summer.

    During the conference, students attended many professional development sessions. They also competed in the competitive events portion of the conference. To qualify to compete at the conference, they were required to place either first or second at the state-level competition.

    In these competitions, students were provided with a case study that they had to research and present to a panel of judges. Speaking to many of the judges and advisors from across the country, the competition was one of the most competitive in recent years, and included many top-rated institutions across the United States.

    National Leadership Conference Winners

    • Third Place — Accounting for Professionals: Erin Ditro
    • Third Place — Project Management: Grace Rogers
    • Fourth Place — Management Analysis & Decision Making: Courtney Kane, Jacob Wilcox, and Joshua Matz
    • Sixth Place — Marketing Analysis and Decision Making: Samantha Wetzel, Matthew Starcher, and Evan Simpson
    • Seventh Place — Forensic Accounting: Brinley Fromm and Clare Rowley
    • Seventh Place — Economic Analysis and Decision Making: Geoff Matz, Jacob Mosebrook, and Joseph Kinek
    • Seventh Place — Human Resource Management: Raquel Strauss, Kennedy Barner, and Edward Fetterman
    • Seventh Place — Accounting Analysis and Decision Making: Miranda Silfee, Pietro Colella, and Ryan Kassees

    “They simply could not have done it without the hard work of the faculty and staff of the College of Business,” Todd A. Shawver assistant professor of accounting, faculty advisor of Phi Beta Lambda, said. “Please join me in congratulating the students of Phi Beta Lambda for their great work!”

    BOG approves contract extension for President Soltz

    David L. Soltz

    The Board of Governors of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education announced a contract extension for Bloomsburg University President David L. Soltz, during its quarterly meeting on July 14. The board approved the extension through June 30, 2019.

    Soltz became BU’s 18th president in January 2008. This is the eighth contract extension since his arrival. Soltz currently is the longest-serving president in the State System.

    Since his inauguration, Soltz has led BU through a successful strategic plan. He has overseen the establishment of numerous academic programs and initiatives, including the creation of MyCore, BU’s new general education program, Center for Supply Chain Management, BU’s Institute for Concussion Research and Services, Professional U initiative, Zeigler Institute of Professional Development, McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support, Center for Visual and Performing Arts, Center for Leadership and Engagement, Center for Healthy Aging and Center for Earth and Environmental Studies. Additionally, he established the university’s first official presence in downtown Bloomsburg with the creation of the Greenly Center.

    Under his leadership, Bloomsburg is nearing the successful completion of the first major fundraising campaign: It’s Personal: The Campaign for Bloomsburg University. Launched in October 2015, the campaign set an initial goal of $50 million. More than $46 million has been raised to date.

    Board of Governors approves tuition increase

    Pell Grant Program

    Continuing efforts by the universities to contain their costs, combined with a second straight year of increased investment by the Commonwealth, helped enable the Board of Governors of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education to approve the smallest percentage tuition increase in more than a decade.

    The $89-per-semester increase approved today by the Board for the 2016-17 academic year will set the base tuition rate for most full-time Pennsylvania residents—who comprise about 90 percent of all State System students—at $3,619 per semester, or $7,238 for the full year. Even with the modest increase, the State System universities will remain the lowest-cost option among all four-year colleges and universities in the state.

    The 14 State System universities have eliminated nearly $300 million in expenditures from their combined operating budgets over the last decade in order to balance their budgets and to help hold down student costs. The Commonwealth, meanwhile, has boosted funding to the State System by about $31.5 million over the last two years, after seven straight years of flat or reduced general fund appropriations.

    Nonresident, undergraduate tuition also will increase by 2.5 percent and will range from $10,858 to $18,096 for the 2016-17 academic year. The technology fee will be $448 for full-time resident students, and $682 for full-time nonresidents. The resident, graduate tuition rate will be $483 per credit, an increase of $13. The nonresident, graduate tuition rate will increase by $20 per credit, to $725.

    Faculty promotion and and tenure

    Faculty Tenure Promotions

    The following faculty members have been granted promotion effective Fall 2016:

    • Faculty promoted to professor — Kevin Ball, psychology; Nathalie Cornelius, languages and cultures; John Hintz, environmental, geographical, and geological sciences; Claire Lawrence, English; Eric Stouffer, psychology; Mark Tapsak, chemistry and biochemistry
    • Faculty promoted to associate professor — Michael Borland, chemistry and biochemistry; William Coleman, biological and allied health sciences; Monica Favia, management and marketing; Jason Genovese, mass communications; Joseph Hazzard, exercise science; Kathleen Heitzman, athletics; Mary King, communication studies; Michael McFarland, athletics; Matthew Slotkin, music, theatre and dance
    • Faculty promoted to assistant professor — Tara Diehl, academic enrichment

    The following faculty members have been granted tenure effective Fall 2016:

    • Michael Borland, chemistry and biochemistry
    • Kimberly Cardimona, audiology and speech pathology
    • William Coleman, biological and allied health sciences
    • Michael McFarland, athletics
    • Matthew Slotkin, music, theatre and dance

    EGGS group continues field study

    Lake Michigan Field Study

    Their textbook is Lake Michigan.

    And for the group of Bloomsburg University students who are spending two weeks in the field exploring different geoscience and environmental aspects of the Michigan Basin, they wouldn’t want it any other way.

    The unique summer course, Special Topics in Geology, is being led by faculty Matt Ricker, Jen Whisner and Chris Whisner, of the Department of Environmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences faculty. During their two-week field experience students are learning field study techniques and how to analyze field observations that will culminate in student-directed field presentations.

    "Some things we’ve been doing. By today, (Day 6) we’re running like a well-oiled machine — the students know how to work together to put up and take down camp, divide up the dish washing, cook potatoes in the fire for dinner, set up and put away lunch, etc. They’ve discovered the joy of soils (there’s a lot more information below your feet than you might think!) and started to get a feel for how soils develop on different parent materials and in different climates (It’s a LOT colder in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan!)."

    Scholarships deliver study abroad

    China Study Abroad

    Anastasia Timofeeva, a junior engineering and Chinese major, is wrapping up her studying abroad in China at the Beijing Foreign Studies University, courtesy of several scholarships earned this past year.

    Timofeeva received a Professional Experience grant from Professional U, a grant that has been designed for students seeking to get involved in their career path or learn more about the world. She also received an International Faculty Association scholarship dedicated to students with interest in fostering globalism and internationalism on campus and the community. Moreover, she received College of Liberal Arts study abroad scholarship and one for good academic standing from the university.

    • First impressions of China"Just yesterday our history professor took us on a trip to the Tiannamen square and told us about the different stages of the palace during each dynasty’s rule. I cannot wait for many more trips we will have with IES to other historic places."
    • 17 days in Beijing"It was about a 30-minute hike up the very steep stairs. I did not expect to be as difficult as it was, but everybody in our group made it up to the Wall. Seeing the mountains surround the Great Wall was one of the most beautiful scenic spots I have ever experienced."
    • Traveling in China"Just last weekend our whole program traveled to Xian for four days. One of my favorite parts about the trip was a 13-hour overnight train ride. Since we came as a big group, it was really fun to just play card games and talk."

    Allentown Project provides pathway to college

    Allentown Pathways Project

    From interactive presentations to hands-on learning activities to living in dorms, a group of rising seniors from Allentown School District got quite the taste of Husky Life over the last two weeks.

    Their summer campus experience was made possible by the Allentown Educational Pathways Project, an annual two-week residential program designed to excite and prepare high school students for college.

    BU students are key components to the partnership serving as program assistants — many of whom participated in the Allentown Project themselves — mentoring the high-schoolers throughout the experience to include their time in the dorms and in between academic activities. The mentors are trained prior to address basic health and safety issues, personal growth and to promote friendship among the entire group.

    Among the hands-on academic activities included learning how to use the scientific method, understanding microscope theory and acquiring basic microscope skills, and exploring Mendelian genetics and the principles of inheritance, according to Angela Hess, associate professor of biology. In addition, Hess said the Allentown students learned about anatomical terminology and mammalian organ systems, as well as being engaged in a medically related research project. This, according to Hess, culminated in a poster presentation to their program assistants.

    ESSE Program wraps up first summer experience

    ESSE Summer Progam

    One of Bloomsburg University’s newest summer programs recently concluded its two-week experience, capping a unique outreach opportunity for area Latino high school students.

    The English-Spanish Summer Enrichment (ESSE) Program — among the recent President’s Strategic Planning Grant initiatives — featured students from Berwick, Hazelton, Lancaster and Reading living on campus while attending courses designed to improve their English language skills, as well as nurturing their appreciation for their cultural and linguistic heritage.

    In addition, the ESSE project provided learning and leadership opportunities for BU students spanning majors in English, Teaching and Learning, Spanish, and working with the ESOL Institute.

    The ESSE Program was coordinated through a collaborative effort between the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Department of Teaching and Learning, Department of English, Department of Languages and Cultures, Office of Admissions, ESOL Institute and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    Anthropology scholar finishes field research in Mexico

    Lydia Stebbins

    Lydia Stebbins, an anthropology and French major who is pursuing a minor in Spanish and Latin American Studies, is the 2016 recipient of the Wymer and Warner Scholarship in anthropology.

    Stebbins will apply the scholarship to her summer 2016 URSCA supported ethnographic research in Xalapa, Mexico, where she will be studying Spanish and Mexican culture and history at the Universidad Veracruzana-Xalapa.

    Her ethnographic research focuses on the impact of socioeconomic globalization on local markets in Mexico. She will investigate local perceptions of the effects of global supermarkets on traditional markets, the economy, health, and culture.

    While in Mexico, she will also tour archaeological ruins, participate in the Cultural Immersion Program, and take a course on traditional Mexican cooking.

    • In the City of Flowers“Two weeks in, and I have been greatly enjoying my experiences, and there's still so much more to come! Xalapa has proved to be a very welcoming city, full of art and culture and beauty with a mix of new and old colonization era architecture. Who knows what will happen next!”
    • Experiencing the local markets"Last weekend I had the opportunity to visit and observe three local markets spread across the city of Xalapa, and it was fascinating. I have visited quite a number of farmers markets in Pennsylvania, but this was something quite different."
    • Exchanging the City for a bit of Country"Pueblos Mágicos are designations for any culturally important, historic or naturally beautiful town in Mexico. Translated, these towns are called magic towns and between my research work I had the opportunity to visit two of these nearby wonders; Xico and Coatapec.”
    • What I learned in Xalapa"I was given the opportunity to experience a new culture, learn a new lifestyle, enjoy new foods and explore new places. Through the wonderful Spanish classes offered through the EEE I was able to practice and expand my language abilities and after such a short time I feel I've made leaps in the language!”

    A millennial approach to argumentative writing

    Thick Tweet Research

    There’s a common understanding among writing teachers of how difficult it can be to present theories of argumentative writing to students in approachable, applicable ways. Ashley Muchler has seen this first-hand and as a future high school teacher, knows she will face this hurdle on the other side of the classroom. So in true millennial fashion, she took to social media.

    For the past year the secondary education and English major has been researching approaches to argumentative writing in language arts classrooms. Her research — in collaboration with Timothy Oleksiak, assistant professor of English — has focused on using Twitter to teach argumentative writing.

    This particular topic struck Muchler’s interest when she took English 306: Theory and Practice for Writing with Oleksiak. The class looked at theories of writing instruction and putting these theories into practice.

    Allentown Project provides pathway to college

    Allentown Pathways Project

    From interactive presentations to hands-on learning activities to living in dorms, a group of rising seniors from Allentown School District got quite the taste of Husky Life over the last two weeks.

    Their summer campus experience was made possible by the Allentown Educational Pathways Project, an annual two-week residential program designed to excite and prepare high school students for college.

    BU students are key components to the partnership serving as program assistants — many of whom participated in the Allentown Project themselves — mentoring the high-schoolers throughout the experience to include their time in the dorms and in between academic activities. The mentors are trained prior to address basic health and safety issues, personal growth and to promote friendship among the entire group.

    Among the hands-on academic activities included learning how to use the scientific method, understanding microscope theory and acquiring basic microscope skills, and exploring Mendelian genetics and the principles of inheritance, according to Angela Hess, associate professor of biology. In addition, Hess said the Allentown students learned about anatomical terminology and mammalian organ systems, as well as being engaged in a medically related research project. This, according to Hess, culminated in a poster presentation to their program assistants.

    ESSE Program wraps up first summer experience

    ESSE Summer Progam

    One of Bloomsburg University’s newest summer programs recently concluded its two-week experience, capping a unique outreach opportunity for area Latino high school students.

    The English-Spanish Summer Enrichment (ESSE) Program — among the recent President’s Strategic Planning Grant initiatives — featured students from Berwick, Hazelton, Lancaster and Reading living on campus while attending courses designed to improve their English language skills, as well as nurturing their appreciation for their cultural and linguistic heritage.

    In addition, the ESSE project provided learning and leadership opportunities for BU students spanning majors in English, Teaching and Learning, Spanish, and working with the ESOL Institute.

    The ESSE Program was coordinated through a collaborative effort between the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Department of Teaching and Learning, Department of English, Department of Languages and Cultures, Office of Admissions, ESOL Institute and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    Scholarships deliver study abroad in China

    Anastasia Timofeeva

    Anastasia Timofeeva, a junior engineering and Chinese major, is studying abroad in China at the Beijing Foreign Studies University this summer, courtesy of several scholarships earned this past year.

    Timofeeva received a Professional Experience grant from Professional U, a grant that has been designed for students seeking to get involved in their career path or learn more about the world. She also received an International Faculty Association scholarship dedicated to students with interest in fostering globalism and internationalism on campus and the community. Moreover, she received College of Liberal Arts study abroad scholarship and one for good academic standing from the university.

    • First impressions of China"Just yesterday our history professor took us on a trip to the Tiannamen square and told us about the different stages of the palace during each dynasty’s rule. I cannot wait for many more trips we will have with IES to other historic places."
    • 17 days in Beijing"It was about a 30-minute hike up the very steep stairs. I did not expect to be as difficult as it was, but everybody in our group made it up to the Wall. Seeing the mountains surround the Great Wall was one of the most beautiful scenic spots I have ever experienced."

    Concussion research progresses

    Biomarker Research

    As Bloomsburg University’s role in a nationwide concussion study continues this summer, related research on campus stemming from the spring has set the stage for a potential key discovery.

    Tim Shuey, a post-baccalaureate student completing his preparation for medical school, worked with Toni Bell, professor of chemistry, on providing a biochemical approach to concussion research for BU’s Institute for Concussion Research and Services.

    Their specific project — among the recent President’s Strategic Planning Grant initiatives — seeks a biomarker that can be developed into a reliable, easy-to-use test for mild traumatic brain injury.

    Although Shuey begins medical school in August, Bell said their biomarker research will continue this fall with the help of two current biology majors, Andrew Denisenko and Diane Cruz.

    The "Great STEM Adventure"

    More than 250 area students from elementary to high school spanning seven school districts explored science, technology, engineering and math at Bloomsburg University’s annual The Great STEM Adventure Camps through a series of activities led by BU students, faculty and invited presenters.

    The week-long experience featured three different camps.

    • Explorers — fifth and sixth grade — explored their environments with hands-on fun with rocks, geography and learned how to use data loggers to examine chlorophyll and photosynthesis with plants in the field or lab
    • Investigators — seventh and eighth grade — used science and math skills to investigate the world from DNA fingerprinting and brain waves to environmental biology
    • Innovators — ninth and 10th grade — discovered the use computers to investigate crimes, create programming and decode encryptions

    COST student earns top honor at national convention

    Jean-Nicole Place

    Jean-Nicole Place, a biology major and chemistry minor, recently earned the John C. Johnson Award for the best research poster at the National Biennial Convention of Beta Beta Beta Biology Honor Society at Bethel University in Saint Paul, Minn.

    Her research “Methylation of GNG7 in Human Breast Cancer” was presented in the cell, organismal and developmental biology category.

    Place qualified for the national convention after placing first this past spring at the Northeast District Convention in March at Ursinus College. Her research was conducted in the laboratory of William Schwindinger, assistant professor of biological and health sciences, and was funded by an URSCA award.

    Place served as secretary of BU’s chapter of TriBeta and was a student secretary in the Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences in the College of Science and Technology this past year.

    Freshman one of 25 to earn PA Society Scholarship

    Ashley Kline

    The Pennsylvania Society Scholarship Program with the Maguire Foundation is pleased to announce that Amanda Kline has been selected as one of the 25 inaugural recipients. Kline will receive an annually renewable $8,000 scholarship for four years of undergraduate study at Bloomsburg University.

    Amanda Kline was selected from over 1,000 applicants in the first year of the scholarship competition. Each scholarship recipient needed to be a senior at a high school in Pennsylvania. A recipient must have enrolled in a four-year accredited college in Pennsylvania, have a 3.0 or higher grade average, and have demonstrated financial need and a commitment to serve the community. All Pennsylvania Society Scholarship winners are required to complete 9 credits of study in history, civics, and/or government studies.

    In its first year, The Pennsylvania Society and the Maguire Foundation have offered $200,000 in scholarship awards for Pennsylvania high school students to attend college in Pennsylvania, enriching the strength of the talent pool in the Commonwealth.

    Provost serves AASCU Task Force on Teacher Education

    AASCU Task Force

    The June meeting an engaging and honest conversation about the public critique and possibilities of teacher preparation at AASCU institutions, HEA reauthorization and the appropriate federal role. The meeting will serve as the basis for the design and implementation of two separate survey instruments by the American Institutes for Research (AIR). One instrument will survey AASCU presidents and provosts and the other will survey education deans at AASCU institutions.

    The task force consists of 10 to 12 individuals (presidents, provosts, program experts and thought leaders). A final report, to be written by AIR and released at AASCU’s Annual Meeting in October, will include three areas of focus:

    • Assessing the state of teacher preparation at AASCU institutions
    • Showcasing innovations and successes of teacher preparation at AASCU institutions
    • Highlighting the roles of AASCU presidents and provosts in strengthening and supporting teacher preparation programs for an increasingly diverse PK-12 student body

    The task force will convene online in late summer to review survey results and analysis and a final draft of the report.

    Trustees OK buildings, grounds

    Trustees Facilities Review

    BU’s Council of Trustees approved a resolution at the June 15 quarterly meeting commending the condition and care of the university’s buildings and grounds.

    Prior to the meeting, the Trustees conducted their annual inspection of facilities, visiting locations of recent or future projects: the University Store and Husky Lounge in Kehr Union, steam plan, Centennial Hall, Upper Campus athletic fields, residence hall construction site and the location of the planned cooling district. Their approval will be shared with the Board of Governors of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education.

    Also during the meeting, the Trustees:

    • OK’d moving forward with an application to the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board for a Performing Arts Venue Liquor License for Haas Center for the Arts.
    • Recognized three retirees with non-instructional emeritus status: Evanna Nolte, procurement, 40 years of service; Dan Pitonyak, university police, 30 years of service; and Dolores Sponseller, payroll, 35 years of service.
    • Accepted the nominating committee’s recommendation to return the current slate of officers for 2016 to 2018: Patrick Wilson, chair; Mary Jane Bowes, vice chair; and Nancy Vasta, secretary.

    Faculty group attend Lilly Conference

    Lilly Conference

    Ten Bloomsburg University faculty recently attended the 2016 International Lilly Conference in Bethesta, Md. Faculty attendance to the conference was sponsored by the TALE Center.

    Lilly-Bethesda was part of the overall Lilly Conference Series. For 35 years, Lilly Conferences on College and University Teaching and Learning have provided opportunities for the presentation of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Faculty and administrators at various stages in their academic careers come from across the United States, representing nearly every discipline found in higher education.

    (L-R) Sharlene Gillman, Shelley Scarpino, Anne Stuart, Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesús, Theodore Roggenbuck, Marianna Wood, Kelly Roth, Beth Rogowsky, Regina Bobak, and Angela La Valley.

    Here comes the Class of 2020

    Bloomsburg University's newest freshman class arrives on campus this week, starting with Preview Days for the incoming fall freshmen. They will spend the day learning about college life, exploring campus and student activities offered in the fall, as well as meet with their college dean and get peer advice from orientation workshop leaders.

    This weekend, freshmen students coming for the summer program move in to begin their four-week session on campus.

    Summer Start and Act 101 students will spend next month getting an early taste of college while preparing for a successful transition in the fall.

    CAT team heads to West Point

    Concussion Study

    Bloomsburg University has begun its role in a nationwide study with the NCAA on concussions with a key part being played by its clinical athletic training students, giving them a gratifying glimpse into their future career field.

    My involvement with the national concussion study has been a great way to expand my knowledge on concussions in general,” said Amanda Shadle, pursuing a M.S. in clinical athletic training. “With head injuries causing so many problems within the athletic field today, research is absolutely necessary to protect these athletes and help them to the road of a speedy recovery.”

    A team led by Joseph Hazzard, director of BU’s Institute for Concussion Research and Service and its clinical athletic training education program, recently spent a week at the United States Military Academy in West Point, N.Y, assisting baseline testing of cadets. The concussion screenings are the initial data point for this summer’s phase of the NCAA-Department of Defense Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (C.A.R.E.) Consortium.

    The study, now in its third year, includes 30 schools nationwide.

    “Our students were active participants in the data collection, which allowed them to transfer knowledge and skills to a real-world experience involving concussion assessment and research data collection,” Hazzard said. “If the Cadets elected to participate in the CARE Consortium research protocol then their de-identified data will become part of the ongoing large data pool generated through this research, and a part of their health record at West Point.”

    Anthropology scholar continues research in Mexico

    Lydia Stebbins

    Lydia Stebbins, an anthropology and French major who is pursuing a minor in Spanish and Latin American Studies, is the 2016 recipient of the Wymer and Warner Scholarship in anthropology.

    Stebbins will apply the scholarship to her summer 2016 URSCA supported ethnographic research in Xalapa, Mexico, where she will be studying Spanish and Mexican culture and history at the Universidad Veracruzana-Xalapa.

    Her ethnographic research focuses on the impact of socioeconomic globalization on local markets in Mexico. She will investigate local perceptions of the effects of global supermarkets on traditional markets, the economy, health, and culture.

    While in Mexico, she will also tour archaeological ruins, participate in the Cultural Immersion Program, and take a course on traditional Mexican cooking.

    In the City of Flowers

    “Two weeks in, and I have been greatly enjoying my experiences, and there's still so much more to come! Xalapa has proved to be a very welcoming city, full of art and culture and beauty with a mix of new and old colonization era architecture. Who knows what will happen next!”

    Experiencing the local markets

    "Last weekend I had the opportunity to visit and observe three local markets spread across the city of Xalapa, and it was fascinating. I have visited quite a number of farmers markets in Pennsylvania, but this was something quite different."

    Scholarships deliver study abroad

    Anastasia Timofeeva

    Anastasia Timofeeva, a junior engineering and Chinese major, is studying abroad in China at the Beijing Foreign Studies University this summer, courtesy of several scholarships earned this past year.

    Timofeeva received a Professional Experience grant from Professional U, a grant that has been designed for students seeking to get involved in their career path or learn more about the world. She also received an International Faculty Association scholarship dedicated to students with interest in fostering globalism and internationalism on campus and the community. Moreover, she received College of Liberal Arts study abroad scholarship and one for good academic standing from the university.

    First impressions of China

    "Just yesterday our history professor took us on a trip to the Tiannamen square and told us about the different stages of the palace during each dynasty’s rule. I cannot wait for many more trips we will have with IES to other historic places."

    COST student earns top honor at national convention

    Jean-Nicole Place

    Jean-Nicole Place, a biology major and chemistry minor, recently earned the John C. Johnson Award for the best research poster at the National Biennial Convention of Beta Beta Beta Biology Honor Society at Bethel University in Saint Paul, Minn.

    Her research “Methylation of GNG7 in Human Breast Cancer” was presented in the cell, organismal and developmental biology category.

    Place qualified for the national convention after placing first this past spring at the Northeast District Convention in March at Ursinus College. Her research was conducted in the laboratory of William Schwindinger, assistant professor of biological and health sciences, and was funded by an URSCA award.

    Place served as secretary of BU’s chapter of TriBeta and was a student secretary in the Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences in the College of Science and Technology this past year.

    Trustees OK buildings, grounds

    Trustees Facilities Review

    BU’s Council of Trustees approved a resolution at the June 15 quarterly meeting commending the condition and care of the university’s buildings and grounds.

    Prior to the meeting, the Trustees conducted their annual inspection of facilities, visiting locations of recent or future projects: the University Store and Husky Lounge in Kehr Union, steam plan, Centennial Hall, Upper Campus athletic fields, residence hall construction site and the location of the planned cooling district. Their approval will be shared with the Board of Governors of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education.

    Also during the meeting, the Trustees:

    • OK’d moving forward with an application to the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board for a Performing Arts Venue Liquor License for Haas Center for the Arts.
    • Recognized three retirees with non-instructional emeritus status: Evanna Nolte, procurement, 40 years of service; Dan Pitonyak, university police, 30 years of service; and Dolores Sponseller, payroll, 35 years of service.
    • Accepted the nominating committee’s recommendation to return the current slate of officers for 2016 to 2018: Patrick Wilson, chair; Mary Jane Bowes, vice chair; and Nancy Vasta, secretary.

    Faculty group attend Lilly Conference

    Lilly Conference

    Ten Bloomsburg University faculty recently attended the 2016 International Lilly Conference in Bethesta, Md. Faculty attendance to the conference was sponsored by the TALE Center.

    Lilly-Bethesda was part of the overall Lilly Conference Series. For 35 years, Lilly Conferences on College and University Teaching and Learning have provided opportunities for the presentation of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Faculty and administrators at various stages in their academic careers come from across the United States, representing nearly every discipline found in higher education.

    (L-R) Sharlene Gillman, Shelley Scarpino, Anne Stuart, Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesús, Theodore Roggenbuck, Marianna Wood, Kelly Roth, Beth Rogowsky, Regina Bobak, and Angela La Valley.

    Students go on Arabic exploration in Morocco

    Arabic Exploration

    A group of Bloomsburg University students are studying different levels of Arabic and its culture at the American Language Institute in Fez, Morocco, this summer. Among them is Elizabeth Miller, a history and Arabic major, who is continuing work on her research of Osama bin Laden’s Radicalization.

    Miller presented her research — “Deciphering Osama bin Laden’s Radicalization based on United States Actions, Policies and Presence in Saudi Arabia 1990-2001” — this spring at the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies Undergraduate Symposium. In addition, she received an Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (URSCA) grant to expand this research following her four-week Arabic study abroad program in Morocco.

    "Today we had our first quiz! It went well, but it’s always difficult to adjust to the way different professors test. Regardless I think it went well for the first quiz, and if not only up from there! But again classes went really well, and I’m really starting to like the intensity of it. It is nice that more Arabic is spoken throughout the class period."

    There are nearly 40 Huskies studying abroad this summer in such locations as Limerick, Ireland; Trier, Germany; London, England; Barcelona, Spain; Beijing, China; Florence, Italy; Lille, France; Heredia, Costa Rica; Granada, Spain; and Xalapa, Mexico.

    How do! Greetings from London

    London Study Abroad

    A group of Bloomsburg University students of varying majors are studying British literature and philosophy in London this summer.

    Among their experiences include seeing “The Taming of the Shrew” at The Globe, tour inside St. Paul’s Cathedral, visit William Shakespeare’s home where they saw a live performance of Hamlet, and traveling to several museums in London, including one where President David Soltz and his wife Robbie were visiting on vacation.

    The group joined the Soltzs on an audio tour on the history of world civilization.

    In addition, several students are continuing work on their Undergraduate, Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity (URSCA) summer projects. Among the projects include a few focused on Virginia Woolf, as well as projects combining history, theory and literature and some on the changing definition of human life — specifically maternal and fetal life, and how these changes capture Foucault’s concept of body discipline and regulation.

    “In order to complete their research, these five students are working at the British Library every day they aren’t busy with class.”

    Student team a finalist in national bank competition

    National Bank Competition

    Bloomsburg University has been named one of 12 finalists in the 2016 Community Bank Case Study Competition, chosen from among 23 student teams from 20 colleges and universities around the country. Team finalists will now move on to the final round of competition judging where the winning team will be announced later this month.

    “Congratulations to the Bloomsburg University team for being named a finalist in the 2016 Community Bank Case Study Competition,” PA Secretary of Banking and Securities Robin L. Wiessmann said. “I am excited to see our students take an interest in community banking. Community banks play an invaluable role in communities across Pennsylvania, and the research from these students will foster even more insight into the impact of community banks on local and regional business and economies.”

    Facilitated by the Conference of State Bank Supervisors (CSBS), the Community Bank Case Study Competition encourages students to explore community banking by partnering student teams with local banks to conduct original case studies. Teams are competing for a chance to win a scholarship and an opportunity to attend the fourth annual CSBS-Federal Reserve Community Banking in the 21st Century Research and Policy Conference in St. Louis. Finalists will have their case studies published during the conference.

    Women's Rugby reaches final of USA Women's Rugby 7s

    Women's Rugby Championships

    Bloomsburg University Women's Club Rugby participated in the USA Rugby 7s Nationals in Cary, N.C., over Memorial Day Weekend competing against nine teams for a national title and No. 1 ranking at WakeMed Soccer Park Field. The ladies finished second to Davenport, which after this weekend ranks them as second in the nation in D2 Women's Rugby. They got to play on live television on The Rugby Channel.

    Game Results

    • BU vs ITHACA 12-10 (W)
    • BU vs UTSA 36-5 (W)
    • BU vs Rutgers 26-5 (W)
    • Davenport 14-24 (L)

    Huskies head to College Rugby Championships

    Bloomsburg University will participate in the renowned Collegiate Rugby Championship this weekend June 3 to 5. The matches will take place at Talen Energy Stadium, Philadelphia, home of Philadelphia Union (MLS). The three-day tournament will have more than 200 matches played showcasing collegiate rugby talent in America! The 2016 Women’s CRC final will be broadcast live on NBS Sports! Get your tickets today!

    Spring 2016: A semester to remember

    Spring Semester Highlights

    Another productive and memorable semester at Bloomsburg University has come to a close. Yet, this spring wasn’t so routine. A collection of academic programs achieved national prominence along with several student groups reaching unprecedented success in fundraising and competition.

    Meanwhile, the tradition of students discovering new levels of advancement, impact and scholarship continued as well.

    • Nursing program tops ratings — Bloomsburg University’s nursing program has been rated first in the commonwealth and 60th in the nation by CollegeAtlas.org
    • Computer Science students assist Geisinger ADHD study — Software Engineering class shifts focus from classroom to Geisinger's research department
    • Professional sales program named among nation’s best — Bloomsburg University is named among the top North American schools in the 2016 Sales Education Foundation’s (SEF) listing of the best universities offering professional sales education
    • History major's research leads to URSCA, study abroad opportunity — Elizabeth Miller received an URSCA grant to expand her research this summer, which will commence after her Arabic study abroad program in Morocco
    • Digital forensics recognized for excellence — Bloomsburg University’s digital forensics program has been designated a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education
    • Local dancers join Koresh Dance Company — Thirteen dancers and an alternate from local studios and Bloomsburg University, ranging in age from 12 to 23, were chosen through audition to perform in the opening number of the Celebrity Artist Series performance
    • Communication Studies class turns project into community campaign — In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, a group of students decided to paint the Town of Bloomsburg teal
    • Nursing students help Montour County with healthy habits — To cap their Public Health and Community work this semester, a group of nursing majors recently helped Montour County become a little healthier
    • Phi Beta Lambda shines at state leadership conference — Nearly 40 business students participated in the Pennsylvania State Phi Beta Lambda Competitive Events held at the Pennsylvania Phi Beta Lambda State Leadership Conference in Harrisburg
    • Record turnout raises $52k for relay — Through the support of 1,138 volunteers making up 62 teams, Bloomsburg University’s Relay for Life event raised more than $52,191 this spring for the American Cancer Society
    • First Breiner Professorship recipient named — Michelle Ficca was selected for the professorship, supported by a gift of $1.9 million from Edward and Julianne (Miller) Breiner, who graduated from BU in 1977
    • Another big day for a big thank you! — Another strong turnout for Community Government Association’s annual The Big Event, which featured roughly 2,000 volunteers this spring working 100-plus job sites
    • Cyber defense team advances in NCCDC — Putting its network, security and hacking skills to test, the Bloomsburg Cyber Defense Club recently reached unprecedented success in the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition against 33 other universities in the Mid-Atlantic Regional qualifier
    • Students respond to Flint water crisis — It is not uncommon for college students to embark on a road trip for spring break. It is, however, when they head away from the beach and in a delivery truck
    • BU first to represent PA in national bank competition — PA Secretary of Banking and Securities Robin L. Wiessmann praised students for being the first to represent Pennsylvania in the national Community Bank Case Study Competition
    • Students, alumni connect for inaugural Career Boot Camp — Bloomsburg University’s CPDCE hosted its first-ever Career Intensive Boot Camp with 50 students participating in a variety workshops to include salary and benefit negotiation, office communication and adapting to change
    • BU joins nationwide concussion study — Bloomsburg University will begin baseline concussion screening of student-athletes this summer after being selected earlier this month to join the NCAA-Department of Defense Concussion Assessment, Research and Education Consortium
    • Student team wins CyberSEED documentary challenge — Out of 30 schools — to include Brown, Penn State and Syracuse universities — it was Bloomsburg University’s documentary chosen as the best at the recent CyberSEED conference
    • Record gift establishes Center for Supply Chain Management — Nicholas J. Giuffre ’78 contributed a $2.5 million blended gift to the BU Foundation, establishing the Nicholas J. Giuffre Center for Supply Chain Management in the College of Business
    • American Ninja Warrior competitor headlines leadership summit — Celebrity keynote speaker Hoan Do commenced the 10th annual Husky Student Leadership Summit with his personal story
    • Nick Cannon brings Wild ‘N Out to campus — Nick Cannon, Anthony “Chico” Bean, RIP Michaels, Conceited, DC Young Fly, DJ D-Wrek, Karlous Miller, and Matt Rife graced the stage for two hours of hilarious jokes, audience participation, a little dancing, and A LOT of laughter
    • CNN talent headlines Sankofa Conference — Marc Lamont Hill’s moving keynote speech spoke to the conference’s theme “Celebrating the past while embracing the future,” using his personal journey as a college drop-out through graduate school to becoming one of the leading intellectual voices in the country.
    • Judge Mathis brings TV courtroom to Mitrani Hall — Judge Greg Mathis, civil rights activist and well-known TV personality, headlined Bloomsburg University’s MLK Commemorative Celebration with a discussion on Political Empowerment: Maintaining and Building Your Community
    • Campus hosts inaugural BloomCON Forensics and Security Conference —  For two days the digital forensics world converged on Bloomsburg University for its first-ever BloomCON Forensics and Security Conference that featured more than 20 expert field speakers, including seven of BU’s own digital forensics faculty
    • Act 101 launches Act Now for Success! — New this spring to Act 101/EOP is their Act Now for Success! workshop series, launching different workshops covering general education requirements, financial aid, student clubs, declaring a major and much more
    • NSSLHA helps provide “Hope for Harper” — NSSLHA wanted to kick off the new semester with a substantial donation to a local family in need. And it did just that with the help of Facebook, which led the pre-professional student organization for speech-language pathology and audiology majors to an inspirational 3-year-old girl

    Congrats to the Class of 2016!

    Nearly 1,400 graduates received diplomas during three ceremonies Saturday, May 7, on the Academic Quadrangle. The first ceremony began at 8:30 a.m. for the 302 graduates of the College of Business and 149 graduates from the College of Education. Commencement for the 350 graduates of the College of Science and Technology was held at 12:30 p.m., with the final ceremony for the 403 graduates of the College of Liberal Arts at 4 p.m.

    Top honor graduates

    Students who earned the highest grade-point average in each college were:

    • College of Business — Dustin Grymko, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Accounting
    • College of Education — Kristin Bernadette Epsaro, Bethlehem, Bachelor of Science in Education in Middle-Level Education (4-8) with an emphasis in mathematics; Dannielle Marie Rayhon, Roseto, dual Bachelor of Science in Education in Secondary Education and English; Nicole Lori Southcott, Downingtown, Bachelor of Science in Education in Special Education (PK-8) and Elementary Education (PK-4) with an emphasis in language arts
    • College of Liberal Arts — Aaron Michael Brown, Hughesville, dual Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies and Languages and Cultures
    • College of Science and Technology — Bradlee Jayde Mix, Williamsport, Bachelor of Science in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology with a minor in special education

    Degrees for 162 graduate students and 12 doctoral candidates were conferred during a ceremony on Friday, May 6, at 7 p.m. in Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall.

    Nursing program tops ratings

    Nursing Program

    Bloomsburg University’s nursing program has been rated first in the commonwealth and 60th in the nation by CollegeAtlas.org. The rating, based on data from the 2013-14 academic year, considered affordability, academic quality, accessibility and pass rates on the board exam.

    The rating places BU’s nursing program above seven sister institutions in Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education: Indiana University of Pennsylvania, second; East Stroudsburg, fifth; Edinboro, ninth; West Chester, 11th; Mansfield, 18th; Lock Haven, 20th; and Clarion, 24th.

    For nearly a decade, CollegeAtlas.org has provided up-to-date information about college and higher education opportunities to help prospective students make informed choices about universities, degrees and academic programs.

    Computer Science students assist Geisinger ADHD study

    Geisinger ADHD Study

    Throughout the course of the spring semester, a group of computer science majors worked on a project for their Software Engineering course to benefit the Geisinger Research Department’s ADHD study. Two projects were given to the group of students among this class.

    The first project had the objective of developing a mobile application that would store data extracted from wearable devices such as Apple Watches and FitBits in order to help with the diagnoses of adolescents with ADHD.

    Of particular interest was postural sway, a motor deficit that has been reported in children with ADHD across multiple studies. In addition to this data, they were also required to store heartrate, acceleration, and pedometer information; the more data we could extract and store from HealthKit, the better.

    Over the past 14 weeks, Ember Baker, Lucas Liberacki, James Toth, Evan Zimmerman, and Riley Renn worked on developing a MySQL database, ASP.NET web services, a website application, and an iOS application for use by Geisinger in their studies. The application and website present the user with all of their data in the form of graphs and spreadsheets.

    Each member of the team had a specific area to focus on throughout the project. Renn was responsible for database design and management, Baker was involved with creating the iOS application, Liberacki– the website,Zimmerman– the web services, and Toth floated in between groups to help out wherever it was needed.

    FMA earns Superior Chapter Award

    FMA Honors

    Bloomsburg University’s Financial Management Association was named a “Superior Chapter” this spring by the international Financial Management Association.

    Only 23 of 175 universities received this honor this year. The highest honor for an FMA Student Chapter or Honor Society is the attainment of the "Superior Chapter" designation. With more than 175 active student chapters, less than 10 percent receive this honor each year.

    The purpose of the FMA is to:

    • initiate and maintain fellowship among students who are actively interested in the area of corporate finance, investments, banking, insurance, and other related fields
    • encourage interaction between students, faculty, and business professionals through professional presentations, open discussion, field trips, and other opportunities
    • provide the FMA students aids in professional development and career planning by facilitating the distribution and exchange of career‐related information
    • develop a better understanding of current business and economy through corporate presentations and open discussion of current issues
    • achieve superior chapter recognition from FMA International

    Going from “Great to Greater”

    Act 101 Breakfast Event

    A group of Act 101/EOP students recently traveled to York College to hear its president speak on her journey from research scientist in health sciences to administrator in higher education.

    Pamela Gunter-Smith, who previously held academic positions at George Washington University and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, presented “Great to Greater” for the American Council on Education Pennsylvania’s Women’s Network of Central Pennsylvania Breakfast event.

    “Her message to women was very powerful, as she explained her triumphs throughout her life and how she never gave up,” said Ty-nia Dorsey, sophomore. “Her confidence gave me some sort of inspiration for myself. With us being part of the minority and women it is hard to succeed in the fields we want to be in. She never gave up and not only did she succeed but she became a leader.”

    A scientist and educator, Gunter-Smith has served on numerous committees that address science education and the underrepresentation of minorities in science. These include review panels for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

    “She had people backing her ever since she was born and she was able to graduate and get her masters and Ph.D.,” said Naiya Brown, a junior psychology major pursuing a minor in communication studies. “She took chances and valued every opportunity that came her way! She is my motivation and if she can accomplish her goals and work hard, then I'll be next in a couple of years!”

    Police Week display

    Police Week

    Bloomsburg University Police will host a display of vehicles and equipment from local law enforcement agencies on Monday, May 16, from 3 to 6 p.m. in the Swisher Circle parking lot, behind Andruss Library. Departments from throughout Columbia County, including the Pennsylvania State Police, have been invited to participate in the National Police Week observance. The event is open to the public free of charge.

    In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation which designated May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day and the week in which that date falls as Police Week. Currently, tens of thousands of law enforcement officers from around the world converge on Washington, DC to participate in a number of planned events which honor those that have paid the ultimate sacrifice.

    National Police Week draws in between 25,000 to 40,000 attendees. The attendees come from departments throughout the United States as well as from agencies throughout the world. This provides a unique opportunity to meet others that share a common brotherhood. In that spirit, the Fraternal Order of Police DC Lodge #1 sponsors receptions each afternoon and evening during Police Week. These events are open to all law enforcement personnel and are an experience unlike any other.

    High school teams face off in Science Iditarod

    Science Iditarod

    Nine teams of future scientists from high schools across the region competed in Bloomsburg University’s recent Science Iditarod, an annual science quiz-bowl-style competition for high school students.

    Small student teams competed in rounds of geoscience, biology, chemistry and physics, with a plaque presented to the winner for each round. The teams with the top two cumulative scores went head-to-head in an all science Super Round. The winning team took home a trophy.

    This year, BU hosted teams from East Juniata Area, Shamokin Area, Old Forge Area, Southern Columbia Area, and Wyoming Area high schools.

    Anthropology research showcased at statewide conference

    Anthropology Research

    Anthropology students presented papers and posters on topics varying from Hopewell and Maya Archaeology to the Anthropology of Sports, Library Ethnography, and Primatology at this spring’s PASSHE Undergraduate Anthropology Conference hosted by California University.

    Students were accompanied by Faith Wymer, Damien Marken, and DeeAnne Wymer. Their travel was supported by the College of Liberal Arts and the Department of Anthropology.

    Student Presentations

    • The Impact in Youth Sports on Adult Athlete Self- Confidence: An Ethnographic Study in the Anthropology of Sport by Alexandra Wheatley
    • Why Do People Cycle? An Ethnographic Study of Bicycle Culture by Patsy Van Dyke, Summer 2016 URSCA Award
    • The Snake Den Mound Group in Context: An Analysis of Hopewell Hilltop Earthworks by Zachary Cooper
    • Comic Issues: Print or Digital? by Matthew Hansen
    • Tropical Urban Topography: GIS Analysis of the Classic Maya Site El Peru- Waka’ by Erika V. Maxson
    • Between the Land and the Sky: Micro-contextual Archaeology of the Snake Den Mound Group by Austin Hughes
    • An Ethnographic Study of Romance Novel Enthusiasts: An Application of Literary Anthropology by Facia Sirleaf
    • If the Cardigan Fits, Wear It: An Ethnographic Study of Librarian Stereotypes by Marissa Weaver

    Student Posters

    • Feeding Patterns of the Black-Handed Spider Monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) around the Piro Research Station, Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica by Kelly Haggerty
    • Leaving a Mark on History: A Visual Representation of Centralia by Jessica Amato
    • Ethnic Identity in the Health Outcomes of Early Anthracite Mining by Jacob Osborne

    COB students complete Zeigler case studies

    Zeigler Case Competition

    Bloomsburg University’s College of Business held its spring Zeigler Case Competition, where students presented case studies for a selected panel of judges which included alumni, faculty, university provost and vice provost. Eight groups of students presented and a top three were selected for first, second and third place.

    Students were required to present a case study on Tata Communications in India, which they had to decide if the company should fully acquire Pascal, a telecommunications company in Russia, to take a half stake on the company, or to not bid upon the company at all.

    Teams were presented background information on Tada and financial information on Pascal and were asked to present their decision to the board of judges.

    First place went to Group 7 led by faculty coach Chris Kilgus, team members were: Andrea Dietrich, Brandi Gift, Mathew Harries, Darren Lucca, and Steven Pask.

    Senior ITM major and member of Beta Gamma Sigma, Andrea Dietrich, shared how it felt to take first place with her group, “Taking first place was encouraging but the experience alone was definitely worth all the hard work. Going against other teams that worked just as hard, with coaches that were just as motivated made it a great learning experience.”

    High Schools compete in programming contest

    High School Programming

    Fifty teams from 24 schools participated in the 21st annual High School Programming Contest conducted by Bloomsburg University's Department of Mathematical and Digital Sciences on Tuesday, April 12. Four-person teams worked on 10 problems provided by BU faculty members during the three-hour contest in Kehr Union Ballroom. The teams’ solutions were judged by undergraduates in the computer science major and the Association for Computing Machinery student club.

    The winning team, We Dem Bees from Emmaus, and second-place team, 1337 Enigmas from State College, each solved nine problems. The top 10 teams received plaques, and the top 10 placing schools received prizes, including sets of Amazon gift certificates valued at $150 and $100, provided by guest speaker Len Kalechitz, a 2001 computer science graduate, and his company, Solution Development Firm.

    THIS internship works for social work

    THIS Social Work

    An internship based in Harrisburg learning the dynamics of state government seems perfectly suited for a political science major. How about social work?

    Yes, according to Bloomsburg University’s social work program that has seen several of its students participate in Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education’s The Harrisburg Internship Semester (THIS) in recent years.

    “Social workers have a unique perspective to bring to the government,” said Cassandra Hourlland, a senior social work major. “They have a broad range of knowledge and skills that can be used in multiple situations. Social workers can educate people in office on certain issues while advocating for the rights and safety of at risk populations.”

    Hourlland has spent this spring interning in the Department of Human Services in the Policy Development office. She has had the opportunity to tag along to all different meetings, helped draft and read over bills, attended press events and policy summits and researches.

    “The best thing about being an intern, is everyone is willing to talk to you,” Hourlland said. “I have had the pleasure to meet and talk with a lot of amazing individuals. The way the office is set up, everyone takes different program offices that deal with different issues and populations.”

    Husky contingent takes on Model European Union simulation

    Model UN Simulation

    A group of Bloomsburg University students participated in the 2016 Model European Union simulation hosted this spring by the University of Pittsburgh.

    The undergraduate Model European Union is an annual event that gives students a chance to learn about the workings of the European Union through preparation for and participation in a hands-on two-day simulation.

    Model EU enhances students’ understanding of the issues and challenges facing the 28 member nations of the EU. Awards are given to the most effective delegations and best individual position papers. Participating students (L-R): Justice Powlus, Kim Martin, Thomas Weber, Shyer Amin, Emma Holland and Iliana Anapolsky.

    Husky Career Road Trip to the nation's capital

    Husky Career Road Trip

    A busload of students made a Husky Career Road Trip to Washington, D.C. in April to explore career and internship opportunities.

    Victoria Geyfman, associate professor finance, and her students toured the Federal Reserve and FDIC; Neil Strine, associate professor political science, and his students met with PA legislators.

    Another group of students visited The Washington Center Headquarters, including some who will be completing internships there and others exploring internship opportunities. A total 24 students made the trip accompanied by six faculty and also staff from the Office of Alumni and Professional Engagement.

    The trip included a career networking social with BU alumni living in Washington, D.C.

    Theta Zeta raises nearly $500 to fight cystic fibrosis

    Theta Zeta Walk

    Theta Zeta — Bloomsburg University's chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society for Nursing — recently participated in the Cystic Fibrosis Great Strides Walk in Bloomsburg.

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-threatening, genetic disease that causes persistent lung infections and progressively limits the ability to breathe.

    Under the leadership of senior student, Kendra Betz, the team raised nearly $500 to support the mission of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation through popcorn and tee shirt sales, and donations.

    Team walkers were Margie Eckroth-Bucher, faculty; Michele Vining, adjunct faculty; Logan Fouts; Nikki Oman; Abby Brown; Gwen Davis; Kathleen Fulton; Alison Turzanski; Kristy Sands, faculty; Carissa Pupo; Brooke Elliot; Debra Stayer, faculty; Kenzie Sands; Kendra Betz.

    Professional sales one of nation’s best

    Professional Sales

    Bloomsburg University is named among the top North American schools in the 2016 Sales Education Foundation’s (SEF) listing of the best universities offering professional sales education. BU is one of only four Pennsylvania institutions included in the listing.

    Monica Favia, chair and assistant professor of marketing, said SEF recognizes institutions for elevating the sales profession through university education. “This recognition will help our students to secure professional sales positions,” she said. BU’s professional sales in marketing specialization began in 2015.

    According to SEF, while employment rates remain flat for recent college graduates, many university sales programs report placement rates above 95 percent for their sales students, with some reporting 100 percent placement. Starting salaries for professional sales representatives average over $60,000.

    Digital forensics recognized for excellence

    NCAE Cyber Defense

    Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s digital forensics program has been designated a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education. The designation by the National Center of Academic Excellence (CAE) in Information Assurance Education is valid for five academic years.

    This recognition indicates BU’s digital forensics program has met stringent criteria related to curriculum, faculty and research. It demonstrates an institution-wide commitment to information assurance practices and education. Sponsored by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security, CAE programs promote higher education and research to increase the number of professionals with information assurance expertise and reduce U.S. infrastructure vulnerability.

    History major's research leads to URSCA, study abroad opportunity

    Elizabeth Miller

    Elizabeth Miller, a history and Arabic major who is minoring in Middle East Studies, recently presented her paper “Deciphering Osama bin Laden’s Radicalization based on United States Actions, Policies and Presence in Saudi Arabia 1990-2001” at CERIS’s undergraduate symposium at Duquesne.

    Miller recently received an URSCA grant to expand her research on this topic during summer of 2016, which will commence following her return back from the Arabic study abroad program in Morocco. She believes these suggestions will be helpful in expanding her research project.

    Also representing Bloomsburg University was M. Safa Saracoglu, professor of history, who will supervise Miller’s URSCA project over the summer. Saracoglu delivered the keynote address for the symposium, “Debating the Syrian Refugee Crisis.”

    Communication Studies class turns project into awareness campaign

    Teal Campaign

    In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, a group of Bloomsburg University students decided to paint the Town of Bloomsburg teal throughout April.

    Students studying Communication for Business Professionals worked with local businesses to enhance their internal and external communication methods. One group of students worked with the Women’s Center, Inc. in Bloomsburg to help them spread awareness of the “Paint the Town Teal” campaign.

    April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and to publicize this, the students painted the window fronts of businesses downtown teal with hand prints, ribbons, and acronyms. They also took awareness posters into local businesses in order for them to post them within their restrooms.

    Nursing students help Montour County with healthy habits

    Community Health Nurses

    To cap their Public Health and Community work this semester, a group of Bloomsburg University nursing majors recently helped Montour County become a little healthier.

    The semester project involved a health promotion initiative specifically targeting older adults. The class chose Montour County and studied county data to determine the biggest health issues for the community.

    As a result, the student nurses designed a health fair to education older adults on heart health, exercise and nutrition — taking them to Vintage Knolls Assisted Living Community and the Danville Area Community Center.

    Accounting alumni score high on CPA exam

    CPA Exam

    Congratulations to Bloomsburg University accounting alumni Michael P. Gimino '14, '15, and Michael R. Rosten '14. They were among the top 15 scorers on the CPA exam for 2015, according to National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA).

    The top scorers are those individuals whose combined scores on all four sections of the CPA exam were the highest of all Pennsylvania exam takers last year. These young professionals have passed the CPA exam with distinction, completed their 150 credit hour requirement, and will soon complete their year of experience to become certified as public accountants in the state of Pennsylvania.

    While reflecting on excellence, the past two cohorts in the BU Master of Accountancy program have distinguished themselves on the audit portion of the CPA exam. Fifty percent, 10 of 20 reported, passed the audit section with scores in the 90 percentage range, with an average of ninety percent for the entire group of 20. What an impressive result — a reflection of the students’ hard work under the tutelage of Mike Shapeero. In fact, three M.Acc. students passed the CPA section with scores of 99, the highest possible score. Those three are Michael P. Gimino '14, '15, Eric Hiser '14, '15, and Brandon J. Arizini '15, '16.

    BU's accounting students achieved a national ranking for their performance on the 2015 CPA Examination. BU placed in the top 15% nationwide among universities in the medium sized program category, with a 62.6 percent pass rate for first-time test takers, well exceeding the average pass rate of 50 percent. The students earned the highest average exam score among exam takers from all graduate programs in Pennsylvania. Their pass rate of 82.4 percent was third highest in the state, just behind Carnegie Mellon and the University of Pennsylvania.

    Phi Beta Lambda shines at state leadership conference

    Phi Beta Lambda

    Nearly 40 Bloomsburg University business students recently participated in the Pennsylvania State Phi Beta Lambda Competitive Events held at the Pennsylvania Phi Beta Lambda State Leadership Conference in Harrisburg.

    At the conference, students were required to compete in a number of competitive events, which required on the spot preparation and presentation of topics ranging from all business and economics disciplines. They competed against many "top" schools around the Commonwealth, including Penn State, Temple, Drexel, University of Pittsburgh, and Duquesne.

    Participating students also had the opportunity to attend many professional development sessions, according to Todd A. Shawver, assistant professor of accounting.

    Ryan Kassees was also elected as new Treasurer of the Pennsylvania State Phi Beta Lambda Chapter. BU’s Phi Beta Lambda Chapter also earned second place as the Gold Seal Chapter Award of Merit/Outstanding Chapter.

    Political Science announces Prateek Goorha award winner

    Political Science Research

    With dreams of becoming Secretary of State one day, Kimberly Martin is eyeing a long career in government and politics. So the Bloomsburg University junior knew majoring in political science would be a significant first step.

    “Political science has really helped me build the solid foundation of knowledge necessary to start on my career path,” says Martin, who is also majoring in communication studies and pursuing a minor in Arabic. “I want to pursue a career with the U.S. Department of State and work on creating foreign policy and developing diplomatic relations with other countries.”

    She adds, “I am more than confident I will achieve all of my goals, in part because of the skills I have learned in the political science major.”

    Martin was recently named the winner of the Prateek Goorha Best Research Paper Award from Fall 2015 for her paper “Marriage, Careers, and the Voting Woman,” which took a look at understanding what influences women’s voting habits.

    Sekisui leaders offer insight into manufacturing industry

    Sekisui Presentation

    Ronn Cort, a local business executive, recently visited with several student groups and faculty from Bloomsburg University’s College of Business to discuss, “Polymers—Grown in Central PA.” His presentation focused on positioning Sekisui SPI, a Bloomsburg manufacturer of specialty thermoplastics, for future growth and good-paying manufacturing careers.

    “(The presentations) showed us what we should be looking for,” said Garret Werkheiser, vice president of BU’s student chapter of Association for Production and Inventory Control Systems (APICS). “Companies now-a-days aren’t looking for profit, looking to better help community.”

    Cort, president and Chief Operating Officer of Sekisui SPI, emphasized his firm’s commitment to cause, employees, sustainability, and customers. More than 200 students and faculty attended the presentation.

    Prior to his presentation, Julie Salnicky, an alumna and Special Projects Manager at Sekisui SPI, presented a workshop for students and faculty on the Keystone Innovation Zone opportunities Sekisui is pursuing.

    Students shine at Kutztown PACISE Conference

    PACISE Annual Conference

    A group of Bloomsburg University students recently participated in the PACISE Annual Conference at Kutztown University, where they presented on a panel discussion and competed in a computer programming contest.

    Ember Baker, a senior computer science major, and Irenes Sanchez, a senior information and technology management major, were members of a discussion panel on “Enrolling Women into Computing and Information Technology Majors.”

    They were joined by Loreen Powell, associate professor of information and technology management, and faculty and students from four other PASSHE schools. The panel was moderated by Robert Montante, associate professor in mathematical and digital sciences.

    The conference also featured a four-hour programming contest. Computer science majors Jake Daniel, Brian Fekete, Brett Logan, Lucas Liberacki, Tim Caulfield, and Rio Weber competed as two teams in a field of 14 teams from PASSHE schools. Daniel, Fekete, and Logan took 2nd Place as team “Men in Computing.”

    Theta Zeta celebrates 30th anniversary, inducts new members

    Theta Zeta Ceremony

    Theta Zeta, Bloomsburg University’s Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, recently held its induction ceremony at the Pine Barn Inn in Danville.

    Families, friends, faculty and member of Theta Zeta were present to honor the 34 undergraduate and graduate students who were inducted into this prestigious society.

    Sigma Theta Tau is the only honor society for nursing. Theta Zeta also celebrated its 30th anniversary with a honoring of past and the current president occurred as part of the induction ceremony.

    Sigma Theta Tau membership is by invitation to baccalaureate and graduate nursing students who demonstrate excellence in scholarship and to nurse leaders exhibiting exceptional achievements in nursing. Here are some additional facts about our membership:

    • STTI has more than 135,000 active members.
    • Members reside in more than 85 countries.
    • 39 percent of active members hold master’s and/or doctoral degrees; 51 percent are in staff positions; 19 percent are administrators or supervisors; 18 percent are faculty/academics; and 12 percent are in advanced practice.
    • There are roughly 500 chapters at approximately 695 institutions of higher education throughout Armenia, Australia, Botswana, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, England, Ghana, Hong Kong, Japan, Kenya, Lebanon​, Malawi, Mexico, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Portugal, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Swaziland, Sweden, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.
    • STTI communicates regularly with more than 100 nurse leaders who have expressed interest in establishing chapters globally, including those in Chile, China, Costa Rica, Denmark, Finland, India, Ireland, Israel, Germany, Jamaica, Jordan, New Zealand, and Spain.

    Economics class gets inside look at Federal Reserve System

    Federal Reserve System

    A group of economics majors studying Economics of Money and Banking this spring visited the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in Washington, D.C.

    A special one-hour tour organized for the students — joined by Nakul Kumar, assistant professor of economics, — introduced them to the history and functions of the Federal Reserve System.

    Students got a chance to explore the special research library, and the boardroom, where the Chairperson and the Governors of the Federal Reserve make key monetary policy decisions.

    The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, commonly known as the Federal Reserve Board, is the main governing body of the Federal Reserve System. It is charged with overseeing the Federal Reserve Banks and with helping implement monetary policy of the United States. Governors are appointed by the President of the United States and confirmed by the Senate for staggered 14-year terms.

    EGGS assistant professor earns education award

    Environmental Award

    The Columbia County Conservation District honored Jennifer Whisner, assistant professor environmental, geographical and geological sciences, this spring with an Environmental Education Achievement Award.

    Whisner has served on numerous committees and presently serves as the chairperson for the Columbia/ Montour Coalition for Source Water Protection. She also, currently serves as secretary of the Fishing Creek Watershed Association.

    Not to mention, she has presented at many educational events and had volunteered to help with Conservation District events at the district and at Kocher Park. She has also been on panels discussing Screenings on “Blue Gold: Waterwise” and Blue Water, Green Solutions."

    Whisner follows the mission of the conservation district, thus earning the Environmental Education Achievement Award.

    Cannon named honorary BU alumna

    Maria Baron Cannon

    Maria Baron Cannon, vice president of channel marketing for TE Connectivity and Bloomsburg University Foundation Board member, was named honorary alumna during BU’s alumni awards dinner on Saturday, April 23.

    Four graduates also were recognized for their contributions to the university and their professions, including Crystal Skotedis, CPA and director with Boyer & Ritter CPAs and Consultants, who received the 2016 Volunteer of the Year award.

    Cannon, San Jose, Calif., is the daughter of two BU graduates, the late Charles Baron ’52 and Margaret Suchy Baron ’49. In accepting the award, Cannon, who describes herself as a “Husky by choice,” said her parents met after graduating from Bloomsburg and instilled in her a passion for the university. After her father’s death, the family established a scholarship in his name.

    In addition to the Foundation Board, Cannon serves on the College of Business Advisory Board. She has participated regularly in career programs for students offered as part of the Zeigler Institute for Professional Development (ZIPD). Prior to joining TE, she was at the helm of Cisco’s Worldwide Distribution Operations Organization, serving in various vice presidential roles. A graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, she holds a degree in electrical engineering and computer science.

    Difficult, but not impossible

    Boenell Kline

    On Sunday, April 24, Boenell Kline, a senior communications studies major, Rang the Carver Hall Bell to celebrate the impact of the scholarships she has received through the It's Personal Campaign. Kline shared her story at the 2016 Scholarship Luncheon:

    "On paper, I would not have been someone that most would have chosen to invest in. I struggled academically through high school, scored borderline disabled on my SATs, and had to go to my high school guidance counselor 11 years after graduating because I did not know how to fill out a college application. Despite my academic disadvantage, Bloomsburg University took a chance and allowed me the privilege to become a Husky."

    Kline added, "Because of my academic struggles, I was placed in developmental classes as a freshman, and it was not long before I began to fall behind in my math class. But, I was blessed to have an amazing instructor who noticed me struggling and made it a point to help."

    Local dancers join Koresh Dance Company

    Koresch Dance Performance

    Local dancers will perform as part of the Koresh Dance Company’s opening act in a Celebrity Artist Series program Saturday, April 23, at 8 p.m. in Bloomsburg University’s Haas Center for Performing Arts, Mitrani Hall. Thirteen dancers and an alternate from local studios and Bloomsburg University, ranging in age from 12 to 23, were chosen through audition to perform in the opening number. Rehearsals for the 5-minute-long original piece began in February, directed by Amber Bassett of Danceworks by Amber.

    The dancers and the studios or organizations they represent are:

    • BU Dance Minor Program: Shaakirah Bradshaw, Dreland Goar, Carlos Santiago, Dana Shirley and Akia Williams
    • BU Student Dance Ensemble: Mackenzie Liberta and Shelby Minier
    • Bloomsburg School of Dance: Samantha Kurian
    • Danceworks by Amber: Lexi Groshek and Morgan Mungo
    • Gronsky School of Dance: Adrianna Rakauskas
    • Moyer Institute of Dance: Zoe Betz and Kara Heim
    • Northern Columbia Ballet: Angela Bagnata
    • Koresh Dance Company, founded by Israeli-born artistic director Ronen Koresh in 1991, is based in Philadelphia. The New Yorker describes the troupe’s signature style as “earthy, folk-dancey, emotionally direct, and physically intense.”

      Cannon named honorary BU alumna

      Maria Baron Cannon

      Maria Baron Cannon, vice president of channel marketing for TE Connectivity and Bloomsburg University Foundation Board member, was named honorary alumna during BU’s alumni awards dinner on Saturday, April 23.

      Four graduates also were recognized for their contributions to the university and their professions, including Crystal Skotedis, CPA and director with Boyer & Ritter CPAs and Consultants, who received the 2016 Volunteer of the Year award.

      Cannon, San Jose, Calif., is the daughter of two BU graduates, the late Charles Baron ’52 and Margaret Suchy Baron ’49. In accepting the award, Cannon, who describes herself as a “Husky by choice,” said her parents met after graduating from Bloomsburg and instilled in her a passion for the university. After her father’s death, the family established a scholarship in his name.

      In addition to the Foundation Board, Cannon serves on the College of Business Advisory Board. She has participated regularly in career programs for students offered as part of the Zeigler Institute for Professional Development (ZIPD). Prior to joining TE, she was at the helm of Cisco’s Worldwide Distribution Operations Organization, serving in various vice presidential roles. A graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, she holds a degree in electrical engineering and computer science.

      Childhood Play conference comes to campus

      Playwork Conference

      The seventh annual Mini-Conference on Play, Childhood Development, and Early Education will be held on Friday, April 29, beginning at 8 a.m. in Bloomsburg University’s Andruss Library, Schweiker Room.

      This year’s conference emphasizes the promotion of developmentally and culturally appropriate practices by highlighting the interplay among child development, early education and play. The conference aims to increase interdisciplinary understanding of the role of family, community, and educational practices.

      This year’s topics include: teaching teachers to play in early childhood education, international perspectives on play, and play-friendly parents and teachers. The conference is free of charge and open to all students, faculty and members of the greater Bloomsburg community.

      This event is sponsored by BU’s College of Education, the Pennsylvania State University College of Education, and the Syracuse University Department of Child and Family Studies & Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics.

      Putting the you in Professional U

      Career Boot Camp

      Bloomsburg University’s Center for Professional Development and Career Experience (CPDCE) hosted its first-ever Career Intensive Boot Camp earlier this semester with 50 students participating in a variety workshops to include salary and benefit negotiation, office communication and adapting to change. BU faculty, alumni, and outside professionals helped students navigate these critical areas of their professional lives, launching them one step closer to their dream job.

      Among the participants was Taylor Albinson ‘15, a recent accounting graduate, who is now in a different stage of his professional career.

      “I wish I had more experiences like this during my time as an undergraduate,” Albinson said. “Even if they don’t know it yet, this opportunity has already given these undergraduate students an advantage over their peers, people who they will be competing with for jobs or internships."

      Taylor said the most beneficial workshop to him was “First Week on the Job: What to Expect,” taught by Erica Smith ’98, because “tips and advice for new employees are something that people don’t hear a lot, so it was nice to hear from successful professionals who have actually been in my shoes and are in positions now that I could see myself in.”

      Upcoming Professional U Opportunities

      • Professional Etiquette: Which Fork Do I Use to Was That Joke Inapprops? — April 25 at 6:30 p.m. in McCormick 1303
      • Gain Experience Now! Building a Competitive Edge through your College Career — April 26 at 6:30 p.m. in McCormick 2303
      • I Owe What? Your Student Loans, Your Debt, Your Payments with PHEAA Rep and Alum, Marla Kane — April 26 at 1 p.m. online
      • CPDCE Walk-In Wednesdays — April 27 at 3:30 p.m. in 201 Warren Student Service Center
      • Translating Skills: Mowing Lawns and Flipping Burgers ARE Resume Builders! Alumni Panel — April 27 at 6:30 p.m. in Hartline room G42
      • Husky Connect: Student/Alumni Career Chat Night — April 28 at 7 p.m. online: register here

      38th Annual Renaissance Jamboree in Downtown Bloomsburg

      Renaissance Jamboree

      The 38th Annual Renaissance Jamboree will be held on Main Street in Downtown Bloomsburg, Saturday, April 23, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., rain or shine. The festival features arts and crafts vendors, live entertainment throughout the event at four locations, kids’ activities, community organizations and plenty of great food. The entertainment schedule is available online at RenaissanceJamboree.org.

      Free parking with shuttle service will be available during the event at the Bloomsburg Fairgrounds. Handicapped parking is available behind the Bloomsburg Public Library. Attendees are asked to please leave pets at home.

      One of the largest events cosponsored by the University and the Town, the day will feature over 120 crafters, 75 non-profits with food, games and displays, and entertainment in four locations. I’ve attached an entertainment schedule - you can print it out (old school) or just have it on your smart phone (new school). And people do dance in the streets especially to Joyous who will be playing two sets at noon on the Courthouse Stage. They are being followed by Slavic Soul Party so the dancing will continue.

      Renaissance Jamboree is sponsored by Bloomsburg University and its Program Board, The Columbia Montour Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Bloomsburg Incorporated and the Town of Bloomsburg.

      Geisinger CEO to deliver keynote lecture

       Dr. David Feinberg

      Dr. David Feinberg, president and chief executive officer for the Geisinger Health System, will present the keynote lecture to open Bloomsburg University’s Health Sciences Symposium and Wellness Fair on Thursday, April 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Performing Arts, Mitrani Hall. The 25th annual Health Sciences Symposium and 30th annual Wellness Fair will continue at 9 a.m. Friday, April 22, in the Kehr Union Ballroom and Multipurpose Rooms.

      Feinberg, recognized among the 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare as well as the 50 Most Influential Physician Executives and Leaders by Modern Healthcare, is triple board certified in child and adolescent psychiatry, adult psychiatry and addiction psychiatry. He has published numerous professional articles and is a leading speaker on topics including the patient experience, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and adolescent substance abuse.

      Health Sciences Symposium and Wellness Fair

      Presentations by BU faculty and community professionals will take place Friday, April 22, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the Kehr Union Ballrooms. Topics range from general health-related subjects to research conducted by the Weis Center for Research at Geisinger Medical Center, Danville. Posters prepared by BU undergraduate and graduate biology and nursing students will be displayed in the Kehr Union Lobby and Multipurpose Rooms beginning at 9 a.m. on Friday.

      Professor discusses poverty and crime

      Bob Moschgat

      Delving into the reason why poverty is the strongest explanation for violent crime rates across time and place, the Institute for Culture and Society presents “A Rural Consideration of the Subculture of Violence Hypothesis” by Bloomsburg University faculty member Bob Moschgat. The lecture will be held on Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, room 218. Admission is free and open to the public.

      At the individual level of poverty, most research has focused on a subculture of violence centered in inner city communities, which passes from one generation to the next. In opposition, previous research has demonstrated that homicide rates are higher in rural areas.

      Moschgat, assistant professor of criminal justice, will discuss the study’s effort to desegregate the effects of familial and structural disadvantage on attitudes towards violence, violent victimization, and involvement in violence across rural, urban, and suburban settings using longitudinal data from the National Youth Survey.

      Green Awareness for #BUEarthDay

      A film series focusing on “green awareness” concludes at Bloomsburg University with the documentary, “This Changes Everything,” on Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

      “This Changes Everything” is an attempt to re-imagine the challenge of climate change. Inspired by Naomi Klein’s international non-fiction bestseller of the same name, the film presents seven portraits of communities from the everyday perspective. Alongside these stories is Klein’s narration, connecting the carbon in the air with the economic system that put it there. Throughout this film, Klein builds to the idea that society can grasp the concept of climate change to transform our economic system.

      Rated S for Sustainability

      Bloomsburg University is hosting "Green is the New Black" event to celebrate Earth Day 2016 on Wednesday, April 20, from 10 to 3 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom. BU’s Communication Studies Event Planning Class is planning an exciting way to celebrate Earth Day on campus. Take a break from final projects, papers and tests to learn about green living and engage in environmental activism!

      There will be free food, fun and eco-friendly activities and exciting prizes to be won throughout the day! Be one of the lucky ones to discover a laminated Earth Day 2016 leaf hidden around campus the #BUEarthDay Scavenger Hunt and turn it in for one of many donated prizes or gift certificates at the Earth Day event. Updates and additional information about the event can be found via social media with @BUearthday.

      PADME features hand embroidery workshop

      Artist Alisha McCurdy will lead a hand embroidery workshop as part of Bloomsburg University’s 12th annual Personal Adornment Day and Makeup Extravaganza (PADME) on Wednesday, April 20. The workshop, from 1 to 4 p.m. in the art center at The Greenly Center, 50 E. Main St., Bloomsburg, will allow participants to explore and share their sense of community. Each participant will use hand embroidery and free motion machine sewing to create pieces that will be brought together to reflect the community. The finished product will be exhibited at the Stairwell Gallery at The Exchange, 24 E. Main St. The workshop is free and open to the public.

      McCurdy grew up in western Pennsylvania, but she didn’t understand the Northern Appalachian region’s influence in her life until she moved away. Primarily embodying sculptural and installation forms, McCurdy’s artwork borrows craft-based techniques that are familiar to Appalachia. In this diverse approach, her work shares common respect for labor and creativity that are indicative of the community where she was raised. Her works are on display in BU’s Haas Gallery of the Art through Tuesday, May 3, in the exhibit, “Out of Seam.” McCurdy will offer a lecture April 20 at 11 a.m. in the gallery as part of a reception from 10:30 a.m. to noon. The gallery is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Saturday from noon to 2 p.m.

      PADME events will conclude with the theatre and art student exhibit, a juried runway show of wearable art, April 20 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Caldwell Consistory, Market Square. Admission is free and open to the public.

      Get an inside look at BU's new IONM certificate program

      IONM

      Bloomsburg University's new Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring (IONM) graduate certificate program will be having an informational meeting on Wednesday, April 20, at 5 p.m. in CEH 201. This meeting will give students the opportunity to ask questions regarding this program.

      IONM encompasses the application of a wide variety of electrophysiological methods to monitor the functional integrity of neural structures during surgery. Monitoring the state of the nervous system in “real-time” during surgery allows for corrective actions to be implemented to prevent permanent deficits, thus improving patient safety and surgical outcomes.

      Bloomsburg University's IONM post-baccalaureate certificate program is aimed to bridge the gaps between the increasing demand of qualified technologists and lack of formal educational programs by providing a one year training program for students interested in pursuing a career as IONM technologists.

      Record turnout raises $52k for relay

      Through the support of 1,138 volunteers making up 62 teams, Bloomsburg University’s Relay for Life — coordinated by Colleges Against Cancer — raised more than $52,200 this spring for the American Cancer Society.

      Each year, more than 4 million people in over 20 countries raise much-needed funds and awareness to save lives from cancer through the Relay For Life movement. This was the third straight year BU's relay has raised more than $50,000 and second consecutive relay to draw more than 1,000 participants.

      Celebrate. Remember. Fight Back. The American Cancer Society Relay For Life event is a life-changing experience that gives everyone in communities across the globe a chance to Celebrate the lives of people who have battled cancer, Remember loved ones lost, and Fight Back against the disease. Each year, more than 4 million people in over 20 countries take part in this global phenomenon and raise much-needed funds and awareness to save lives from cancer.

      Comic. Speaker. Soldier.

      Jody Fuller

      Bloomsburg University's Office of Military and Veterans Resources in collaboration with the University Disabilities Advisory Committee will be hosting Jody Fuller on Tuesday, April 19, at 6 p.m. in Gross Auditorium. Fuller is a veteran and is currently a Major in the Army Reserves and is also a lifetime stutterer. He has a very uplifting message and delivers it via comedy. Jody is absolutely hilarious, be sure to stop come enjoy a nice free evening of comedy with a positive message.

      This event is free and open to the public. We will have a card swipe for anyone who might want to send their students. If you are sending students or are attending for an event requirement, just email me after the event.

      Dance division presents Drippings from the Heart

      Theatre Dance Performance

      Combining the fluid motion of dance with the colorful creations of painting, Bloomsburg University’s Division of Theatre and Dance hosts its sixth annual dance concert, “Drippings from the Heart,” in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. The concert premiere on Sunday, April 17, at 3 p.m. with a second show on Monday, April 18, at 7:30 p.m. Admission is free and open to the public.

      “From the inner-landscapes of our restless minds to exploring emotions, from our personal ‘weird-nesses’ to our triumphs, joys, and unique self-expressions, this breadth of work dissects the human heart,” said Julie Petry, associate professor of music, theatre and dance.

      Petry directed six fully produced works that feature costume, makeup, lighting, sound and choreographic designs created by students, staff, faculty and alumni. The concert’s styles and themes vary greatly from piece to piece.

      Dedication, precision, shared collaboration, and critical body awareness are just a few of the skills students gain through the Division of Theatre and Dance, Petry said. It is a program that seeks to instill students with knowledge of current and contemporary practices, as well as philosophies within the field, while revealing potential career possibilities.

      First Breiner Professorship recipient named

      Breiner Professorship

      Michelle Ficca was recently selected for the professorship, supported by a gift of $1.9 million from Edward and Julianne (Miller) Breiner, who graduated from BU in 1977. The Breiners established the university’s first endowed professorship a year ago in support of an exceptional teacher, mentor and leader.

      Ficca joined BU as an assistant professor of nursing in 1999 and served as associate professor, assistant chairperson and graduate coordinator before becoming chairperson and professor in 2011. Earlier in her career, she taught at Lycoming College and worked in nursing and research positions at Hershey Medical Center, Pleasant Valley School District, Geisinger Medical Center and Williamsport Hospital.

      The Breiner Professorship, established as part of It’s Personal: The Campaign for Bloomsburg University, supports Ficca as the senior faculty member in BU’s new Doctor of Nursing Practice program. Additional funding will be used for research, conferences, travel, software and equipment or other professional expenses.

      “I am honored to be the first recipient of the Breiner Family Endowed Professorship in Nursing,” Ficca said. “I thank the Breiners for establishing this position in recognition of the excellence of the existing Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Nursing programs and the new Doctor of Nursing Practice program. It will assist us in recruiting quality faculty as programs grow."

      Harvard scholar discusses economic inequality

      Gregory Mankiw

      Economics scholar N. Gregory Mankiw, who was appointed chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers by former President George W. Bush, will come to Bloomsburg University on Thursday, April 14, as a guest speaker for the Department of Economics.

      Mankiw will discuss “The Rise in Economic Inequality: Causes and Cures” in his lecture at 2 p.m. in Haas Center of the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Admission for the lecture is free and open to the public.

      A professor of economics at Harvard University, Mankiw teaches macroeconomics, microeconomics, statistics, and principles of economics. In addition to serving as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, he was a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, adviser to the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and the Congressional Budget Office, and member of the Educational Testing Service’s test development committee for the advanced placement exam in economics.

      Along with his two textbooks, “Principles of Economics,” which sold more than 1 million copies in 20 languages, and “Macroeconomics,” Mankiw has published articles in the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Quarterly Journal of Economics, and public forums, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and Fortune.

      Mankiw received his Bachelor of Arts in economics in 1980 at Princeton University and earned his doctorate in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1984. His research includes work on price adjustment, consumer behavior, financial markets, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

      Student Concert Committee presents Kid Ink

      Kid Ink

      Bloomsburg University will host Kid Ink and special guest Lil' Uzi Vert on Thursday, April 14. Doors open at 7p.m., and the show will start at 8 p.m. at the Nelson Field House.

      Released in December of 2015, Kid Ink's newest mixtape, Summer in the Winter (2015) made its way onto Billboard's Top 200, number 10 on Top R&B/Hip Hop Albums, and was number 8 on Rap Albums. With over 140 million views on his music video Show Me featuring Chris Brown, the LA rapper has also done collaborations with artists from Fetty Wap, Usher, Akon, and Omarion.

      Kid Ink concert veteran Rachelle Markovic's favorite part about Kid Ink's concert is the crowd’s energy.

      "I love going to a show and hearing everyone know all of the words to all of the songs,” Markovic said. “I also loved that unlike some artists, Kid Ink actually sounds exactly the same in concert. He also adds in little dance moves that the crowd goes crazy about."

      "He's not a big name rapper yet, so being able to see him live in concert before his career takes off is going to be awesome,” Bevan said. “I like his music, because every single beat he puts to a song is so unique — it's kind of mainstream, but at the same time it's not, he definitely has his own style.”

      Kid Ink tickets will be available for purchase on Thursday, April 14, in the Student Activities Office, KUB 350, until 4 p.m. and at the door (Nelson Field House) with cash only. Prices are the same. Box office opens at 7 p.m.

      Professor on ‘Minority Rights, Bicycle Justice’

      Raymond L. Williams

      Raymond L. Williams, Distinguished Professor of Spanish at the University of California-Riverside, is the author of 15 books on Latin American literature and a bicycling commuter. He will discuss “Minority Rights, Bicycle Justice: The Greening of the Americas from South to North,” Tuesday, April 12, at 7 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Kehr Union, Multicultural Center.

      Williams, who has taught at the University of California-Riverside since 1997, specializes in modern Latin American literature, with a concentrated focus on published fiction. His books cover topics such as the Colombian novel, postmodern fiction in Latin America, and the latest generation of writers associated with the “McOndo” and “Crack” generation born in the 1960s.

      His recent publications, related to literary and cultural studies, have been eco-critical approaches to modern Latin American fiction. He also co-authored a chapter, “Rascuache Cycling,” for the book, “Bike Justice.” The recipient of several Fulbright Scholarships to Colombia, Williams earned a bachelor’s degree from Washington State University and master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Kansas.

      Green Campus Initiative Spring Film Series

      Green Campus Initiative will continue to present its series of award-winning documentary films this semester, beginning late this month and concluding on the eve of Earth Day.

      • Bag It — Tuesday, March 29, 7 p.m. in 1303 McCormick Center. “Bag It” looks at plastic waste and its effects on “waterways, oceans and even our own bodies. We see how our crazy–for-plastic world has finally caught up with us and what we can do about it. Today. Right Now.”
      • Racing to Zero – In Pursuit of Zero Waste — Tuesday, April 12, 7 p.m. in 218 Centennial Hall. “Racing to Zero – In Pursuit of Zero Waste” reviews the efforts of the city of San Francisco to reduce its waste that is shipped to landfills to zero. These endeavors have already allowed the city to keep 78% of its garbage from going there. But only one third of the country’s rubbish is recycled or composted. The film looks at ways to change the perceptions of garbage so they are viewed as resources.
      • This Changes Everything Thursday, April 21, 7 p.m. in Gross Auditorium, Carver Hall. This Changes Everything's producers describe their documentary: “Filmed over 211 shoot days in nine countries and five continents over four years, “This Changes Everything” is an epic attempt to re-imagine the vast challenge of climate change. Inspired by Naomi Klein’s international non-fiction bestseller This Changes Everything, the film presents seven powerful portraits of communities on the front lines.… Interwoven with these stories of struggle is Klein’s narration, connecting the carbon in the air with the economic system that put it there. Throughout the film, Klein builds to her most controversial and exciting idea: that we can seize the existential crisis of climate change to transform our failed economic system into something radically better.”

      Former NFL punter to help kick off Ally Week

      Ally Week

      LGBTQA Student Services, Bloomsburg University Athletics, and the LGBTQA Commission is hosting former NFL football player Chris Kluwe as BU’s Ally Week kickoff speaker.

      Kluwe will be speaking on Monday, April 11, at 7 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom. Kluwe is most notable for his eight seasons with the Minnesota Vikings, where he set eight individual team records but had a tense relationship with the team owners and coaching staff due to his outspoken views supporting the LGBTQ community.

      Kluwe was released by the Vikings after the 2012 season, signed with the Oakland Raiders prior to the 2013 season, and was subsequently released. He was unable to sign on with another NFL team and retired from professional football in 2013.

      Kluwe has been an outspoken advocate for many social issues including LGBTQA rights, marriage equality, and gender non-discrimination in the video game industry and gamer communities. He will discuss the importance of speaking up and speaking out as an ally.

      Ally Week Activities

      • Monday, April 11 — Chris Kluwe in KUB Ballroom, 7 p.m.
      • Tuesday, April 12 — Potluck Dinner in Multi B at 6 p.m.
      • Wednesday, April 13 — PJ and Popcorn Party in Multi B at 7 p.m.
      • Thursday, April 14 — Queer Lunch with faculty, staff and students in the Scranton Commons at 11:45 a.m.
      • Thursday, April 14 — Drag Show in KUB Ballroom at 8 p.m.
      • Friday, April 15 — Sprit Day wear pride/ally apparel

      Do you need a ribbon or a new shirt to celebrate your support? Stop by this week, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in SSC Lobby

      Bush’s security adviser on “Facing the Storm"

      Dane Egli, national security adviser to former President George W. Bush, will pull back the curtain on America’s need to be more resilient in these complex and uncertain times during a speech Monday, April 11, at 7 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Centennial Hall, room 218. Egli’s lecture, “Facing the Storm: National Security Imperatives for 2016,” is open to the public free of charge. His talk is based on his 2014 book, “Beyond the Storms – Strengthening Homeland Security and Disaster Management to Achieve Resilience.”

      Currently national security strategist at Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Md., Egli has a broad range of experience in national security planning, homeland security, preparedness and resilience, international affairs, executive leadership, interagency coordination and effective communications.

      As director for counterterrorism from July 2004 to July 2006 during George W. Bush’s administration, he served as senior presidential adviser on counternarcotics and hostage rescue policies and chaired the 30-member Policy Coordination Committee-International Drug Control and the 20-member interagency Hostage Working Group.

      A message from President David Soltz

      I regret to inform you of the death of freshman Garet Schenker from Boalsburg. Garet was discovered unresponsive in his room in Montour Hall on Monday, April 4. No foul play is suspected. Despite the quick actions of emergency personnel, Garet did not regain consciousness and passed away Sunday, April 10, in Geisinger Medical Center. At this sad time, please remember help is available through our Counseling Center. Our thoughts are with Garet’s family and friends.

      Career Intensive Boot Camp nominations being accepted!

      Career Boot Camp

      Bloomsburg University’s Center for Professional Development and Career Experience (CPDCE) hosted its first-ever Career Intensive Boot Camp earlier this semester with 50 students participating in a variety workshops to include salary and benefit negotiation, office communication and adapting to change. BU faculty, alumni, and outside professionals helped students navigate these critical areas of their professional lives, launching them one step closer to their dream job.

      Among the participants was Taylor Albinson ‘15, a recent accounting graduate, who is now in a different stage of his professional career.

      “I wish I had more experiences like this during my time as an undergraduate,” Albinson said. “Even if they don’t know it yet, this opportunity has already given these undergraduate students an advantage over their peers, people who they will be competing with for jobs or internships."

      Taylor said the most beneficial workshop to him was “First Week on the Job: What to Expect,” taught by Erica Smith ’98, because “tips and advice for new employees are something that people don’t hear a lot, so it was nice to hear from successful professionals who have actually been in my shoes and are in positions now that I could see myself in.”

      Know a junior or senior who would benefit from our boot camp?

      Nominate them for a May Career Intensive Boot Camp in Philadelphia (May 16 to 19) or Harrisburg (May 23 to 26). To nominate a student contact lpolinski@bloomu.edu by Friday, April 15!

      Students must be a current student this summer and in good standing with the university. Special consideration will be given to students who are considered first generation or low income to accommodate students who may not have the funds to afford the registration fee. Students will receive:

      • Leather bound BU portfolio
      • Certificate of program completion
      • Full access to program materials during and following the boot camp
      • 1:1 resume review and interview feedback from Alumni and Staff
      • Networking opportunities during and after the boot camp with BU Alumni

      A big day for a big thank you!

      Another strong turnout for Community Government Association’s annual The Big Event, which featured roughly 2,000 volunteers this spring working 100-plus job sites.

      Among the locations included The First Presbyterian Church, Children’s Museum, Kocher Park and roughly 75 local residences.

      Student volunteers tackled a host of chores such as raking, painting, gardening, mulching, removing debris, digging and various spring-cleaning duties.

      Sponsored by the CGA, the single-day community service event gives students the opportunity to say “thank you" to Bloomsburg area residents and show appreciation for the community we live, learn and work in.

      BU observes Career in Aging Week

      When Did I Get Old?

      The documentary, “When Did I Get Old? Reflections on Aging Today,” will be shown Friday, April 8, at 5 p.m. in Bloomsburg University’s Greenly Center, 50 E. Main St. The film screening, open to the public free of charge, is part of BU’s observance of the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education’s (AGHE) Career in Aging Week.

      The film, produced by WFYI, Indianapolis, explores what individuals and communities can do to help minimize rough spots in the aging process, maximize opportunities for older individuals, and make communities more elder-friendly. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion about the film and how the local community can best meet the needs of its older residents.

      Also planned is Advocacy, Connections and Empowerment for Older Adults, a career and community expo on Thursday, April 7, from 2 to 5 p.m. in Monty’s. Offered in conjunction with the BU’s aging studies and gerontology minor, the career expo is an opportunity for BU students to network with professionals who work directly to meet the needs of older adults.

      Career in Aging Week promotes the range of career opportunities in aging and aging research. AGHE is the educational unit of the Gerontological Society of America.

      Cheerleading Team hosts tryouts this weekend

      Cheerleading Team

      Bloomsburg University's Cheerleading Team is hosting tryouts on Saturday, April 9, at 8:30 a.m., and Sunday, April 10, at 9 a.m. in the Nelson Field House. Must be present for both tryout practice on April 9 and tryouts on April 10 to be eligible to earn a spot on the team.

      Cheerleaders cheer at home football and basketball games along with the orientation pep rally and other on campus events. The team consists of 24 students. All team members have to re-tryout, which leaves 20 spots open.

      Cheerleaders practice twice a week and come back a week early from summer break to start their season.

      Venezuelan poet to share her works

      Poetry Reading

      A Venezuelan poet who has written more than 20 volumes will share her works during “Encounter with the Poet Julieta León: Poetry, Diversity, Community and Translation” on Thursday, April 7, at 6 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Kehr Union, Fireside Lounge.

      Born in Caracas, Venezula, León earned a degree in letters and received an international prize in 2005 for her collection of poems, “Mall.” Her most recent books are “Aquas de Santa Fe” and “Eterna Sed.”

      BU's Department of Languages and Cultures students and faculty have put together the program, including readings by León and translations of her poetry by students into different languages. The evening also includes a roundtable discussion, including members of the River Poets, on the topics of poetry, translation, culture and diversity.

      Symposium illustrates pathway to careers

      Liberal Arts Symposium

      “People are defined by what they carry, both physically and intellectually,” said James Brown, dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Bloomsburg University. “The liberal arts is like a Swiss Army knife that contains all of the tools you need as you set out on your journey.”

      BU’s College of Liberal Arts is sponsoring its first symposium Thursday and Friday, March 31 and April 1, to illustrate how the “tools” of a liberal arts education lead to personal and professional success. The symposium is designed to help students explore career pathways, understand diverse viewpoints and approaches to knowledge, and apply academic learning to the real world, Brown said. The symposium will include two keynote presentations, both open to the public free of charge.

      • Matthew B. Crawford, author of “Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work” and “The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in the Age of Distraction,” will speak Thursday, March 31, at 4 p.m. in Centennial Hall, room 218. Crawford, who majored in physics as an undergraduate and earned a doctoral degree in political philosophy, holds a writing fellowship at the University of Virginia’s Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture and operates a motorcycle repair shop in Richmond, Va. He will sign copies of his books following his lecture.
      • Shakti Butler, president and founder of World Trust Educational Services, will present a talk Friday, April 1, at 1 p.m. in McCormick Center, room 1303, as part of the symposium and the social work spring professional development expo, “Pathways to Change: Compassionate Conversations on Race and Diversity.” Butler is the producer and director of documentaries, including “The Way Home,” “Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible” and “Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity” that provide the framework for conversations about racial justice and equity.

      The symposium also will encompass a keynote panel discussion on poverty at the local level on Thursday, March 31, at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, room 218. Presented as part of the Institute for Culture and Society series, “Bloomsburg Explores Poverty,” the panel moderated by Heather Feldhaus, professor of sociology and the director of BU’s Center for Community Research and Consulting, will feature Joy McGinnis, Columbia County Volunteers in Medicine; President Judge Thomas James; and Rich Kisner, Columbia County Housing Authority. The program is open to the public.

      Dance Ensemble ready for Spring Showcase

      Dance Ensemble Spring Showcase

      Bloomsburg University’s Dance Ensemble will be hosting their spring showcase this week in the Haas Center for Performing Arts, offering more than 10 styles of dance ranging from Hip Hop to ballet.

      The Dance Ensemble — the largest student-run organization on campus with more than 150 active members — features student teachers of the different classes who put together a short audition piece for the potential members. The teachers then create the class and classes will begin the week after auditions.

      Typically classes are an hour each week depending on what the individual decides to join. Alongside the ensemble is the Bloomsburg Dance Team that creates both a Hip Hop and jazz piece that will be brought to the competitive stage in the spring semester. The team also dances at sporting events at the university. The spring showcase, Thursday, March 31, and Friday, April 1, will bring the stage to life as the dancers take the stage by storm. The event is free and open to the public.

      The Voice becomes The Void … this week

      The Voice Online

      The Void, the annual spoof issue of The Voice, hits campus today featuring stories on Carver Hall coming down for impending Disney-inspired Roongo's Castle, President Soltz banishing Bs in a personal campaign, plus an interview with Trump's infamous hair and a report on the Phila 76ers trading away the entire roster.

      Inside, traditional stories this edition include a look at study abroad in light of terrorist attacks in Europe. The sports section will an interview with Meredith Endy, of the tennis team.

      Annual International Diversity Festival

      International Festival

      Bloomsburg University's annual International Diversity Festival will be held on Friday, April 1, with a theme Celebration of Cultural Diversity around the world.

      There will be international cuisine, music, fashion show, talent show and the like. International cuisine is the test of ethnic food from different cultures (Dinner). Fashion show is a presentation of the traditional and national dresses of students from their home countries.

      Talent show is a showcase of talents based on their home cultures. The songs and dances are an excellent presentation of the various cultures, arts and the aesthetics that the students bring with them.

      Empty Bowls to help fill local Food Cupboard

      Empty Bowls Banquet

      Empty Bowls 2016, hosted by Bloomsburg University’s Center for Leadership and Engagement, aims to fill the empty bowls of individuals around the community who are in need of food.

      The event will be held on Sunday, April 3, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Kehr Union Ballroom. A minimum donation of $10 for adults and $5 for attendees under 17 years old is requested for unlimited soup tasting. Children 4 and under eat free.

      At the event, guests are invited to taste a variety of soups. Participants will also have the opportunity to purchase art pieces created locally. Baked goods will be available for sale and a children’s activity corner will be provided.

      All proceeds of BU’s Empty Bowls 2016 go to the Bloomsburg Food Cupboard to end hunger in the local area.

      New partnership on concussion testing

      Concussion Research and Services

      Geisinger's Orthopaedic Institute, Division of Sports Medicine, has designated Bloomsburg University’s Institute for Concussion Research and Service as its standard of care to assist in determining when a student athlete who is diagnosed with a concussion can safely return to the playing field. Geisinger Sports Medicine physicians will utilize testing within Bloomsburg University for further assessment of concussion symptoms.

      “They will rely on BU to provide additional assessment results,” said Joseph Hazzard, director of both the institute and BU’s clinical athletic training program. “These results will enhance their clinical decision making ability, especially as it relates to return-to-play.”

      The partnership not only provides a high level of care for local student athletes, but it also gives students enrolled in BU’s graduate-level clinical athletic training program hands-on experience conducting assessments in the institute’s lab, located in Centennial Hall.

      “This agreement will further the understanding of sports-related concussions,” said BU President David L. Soltz. “The designation is another example of the strong partnership between Bloomsburg University and the Geisinger Health System.”

      CVPA symposium maps career paths

      A Bloomsburg University alumnus who appears in the popular Netflix show, “Orange is the New Black,” and the executive director of a digital arts studio will illustrate career opportunities for students with a liberal arts background on Thursday, March 17, during “Breaking Ground: Building Careers through the Arts.” The event is the first symposium sponsored by BU’s Center for Visual and Performing Arts (CVPA).

      Graphic artist and photographer Mark Heaps, executive director for Houndstooth Studio, Austin, Texas, will present the symposium’s opening keynote address at 9:30 a.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. Houndstooth Studio specializes in creating engaging experiences through digital and analog interactivity.

      Actor James McMenamin, a 2001 BU graduate, will present the evening keynote address at 5 p.m. in Carver Hall, K.S. Gross Auditorium. McMenamin, who portrays corrections officer Charlie “Donuts” Coates in “Orange is the New Black,” also appeared on the seventh season of “Nurse Jackie” and in a film currently in post-production, “The Long Home,” with James Franco and Ashton Kutcher.

      Both keynote addresses and the reception to celebrate the opening of the “Breaking Ground” exhibit, beginning at 6 p.m. in the Gallery at Greenly Center, 50 E. Main St., are open to the public free of charge.

      BU’s College of Liberal Arts formed the CVPA to provide a link between the university and the community. The symposium, which includes alumni panel discussions and presentations, aims to help students understand how their arts education can lead to a career and be a part of their life after graduation.

      Breaking Ground – Careers in the Arts

      Bloomsburg University's Celebrity Artist Series will host an art exhibit in conjunction with the Center for Visual and Performing Arts symposium: Breaking Ground – Careers in the Arts. The exhibit, in the Reception Gallery at Haas Center, will open Thursday, March 17 at 9 a.m.

      The exhibit features works from Dave Ashby; Jeff McGreevy; and Gail Fox. All three are working artists who’ve either attended BU or who have a degree from Bloomsburg University. None of the three majored in Art, yet have chosen visual art as their profession. The exhibit runs thru April 6.

      FOCUS arrives for Palm Sunday

      Bethel Deliverance International

      Bloomsburg University’s Office of Minority Affairs will be hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, March, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center for fellowship and blessings on Palm Sunday. Free breakfast starting at 10:45 a.m. If you would like to take part in the program please contact Marcei Woods at 570-389-4091 for details.

      Cyber defense team advances in NCCDC

      Putting its network, security and hacking skills to test, the Bloomsburg Cyber Defense Club recently reached unprecedented success in the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition against 33 other universities in the Mid-Atlantic Regional qualifier. Bloomsburg University advanced to the regional finals for the first time ever, where it will compete against seven other teams later this month.

      “This is the most stressful, engaging, and skillful competition we’re able to participate in,” said Daniel Pany, team captain. “Most of our members have taken part in every other competition available to our majors, which all seem like a walk in the park compared to this one.”

      Competing with Pany are fellow digital forensics majors Mike Frauenhoffer, Jesse Mancuso, Kyle Mumper, Ben Tice, Dylan Sperber, Erik Josuweit, Josh Meyers, Megan Haggerty, Mike Martino, Joe Oriel and Vince Phan. According to Pany, the team has kept busy this school year by competing in the CSI CyberSeed, GrrCon Social Engineering and Hacking competitions, as well as participating in BU’s first vulnerability assessment of a company, "The Textron Project,“ this past fall and its inaugural BloomCon last month. These experiences led to the team’s success in CCDC’s qualifier round, Pany added.

      Ready for the Primary Election?

      Voter Registration

      Soon, it will be time to “get out and vote!” But first you must be registered. For those first-time voters and out-of-state students looking to participate in Pennsylvania’s Primary Election on April 26, Bloomsburg University is hosting a registration drive Tuesday, March 22, at several location across campus.

      Why is this election key? For a majority of college students this will be their first Presidential Election.

      “It is crucial that college students get out and vote because we are inheriting this country,” said Carissa Jones, president of Bloomsburg University’s College Republicans. “The next president will make choices that will influence the nation for centuries to come, and it is necessary that students are choosing level-headed leaders who will make wise decisions.”

      BU’s campus drives will give the students an opportunity to register to vote during the upcoming elections. As long as students are living in Pennsylvania they’re able to register with their current Bloomsburg address, even if they’re registered back home in a different state. If not, students will need to travel home next month and again in November to vote. Voting is an important privilege in the democratic process and even more so during a presidential year, according to Jones.

      “There are many relevant issues that affect college students,” Jones said. “Right now student debt is a major issue, one that candidates are taking to heart. Students need to examine proposals to lower the price of colleges that are reasonable in nature.”

      Voter Registration

      • Scranton Commons - 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
      • KUB - 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
      • McCormick Center 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
      • Student Services Center - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

      Anyone who is eligible and wishes to register or change registration in preparation to vote in the upcoming primary election is welcome. Time is running out. This is the last full week if you wish to vote in the primary in April.

      Time to unplug, State System competition begins

      PASSHE Unplugged

      This week, Bloomsburg University begins its 21-day energy saving competition PASSHE Unplugged against East Stroudsburg, Edinboro, IUP, Lock Haven, Millersville, Shippensburg, Slippery Rock, and West Chester.

      The goal is to reduce BU's electrical consumption by a measurable percentage, compared to a baseline period before spring break. BU is spearheading the competition, and a team of students, faculty, and staff will be promoting it over the next three weeks.

      How you can help!

      • Turn off your office equipment and lights when not in use.
      • Turn off LCD projectors when you leave a classroom – the bulb consumes 325 watts!
      • Spread the word to students. Their sheer numbers can make small efforts add up.
      • Keep an eye on the Live Electric Power gauge (to the left). We want to keep the color green.
      • Consider requesting automatic shutdown for lab computers that you control.

      Intramural Registration now open!

      One more season, one more chance to win your Championship Shirt!!! You can now register your team for Spring II Sports! If you do not have a team, you can still register as an individual and the Intramural Department will try and place you on a team.

      There is are multiple sports leagues for you to play this season; 3 on 3 Basketball, Bubble Soccer, Dodgeball, Field Hockey, Flag Football, Soccer, Softball, Ultimate Frisbee, and Volleyball. Registration deadline is Tuesday March 22. Register online or through your Rec*It app.

      Questions please contact Intramural Director Tony Dreckman, adreckma@bloomu.edu, 570-389-5289.

      An even bigger Big Event?

      Coming off its largest effort ever, Bloomsburg University’s annual The Big Event returns this spring with plans to eclipse its 2,000-plus volunteer turnout last year. A new feature that should help recruitment, according to the Community Government Association, is HuskySync’s online registration tool allowing students to easily sign up for community clean up on Saturday, April 2.

      “I like to think of The Big Event as the ultimate act of neighborly kindness,” says Patrick Berridge, CGA vice president. “It’s huge for CGA, because this one day exemplifies who we are as an organization and ends up representing of both the students and university as a whole by giving back to the town.”

      The Big Event began in 2008 as a way for BU students to say “thank you” to the Town of Bloomsburg and its residents — neighbors of the university and students, who live on and off campus. Among the variety of projects students take on include raking, painting, digging and cleaning. Students can sign up as a group or individually. Deadline to register is Friday, March 18. All participants receive a free T-shirt.

      “I can still remember my very first Big Event and how amazing I felt afterwards,” Berridge said. “It’s an incredible feeling when you look around and see thousands of students in bright colored shirts gathered with you for this event.”

      Abroad trip leading to future Huskies?

      Sinapore Percussion

      Getting away from campus for spring break isn’t just for students.

      Just ask Gifford Howarth, associate professor of music, who spent the week in Singapore presenting a series of percussion workshops with different music organizations in the country.

      They included the National University of Singapore (NUS), the Singapore School of the Arts (SOTA), and the Singapore Wind Symphony (SWS).

      Over the past five years, Howarth has taught and performed in Singapore and has developed some nice relationships with the organizations there. During this most recent trip, Howarth presented information to students in Singapore about the possibility of them doing a “semester abroad” at Bloomsburg University. This new venture came about through communications between BU’s Office of Admissions and Office of Global and Multicultural Education.

      Leaders honored as part of Husky Summit celebration

      Legacy Leaders

      Concluding the 10th anniversary of Bloomsburg University’s Husky Student Leadership Summit, the second annual Legacy of Leadership Banquet honored its latest class of student and alumni leaders.

      This celebration marks an important occasion as we realize the vision for the Center for Leadership and Engagement,” said Dione Somerville, vice president for student affairs. “In fall of 2013, we opened the center, recognizing our students needed the resources and opportunities to further develop their leadership skills and broaden their understanding of how they are all leaders in a society of ever-growing complexity.”

      Since then, the CLE has enrolled more than 1,055 students in its Leadership Certification Program, conducted more than 200 leadership workshops, has begun providing support to BU’s 272 active student organizations, conducted three student leadership retreats, and had thousands of students participate in civic engagement activities.

      Legacy of Leadership Awards

      • Legacy of Leadership — Kristen Koveleski Stepanczuk ’07 and Amy Cunningham ‘92
      • Outstanding Student Award Mentor Award — Page Herto, Alexandra Wheatley
      • Student Organization Advisor of the Year — Madelyn Rodriguez ’95, advisor for the Student Organization of Latinos
      • Student Organization of the Year Award — National Student Speech Language and Hearing Association
      • The Dr. H. Preston Herring Scholarship — Delaney Hellman

      Husky Student Leadership Summit

      Husky Leadership Summit

      Celebrity keynote speaker Hoan Do — a student success coach, author, and competitor on NBC’s American Ninja Warrior — commenced the 10th annual Husky Student Leadership Summit with his personal story, “A cheerleading dance, and motivational words to young leaders” at Bloomsburg University’s recent annual Husky Student Leadership Summit.

      Professional development workshops led by faculty, alumni and Hoan Do included resume writing and review, internship and graduate resources, and a one-on-one branding and consultation meeting.

      More than 300 students took advantage of the summit’s wide variety of offerings to tailor the day to meet their professional development needs by selecting from a list of 20 workshops. BU’s Center for Professional Development and Career Experience (CPDCE) also provided a professional headshot service, which was a popular destination throughout the day.

      “I’m graduating in two months, so I want to take advantage of everything I can before I am thrown into the real world,” said Adam Schultz, a senior. “You don’t get to attend workshops and conferences like this once you leave college. You’re pretty much on your own. Why would I want to leave here knowing I didn’t take advantage of every opportunity that was available?“

      At the end of the day, attendees received a signed copy of Hoan Do’s book, “How to Succeed in the Real World: What School Won’t Teach You,” and had the opportunity to network with alumni and professionals they met throughout the day.

      BUET has strong showing to start spring season

      Equestrian Team

      Bloomsburg University’s Equestrian Team (English Showing Team) won Fourth Place against several PASSHE schools at their first show of the spring semester. The Intercollegiate Horse Show Association event (IHSA) was hosted by Rutgers and Moravian University at Alexandria Township Park in Milford, N.J. BUET placed ahead of the University of Scranton, Moravian University, Kutztown University, Lehigh University, Lafayette University, and Princeton University.

      There were several rides by each team members and their placings per class are the following:

      • Tara Kennedy placed first in Novice Fences on Taboo and first in Intermediate Flat on Hercules. Tara was announced as the High Point Rider of the day during the ride off on Einstein
      • Kim Fiedler (Captain) placed sixth on Bob for both Open Fences & Open Flat
      • Ashley Rivera (President) placed fifth in Open Flat on Sage
      • Erica Grater (Co-Captain) place fourth on Jimmy in Intermediate Flat
      • Christina Knight (Vice President) placed sixth on Saint in Novice Fences
      • Lexi Toburen placed first on Trinity in Novice and fifth on Pache for Novice Flat
      • Jessica Shiptoski (Treasurer) placed second on Po in Novice Fences and fourth on Comet in Novice Flat
      • Katie Laubach placed sixth on Comet in Novice Fences and first on Typhoon in Novice Flat
      • Lauren Apple placed second on Jimmy in Novice Flat
      • Sara Hess placed first on Taboo in Advanced Walk-Trot- Canter
      • Logan Carpenter placed first on Taboo in Advanced Walk-Trot-Canter
      • Ali Mazack placed first in Beginner Walk-Trot-Canter
      • Steven Smith placed fifth on Mystery in Beginner Walk-Trot
        • Honorable team mentions include Amie Radar, Emily Ferguson, Camille Sierka, Morgan Murphy, and Brandy Riegel.

          An out-of-state spring break delivery

          Flint Water Drive

          It is not uncommon for college students to embark on a road trip for spring break. It is, however, when they head away from the beach in a delivery truck.

          That’s just what Vince Phan, president of Bloomsburg University’s Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, and Abu Kaba, a member of BU’s African Student Association, are doing this weekend. After collecting more than 60 cases of water for the citizens of Flint, Mich., last week, the two student leaders are making sure their campus water drive collection will be hand delivered.

          “We chose to help Flint, because it was a crisis in our own country,” said Phan, also president of BU’s Student United Way. “Also, what the people in Flint are going through isn’t something you could say we can live without. Water is a very much needed necessity for us as humans to have in life.”

          PA Secretary of Banking and Securities hails BU participation

          National Bank Competition

          PA Secretary of Banking and Securities Robin L. Wiessmann recently praised students at Bloomsburg University for being the first to represent Pennsylvania in the national Community Bank Case Study Competition. The Community Bank Case Study Competition, sponsored by the Conference of State Bank Supervisors (CSBS), is a nationwide team competition for undergraduate college students with an interest in banking and finance.

          Under the guidance of Professor Victoria Geyfman, two teams of Bloomsburg students will partner with First Columbia Bank & Trust Company and Mid Penn Bank to conduct original case studies to assess the impact of the banks’ small business lending efforts.

          “Community banks are vital to our commonwealth’s financial and economic health,” said Wiessmann. “Emerging research on these banks helps Pennsylvania’s financial and economic development efforts, builds a further understanding of the community banking business model, and stresses the role community banks play in the communities they serve. Congratulations to Professor Geyfman, her students, our two state-chartered banks, and Bloomsburg University for rising to meet this challenge.”

          Outstanding Teacher Award

          Know an outstanding teacher? Nominate yours for the TALE Outstanding Teacher Award anytime between now and Monday, April 11, by 4 p.m. If you will be graduating in May, either undergraduate or graduate, you are invited to nominate one professor for the Outstanding Teacher Award via iit.bloomu.edu/award.

          There will be details regarding writing the narrative indicating why this person is deserving of the award as it relates to his or her effectiveness as a teacher. All nominations will be kept confidential. December nominations will be combined with May/August graduates’ nominations and the two winners will be announced at the May graduation ceremonies.

          The selected professor will learn of the award selection by the end of April and will receive a plaque and monetary award at the appropriate graduation ceremony. Thank you for taking the time to acknowledge a professor who has had an impact on your learning at Bloomsburg University.

          National Student Employment Appreciation Week

          Bloomsburg University will celebrate National Student Employment Appreciation Week next month.

          • Monday, April 4, — all student workers and their supervisors are invited for a free grilled hot dog and Rita’s Ice on the patio at 11:30 a.m. in front of the Student Services Center.
          • Wednesday, April 6 — teams of student employees and supervisors are invited to participate in the Tenth Annual Team Challenge, from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center. Suitable for one and all, the course involves fun and creative activities. One lucky team will win a free luncheon worth up to $100, courtesy of John Loonan, vice president of administration.
          • Thursday, April 7 — nominees for 2015-16 Student Employee of the Year will be recognized at a luncheon, noon in the Kehr Union Building.

          Bloomsburg’s 2015-16 Student Employee of the Year is Jordan Vitkauskas, a senior mass communications major, who works as a sports information assistant for the Office of Marketing and Communications. Vitkauskas receives a $500 scholarship funded by the Bloomsburg University Foundation. Second place finisher is Hakeem Thomas, a senior criminal justice major, who works as a veterans’ assistant for the Office of Military Resources. Thomas receives a $200 University Store gift card.

          Student EOY Nominees: Rebecca J. Anderson, Nursing; Gabrielle Balaguer, DAWN Office; Abigail Brown, University Honors Program; Meaghan Eckel, COST Dean's Office; Margaret Erdman, Office of the President; Rain Escovedo, Center for Professional Development and Career Experience; Ashley Gildner, Student Activities; Amy Heintz, Technology Support Services; Mollie Kile, Admissions; Mary Rose Latorre, Financial Aid; Brandi Sherwood, Nursing; Christopher Stackhouse, College of Business; Patricia Sullivan, Residence Life; Briana Taylor, Athletics; Hakeem Thomas, Military Resources; Jordan Vitkauskas, Sports Information; Rebecca Ward, Living Learning Communities; Alexis Wasko, University Honors Program.

          PSECU promotions for students

          PSECU

          PSECU is your on-campus credit union. They’re all about free – free checking, free mobile deposit service, surcharge-free ATMs right here on campus and more. And in recognition of your upcoming graduation, they have another money-saver for you. They’re putting money toward your grad gear! This promotion runs through May 6, and is open to current members, and those who apply for membership at the PSECU on-campus location during the promotional period. The vouchers are in limited supply, so stop by their location soon.

          For complete rules, visit psecu.com/gradgear and select Bloomsburg from the drop down menu.

          Join PSECU, Get $25

          Many money experts say that credit unions are a good deal for consumers. Because credit unions are not-for-profit financial cooperatives, they work for their member-owners, offering them low- or no-cost financial products and services.

          Since you’re a student at this school, one of PA’s largest credit unions has a special deal for you. When you join PSECU and satisfy the promotional requirements, you can get a $25 bonus. Visit psecu.com/25TOYOU to get all the promotion details and apply for membership. Students: You have the right to choose your banking relationship, and can continue using your current bank accounts.
          PSECU is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Equal Opportunity Lender.

          Spring Campus Construction Activity

          Lower Campus Construction

          Campus maps show the facilities planning and construction project sites for 2016. The intent of the general map is to identify the locations and dates that will be affected, as well as identify the project. As always, some projects will affect pedestrian and vehicular movements more than others. Those projects will be supplemented with additional phasing and traffic plans.

          As projects progress, larger more detailed maps will be provided as needed to communicate details in advance of the changes. The two projects with the most impact on pedestrian and vehicular movements are the new residence hall and bookstore, and the Centennial Hall steam and condensate line replacement.

          Forensics Team's spring semester off to solid start

          Forensics Speech Debate

          Bloomsburg University’s Forensics (Speech and Debate) Team won the Fourth Place Team Sweepstakes award out of eight schools at the Collegiate Forensic Association’s Annual Winter Tournament at the College of Charleston in Charleston, S.C. BU finished ahead of Lynchburg College, the University of Richmond, Lord Fairfax Community College, and Wilkes University. Five of the eight BU competitors won individual speaking and debate awards:

          • Anna Scott: first in poetry
          • Abbey Porambo: fourth in poetry, fourth in persuasion
          • Delaney Hellman: first in after dinner speaking, third in declamation, fifth in pentahlon, fourth in parliamentary debate team with Chanty Gbaye, fourth in best parliamentary debate speaker, sixth in impromptu, sixth in communication analysis
          • Jayleen Alvarado: fifth in persuasion
          • Chanty Gbaye: fourth in parliamentary debate team with Delaney Hellman

          In its next tournament, the Forensics Team won the Sixth Place Team Sweepstakes award out of 14 schools at the CFA Wilkes University Harold Cox Invitational Tournament. Five out of seven BU student competitors won individual speaking and debate awards at Wilkes University:

          • Deanna Campion: third in Lincoln-Douglass debate
          • Lucelis Ortega: fourth in parliamentary debate with Alisa Evans
          • Alisa Evans: fourth in Lincoln-Douglass debate with Lucelis Ortega
          • Delaney Hellman: second in parliamentary debate with Jayleen Alvarado, first in best parliamentary debate speaker, fourth in pentathlon
          • Jayleen Alvarado: second in parliamentary debate with Delaney Hellman, fourth in best parliamentary debate speaker, third in pentathlon

          Students, alumni connect for inaugural Career Boot Camp

          Career Boot Camp

          Bloomsburg University’s Center for Professional Development and Career Experience (CPDCE) recently hosted its first-ever Career Intensive Boot Camp with 50 students participating in a variety workshops to include salary and benefit negotiation, office communication and adapting to change. BU faculty, alumni, and outside professionals helped students navigate these critical areas of their professional lives, launching them one step closer to their dream job.

          Among the participants was Taylor Albinson ‘15, a recent accounting graduate, who is now in a different stage of his professional career.

          “I wish I had more experiences like this during my time as an undergraduate,” Albinson said. “Even if they don’t know it yet, this opportunity has already given these undergraduate students an advantage over their peers, people who they will be competing with for jobs or internships."

          Taylor said the most beneficial workshop to him was “First Week on the Job: What to Expect,” taught by Erica Smith ’98, because “tips and advice for new employees are something that people don’t hear a lot, so it was nice to hear from successful professionals who have actually been in my shoes and are in positions now that I could see myself in.”

          Looking for ways to leave your mark at BU?

          CGA Elections

          Consider joining the Community Government Association, which provides an opportunity to make the most out of your college career by participating in decision-making that impacts the university, meeting a wide variety of people, and developing leadership and teamwork skills.

          "Being a member of the CGA over the past three years has honestly been one of my best decisions at Bloomsburg,” said Rebecca DeMuth, CGA vice president. “ I have met some of my best friends, really sharpened my professional skills in leading teams, networking with administers, making formal proposals, and I've been able to make an impact on the surrounding community through the Big Event.”

          DeMuth said being a member of the CGA has brought my leadership skills to the next level, and has allowed me to see all that Bloomsburg University truly has to offer.

          Students can run for Secretary, Treasurer, Vice President, and President. If elected, you will partake in decision-making regarding the Kehr Union Building, late night, the shuttle service, the university bookstore, and more!

          CGA Senate Election Results

          • John Caserta, CGA president
          • Patrick Berridge, CGA vice president
          • Austin Devlin, CGA treasurer
          • Arden Shiller, CGA secretary

          STEM team wins regional Governor’s competition

          STEM Governors Competition

          A team of students from Bloomsburg University’s STEM Magnet Program recently won the regional PA Governor’s STEM Competition at the Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit in Milton, responding to the competition’s request to “Improve Pennsylvania through STEM.”

          BU’s team worked on its competition project, “Feed the Bees,” over winter break. They concentrated on the current decreasing bee population in Pennsylvania due to lack of nutrients in the state that is available to allow the bees to survive. To solve this issue, the team developed biodegradable paper containing the seeds of different flowers that bees consume in order to survive and thrive.

          The paper can be used as normal paper and then recycled after use by planting it in the ground. The team’s proposal included a distribution plan in order to effectively have the paper dispersed throughout the state.

          In addition, the team was required to partner with local STEM business in order to gain a general understanding of STEM opportunities in the area. Students were also able to job shadow over winter break with Seikisui-SPI and Autoneum NorthAmerica in Bloomsburg.

          Trustees approve fees for 2016-17

          Bloomsburg University’s Council of Trustees approved the student fee schedule for 2016-17 during the March 2 quarterly meeting. Included is a new $300-per-semester Student Success Fee, which will provide the means to maintain or expand high-quality programs and services in the face of uncertain funding from the commonwealth.

          The Trustees’ action will increase room and board fees, raising the cost of a traditional residence hall room by $188 per semester, apartment-style housing by $339 per semester, and the most common 14-meal plan with $200 Flex by $27 per semester. The Trustees also approved two new graduate-level certificate programs: the 18-credit Certificate of Management to be offered in Center City Philadelphia and Bloomsburg starting in fall 2016 and the 36-credit Certificate of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring Technology, available as an optional track since 2008, also scheduled to begin this fall.

          Also during the meeting:

          • Trustees approved a resolution commending BU President David Soltz and recommending extension of his contract by the State System.
          • Tom Fletcher, vice president of strategic enrollment and management and dean of extended programs, offered an overview of BU’s winter session. A total of 999 students, including 442 BU seniors and 288 BU juniors, earned 3,660 credits in courses offered online and in person.
          • Two retirees were honored for emeritus status: Barbara Wert, from the Department of Exceptionality Programs, faculty emeritus, and Richard Eye, Facility Services, non-instructional emeritus.

          Act 101 launches Act Now for Success!

          Act101 Workshops

          New this semester to Act 101/EOP is their Act Now for Success! workshop series. Every other Thursday will unravel different workshops covering general education requirements, financial aid, student clubs, declaring a major and much more.

          To start it off this seminar Act 101/EOP brought back alumni Victoria Wylie, who talked to the students about motivations strategies, as well as incorporating self-esteem and personal development.

          I learned a lot from her presentation,” said Nazeer Curry, an Act 101/EOP program assistant. “She has lupus and has not let that stop her from chasing her dreams. She is the definition of a hard worker and strategic thinker.”

          According to Curry, through this new after-hours program current Act 101/EOP students will be able to meet Act 101 alumni like Wylie and pick their brains about how to succeed after college.

          Teaming up for Relay for Life

          Colleges Against Cancer

          Bloomsburg University’s annual Relay for Life is among the largest fundraising events on campus each year, and two student organizations are making sure it stays that way.

          BU’s Colleges Against Cancer is hosting an adopt a flamingo fundraiser, where for a $20 donation sponsors get their own plastic flamingo to display on campus. Each flamingo will have a purple ribbon and either have a fact about cancer or can be donated in memory or in honor of a loved one who has fought against cancer.

          Also, the Ultimate Frisbee Club is teaming up with CAC to host a charity Ultimate Frisbee Hat Tournament on Sunday, April 3, to help raise money for the upcoming relay event. At the tournament participants can either sign up as an individual, with a partner or get split up into random teams. Registration fee of $20 and form is due by Saturday, March 12.

          Interested in a flamingo? Contact Olivia Tunall, CAC executive board member, by Wednesday, March 22. These special events are helping to promote the upcoming Relay for Life event being held in the Student Recreation Center on Saturday, April 9, from 5 p.m. to 5 a.m. CAC has already started fundraising by raising more than $6,700 with 39 teams and 201 participants registered. Last year they raised $52,000.

          Lights, camera … Freeze Frame!

          Freeze Fram Awards

          Bloomsburg University’s Department of Mass Communications and the National Broadcasting Society are teaming up to host the Freeze Frame awards on Saturday, April 23. Freeze frame is a BU student film video, website, and script based competition geared towards highlighting various skills in media.

          There will be 19 categories that BU students will be able to choose from and can only submit to three of them.

          Submissions are due by Saturday, March 21, with the link to the video, website, etc. along with a $5 submission fee payable to the mass communications front desk. Submissions will not qualify if the money is not received by Saturday, March 21.

          Freeze Frame Categories — News Package, Feature Package, Sports Package, Documentary Program, Public Affairs/Interview Program/Segment, News Feature Program, Magazine Program, Sports Program, Sports Play-By-Play Programming, Commercials/Promos/PSAs, Instructional/Industrial/Promotional Program, Music/Variety/Special Program or Segment, Music Video, Comedy Program or Segment, Drama Program, Magazine Editing and Production, Public Relations Case Study, and Web Design.

          COE foundation sets alumna up for teaching success

          Peddie School Teacher

          Meredith Salmon was taught students learn best by doing. A lesson learned at Bloomsburg University as an education major she now employs in her own classroom at one of the most prestigious college preparatory schools in country.

          “During the fall of my senior year, I completed a Professional Development Practicum at Central Columbia High School,” said Salmon ‘14, who teaches ninth grade Honors biology and tenth grade biology at the Peddie School, Highstown, N.J. “This first-hand experience allowed me to gain months of classroom time prior to my student teaching assignment with the same mentor and students in the spring.”

          According to Salmon, a lot of what she is responsible for as a Peddie faculty member she learned as a practicum student three years ago:

          • planning and teaching innovative lessons utilizing differentiated instructions
          • creating interactive laboratory activities
          • implementing classroom management strategies

          Salmon said collectively the practicum, student teaching experience, and valuable advice and guidance from College of Education professors all had an incredibly positive influence on her teaching career.

          BU joins nationwide concussion study

          Concussion Study

          Bloomsburg University will begin baseline concussion screening of student-athletes this summer after being selected earlier this month to join the NCAA-Department of Defense Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (C.A.R.E.) Consortium. The research will be led by Joseph Hazzard, director of the Institute for Concussion Research and Service and BU’s clinical athletic training education program.

          The study, now in its third year, includes 30 schools nationwide.

          All student-athletes at each participating school receive a comprehensive preseason evaluation for concussion and are monitored in the event of an injury. Data collected at each school is evaluated by a team of researchers led by Steven Broglio, director of the University of Michigan’s NeuroTrauma Research Laboratory; Michael McCrea, director of brain injury research at the Medical College of Wisconsin; and Tom McAllister, chair of the Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry.

          The researchers have collected more than 25 million data points from 16,000 student athletes at the 21 schools already participating, including the University of Pittsburgh, Virginia Tech, Princeton University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the U.S. military academies. After adding the nine new testing sites, researchers estimate more than 25,000 student athletes will take part over the course of the three-year study.

          “We are honored to be selected to participate in this innovative study,” said Michael McFarland, BU’s athletic director and co-investigator. “The entire Bloomsburg University athletic department is excited about this opportunity to research, study and improve return-to-play protocols for student athletes.”

          BU team wins CyberSEED documentary challenge

          Out of 30 schools — to include Brown, Penn State and Syracuse universities — it was Bloomsburg University’s documentary chosen as the best at the recent CyberSEED conference.

          Hosted by the Comcast Center of Excellence for Security Innovation at the University of Connecticut, CyberSEED brings together top information security professionals and business leaders to discuss emerging cybersecurity trends and formulate best strategies for tackling current and future threats. In the same academic setting, dozens of universities and colleges compete in unique cybersecurity challenges for prizes.

          “I personally went to the competition for the experience, and to participate in the documentary challenge,” said Rio Weber, a senior digital forensics major.

          In addition to the documentary challenge, BU students competed in capture the flag and social engineering competitions. To capture the flag, students were challenged to use an IT infrastructure that simulates the current threat of a landscape. In the social engineering competition, students were tested on receiving bits of information and proposed different policies with that information.

          Student group offers tax-filing help

          Tax-Filing Assistance

          Bloomsburg University's Student Accounting Association is again providing free tax help to low- to moderate-income individuals and families through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program. IRS-certified volunteers will provide free basic income tax preparation with electronic filing to people who generally make $54,000 or less, persons with disabilities, the elderly, and others who need assistance in preparing their own tax returns.

          There is a new location this year. Assistance will be available from 4 to 8 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from Feb. 8 to April 6 at The Greenly Center, 50 E. Main St., Bloomsburg. The site will be closed March 7, 8 and 9 for Spring Break. Also new this year, assistance will be available on two Saturdays — Feb. 27 and March 19 — at Wesley United Methodist Church, 130 W. Third St., Bloomsburg.

          Volunteers, trained and certified by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), will prepare and e-file federal, state and local income tax returns at no cost for eligible taxpayers. Volunteer training included the Earned Income Tax Credit, the Child Tax Credit, Education Credits, and the Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled.

          Survey seeks opinions of freshmen, seniors

          NSSE Survey

          Each member of Bloomsburg University’s first-year and senior classes is invited to share opinions about his or her experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). According to Sheila Dove Jones, assistant vice president for planning and assessment, answers to the online survey will reveal students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results will be used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

          Jones said several email messages containing a link to the survey will be sent to BU’s freshmen and seniors in February and March. She encourages students to respond by April 15.

          In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey by April 15 will be entered automatically into a random drawing to win one of two Amazon gift cards valued at $150, one of four Amazon gift cards valued at $100, one of two Amazon gift cards valued at $50 or one of 43 Bloomsburg University insignia prizes worth $5 to $30. A student’s chances of winning depends on how many students complete the survey; the last time this survey was administered about 985 students responded. Based on this estimate, the odds of winning are 1 in 19. The Web version of the survey is available at nssesurvey.org.

          “All student responses are valuable for helping us compare the experiences they report with those of students at hundreds of other colleges and universities,” Jones said. “The results will also indicate important trends in undergraduate education. More voices will make the results more valid.”

          Approximately 4,000 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 541 U.S. colleges and universities and 315,000 first-year students and seniors participated in the 2015 survey.

          Green Campus Initiative Spring Film Series

          Green Campus Initiative will continue to present its series of award-winning documentary films this semester, beginning late this month and concluding on the eve of Earth Day.

          • Bag It — Tuesday, March 29, 7 p.m. in 1303 McCormick Center. “Bag It” looks at plastic waste and its effects on “waterways, oceans and even our own bodies. We see how our crazy–for-plastic world has finally caught up with us and what we can do about it. Today. Right Now.”
          • Racing to Zero – In Pursuit of Zero Waste — Tuesday, April 12, 7 p.m. in 218 Centennial Hall. “Racing to Zero – In Pursuit of Zero Waste” reviews the efforts of the city of San Francisco to reduce its waste that is shipped to landfills to zero. These endeavors have already allowed the city to keep 78% of its garbage from going there. But only one third of the country’s rubbish is recycled or composted. The film looks at ways to change the perceptions of garbage so they are viewed as resources.
          • This Changes Everything Thursday, April 21, 7 p.m. in Gross Auditorium, Carver Hall. This Changes Everything's producers describe their documentary: “Filmed over 211 shoot days in nine countries and five continents over four years, “This Changes Everything” is an epic attempt to re-imagine the vast challenge of climate change. Inspired by Naomi Klein’s international non-fiction bestseller This Changes Everything, the film presents seven powerful portraits of communities on the front lines.… Interwoven with these stories of struggle is Klein’s narration, connecting the carbon in the air with the economic system that put it there. Throughout the film, Klein builds to her most controversial and exciting idea: that we can seize the existential crisis of climate change to transform our failed economic system into something radically better.”

          Challenging misperceptions about mental illness

          Mental Illness Panel

          Hear panelist discuss issues, challenges and triumphs of mental illnesses on Wednesday, March 30, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the KUB Multipurpose Room B at Bloomsburg University.

          The panel will include regional experts in the field of mental health treatment as well as individuals from the community commenting on living with mental illness. During the forum, there will also be a dramatic presentation regarding the lived experience of being mentally ill.

          This panel forum for the campus community is sponsored by the Department of Nursing, College of Science and Technology and the McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support, as well as the College of Education.

          Annual International Diversity Festival

          International Festival

          Bloomsburg University's annual International Diversity Festival will be held on Friday, April 1, with a theme Celebration of Cultural Diversity around the world.

          There will be international cuisine, music, fashion show, talent show and the like. International cuisine is the test of ethnic food from different cultures (Dinner). Fashion show is a presentation of the traditional and national dresses of students from their home countries. Talent show is a showcase of talents based on their home cultures. The songs and dances are an excellent presentation of the various cultures, arts and the aesthetics that the students bring with them.

          Seats are limited and only by reservation (first come basis) no walk in. Cost for BU student $10 and faculty and others $20.

          Scholar discusses economic inequality

          Gregory Mankiw

          Economics scholar N. Gregory Mankiw, who was appointed chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers by former President George W. Bush, will come to Bloomsburg University on Thursday, April 14, as a guest speaker for the Department of Economics.

          Mankiw will discuss “The Rise in Economic Inequality: Causes and Cures” in his lecture at 2 p.m. in Haas Center of the Arts, Mitrani Hall. Admission for the lecture is free and open to the public.

          A professor of economics at Harvard University, Mankiw teaches macroeconomics, microeconomics, statistics, and principles of economics. In addition to serving as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, he was a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, adviser to the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and the Congressional Budget Office, and member of the Educational Testing Service’s test development committee for the advanced placement exam in economics.

          Along with his two textbooks, “Principles of Economics,” which sold more than 1 million copies in 20 languages, and “Macroeconomics,” Mankiw has published articles in the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Quarterly Journal of Economics, and public forums, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and Fortune. Mankiw received his Bachelor of Arts in economics in 1980 at Princeton University and earned his doctorate in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1984. His research includes work on price adjustment, consumer behavior, financial markets, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

          ICS explores poverty in the old South

          Old South

          Jennifer Oast, associate professor of history at Bloomsburg University, examines the economic and psychological impact of the system of slavery in a lecture, “Slaves of the Poor Whites in the Old South.” The lecture will be on Thursday, March 3, at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, room 218. Admission is free and open to the public.

          “When most imagine southern slaveholders, they think of upper-class whites on prosperous plantations. But poor whites also became masters of slaves, and many more were the indirect beneficiaries of slavery,” Oast said.

          The lecture is part of the Institute for Culture and Society’s Bloomsburg Explores Poverty symposium, aimed at increasing awareness of poverty throughout the ages while encouraging members of the campus community to become involved in organizing activities during the academic year.

          Additional programs this semester, each followed by a question-and-answer session led by BU faculty members, are listed below. Each starts at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, room 218.

          Bloomsburg Explores Poverty

          • Panel discussion, “Poverty at the Local Level” with Joy E. McGinnis, Columbia County Volunteers in Medicine; Columbia County President Judge Thomas James; and Rich Kissner, Columbia County Housing Authority; Thursday, March 31; led by Heather Feldhaus, professor, sociology, social work and criminal justice
          • Documentary, “Price We Pay,” Thursday, April 7, led by Safa Saracoglu, associate professor of history
          • Panel discussion, “We Come as Friends,” Thursday, April 14, led by Mark Usry, associate professor, business education, information technology management
          • Lecture, “A Rural Reconsideration of the Subculture of Violence Hypothesis,” Thursday, April 21, led by Bob Moschgat, assistant professor, sociology, social work and criminal justice
          • Lecture, “The Effects of Poverty on Language and Literacy Development,” Thursday, April 28, led by Patricia Lawton, assistant professor, audiology and speech pathology

          Women's Consortium to honor BU women

          Women's History Month

          In celebration of National Women’s History Month, the Bloomsburg University Women’s Consortium is honoring the contributions of BU women through this year’s theme, “Working to Create a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government.”

          The consortium is taking nominations this week.

          “Our mission with recognition award is to help people acknowledge those BU women who have worked to establish the university as a stronger, welcoming community,” said Denise Chaytor- Zugarek, of the Woman’s Consortium Planning Committee, adding nominees would be women who contribute in positive ways through, mentoring, service, leadership, and or scholarship, as well as students who are excellent role models for colleagues and other students.

          According to Zugarek, the consortium connects woman faculty, students, staff and administrators from the 14 campuses of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

          “We build and nurture these connections through an annual fall conference, our Summer Leadership Institutes, by supporting woman and gender studies and campus Woman’s Center on the PASSHE campuses,” Zugarek said.

          New residence hall brings ‘wow’ factor

          Residence Hall Project

          An external gathering space with a fire pit. A second-story outdoor plaza. Two lounges on every floor. And a “green” roof with sustainable, low-maintenance plants. Just a few of the “wow” factors built into plans for Bloomsburg University’s new residence hall, set to open in August 2017 at the site of the former University Store Building.

          Demolition of the University Store Building began in January 2016, after the store relocated to Kehr Union, Mailroom Services moved to Elwell Hall and the BU Police Department began operating out of new headquarters at the rear of Andruss Library.

          Construction of the university’s first, intentional multi-use building will be completed by August 2017, in time for the hall’s first 398 residents to move in.

          Record gift establishes Center for SCM

          Nicholas Giuffre Gift

          The largest gift in the history of the Bloomsburg University Foundation is benefiting BU’s supply chain management program.

          Nicholas J. Giuffre ’78 recently contributed a $2.5 million blended gift to the BU Foundation and the university’s It’s Personal campaign. The gift establishes the Nicholas J. Giuffre Center for Supply Chain Management within the College of Business.

          His gift will also endow the Nicholas J. Giuffre Distinguished Professor in Supply Chain Management to support the university’s supply chain management major and experiential learning opportunities for students. It is the first endowed professorship in the College of Business.

          “The support of our alumni is vital to our mission and to the impact we have on our students,” said BU President David Soltz. “We can’t thank Nick enough for this generous gift, which will be transformational to the College of Business and our university. It will give our students a distinct advantage by further developing our supply chain management program.”

          The Legacy of Matthew Shephard

          Judy Shepard

          Judy Shephard, a grieving mother, is speaking to to audiences nationwide after her son was brutally attacked for being gay. Shepard will be raising awareness and discussing how to make schools and communities saver for everyone on Monday, Feb 29, at 6 p.m. in HAAS Center for the Performing Arts at Bloomsburg University.

          On Oct. 8, 1998, Shephard and her husband Dennis were awakened in the middle of the night by a telephone call no parent should ever have to receive. What they heard changed their lives forever. There eldest son, Matthew, was in a coma after falling victim to a hate crime. She is taking her story and teaching others that regardless of their race, sex, religion, or sexual orientation they can find ways to stay save on and off campus.

          The event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by The Multicultural Center and co-sponsored by CLE, LGBTQA Resource Center, and LGBTQA Commission.

          A taste of the arts this weekend

          Taste of the Arts

          A Taste of the Arts is an annual event sponsored by Bloomsburg University’s College of Liberal Arts. This event allows the university to share its creative side by displaying visual and performing arts for the town of Bloomsburg and the surrounding area.

          A Taste of the Arts takes place this Saturday, Feb. 27, from 2 to 5 p.m. in the Caldwell Consistory, 150 Market St., Bloomsburg. This event includes a theatre performance from Bloomsburg University’s theatre and creative writing students. There will be a staged 10-minute reading of The Nosemaker’s Apprentice by Nick Jones and Rachel Shukert, and is presented and directed by Professor David A. Miller.

          Other things you might enjoy include the dance performance by the BU Dance Minor program, a creative writing reading, which features members of the English Department reading their original work, or a performance by Bloomsburg University Acapella Group and Concert Choir or the Husky Singers and the Women’s Choral Ensemble.

          American Ninja Warrior competitor headlines leadership summit

          Hoan Do

          Hoan Do, a regional finalist for American Ninja Warrior and Verizon Wireless Motivator Award winner, will be featured at the 10th annual Husky Student Leadership Summit on Saturday, Feb. 27, as the keynote speaker, leading two workshops, participating in the Leadership Networking Luncheon and a hosting a book signing at the end of the day.

          Hoan will be delivering the keynote, “Leaders in Action,” at 9 a.m in the KUB Ballroom, followed by a session, “The Art of Connecting,” at 10:15 a.m. in McCormick Center 2303. In the afternoon, Hoan will present, “Succeeding in the Real World,” at 2:15 p.m. in McCormick Center 2303 and then participate in a free book signing in KUB Ballroom lobby at 3:30 p.m.

          Students must register online by Tuesday, Feb. 23, to attend any of his sessions.

          From an early age, Hoan was conscious of the sacrifices his parents had made in their escape to the United States during the Vietnam War – in pursuit of the American Dream. Feeling indebted to his parents for their courageous pursuit of a better life, Hoan vowed to ensure that one day, he would be able to take care of his parents. Hoan’s hard work took him to Malibu, Calif., where he attended Pepperdine University, fully engaging in the academic rigor and array of opportunities that the school offered.

          Nick Cannon brings Wild ‘N Out to campus

          Nick Cannon

          Bloomsburg University’s Student Concert Committee of CGA will host MTV star Nick Cannon for a special Wild ‘N Out comedy performance on Sunday, Feb. 28. Cannon has hosted seven successful seasons of Wild ‘N Out since 2005 on both MTV and MTV2.

          “We’re excited that we get to give the BU students two shows this semester,” says Erica Hooven, committee chairperson. “A comedy show is something that our committee has always wanted to do, and I think that the Wild ‘N Out tour will be something the students will really enjoy.”

          In past years the committee has brought big name artists such as Kendrick Lamar, Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds, Chris Rock, Paramore, and Big Sean, to perform on campus.

          “We have brought so many talented artists to Bloomsburg, but Wild ’N Out is especially exciting because we have the opportunity to bring the BU students a show they grew up watching on MTV for so many years,” says Kelsey Bowman, committee vice chairperson.

          MTV may even be filming the campus show for airing. Students can purchase up to two tickets, each $15, at the Haas Center for the Arts box office. General public tickets are $20. All seating is reserved.

          The Student Concert Committee will also announce this year’s spring concert performer for the first time after the conclusion of the Wild N’ Out show.

          Now THIS is an internship

          Jedediah Lemon

          Jedediah Lemon, a junior political science major, is working in the office of state House Majority Leader David Reed this spring as part of a 15-week internship sponsored by Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education through Bloomsburg University.

          Lemon, who is also pursuing a minor in psychology, plans on attending law school after graduation. He is one of 16 students participating in The Harrisburg Internship Semester (THIS) program, which provides students the opportunity to work in all areas of state government while earning a full semester’s worth of credits.

          “I saw the internship as the perfect opportunity to learn state government from the inside by being able to intern in some of the highest ranked offices within the Commonwealth,” says Lemon, adding he hopes one day to return working at this office, not as an intern but as a pivotal member of Pennsylvania politics or work aside his father as a lawyer.

          Students, alumni connect for Career Boot Camp

          Angela Hummel

          After two decades’ worth of classroom lessons, tests and teacher lectures, college students can lay claim they know the ins and outs of academics and the expectations that come with it. Now, living and working in the real world? Not so much.

          Angela Hummel, an alumna and vice president of human resources at Evangelical Community Hospital, recognizes that “education prepares students for what they need to learn on a test but doesn't fill in the blanks for what an employer might be looking for.”

          Hummel will be among the nearly 20 presenters at Bloomsburg University's first "Boot Camp" hosted by the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience this weekend at the Greenly Center. Student participants will spend three days attending numerous workshops, panel discussions and individual presentations focused on leadership, teamwork and professional development.

          Participants will also take part in a series of quick chats, resume review sessions and speed interviewing. Alumni, university staff and organizational partners will be among those helping to facilitate these offerings.

          "I hope some of the information I share will give them real world workplace examples, things that people do or shouldn't do, give areas to focus on to bridge that classroom to the workplace,” said Hummel, who will be presenting at two sessions — Advice for Young Professionals and Resolving Conflicts in the Workplace.

          New level of realistic art on display

          Shelby Shadwell

          Shelby Shadwell creates images so real that it is nearly impossible to believe that they were drawn with a pencil. Shadwell’s works are on display in Bloomsburg University’s Haas Gallery through Thursday, March 10. Admission to the gallery is free and open to the public.

          Shadwell is an associate professor in the art department at the University of Wyoming. Born in Springfield, Mo., he earned a Bachelor in Fine Arts from Washington University School of Fine Art in St. Louis, where he studied printmaking and drawing as a Kenneth E. Hudson Scholar. He accepted a full fellowship to attend Southern Illinois University Carbondale and went on to graduate with a Master in Fine Arts in printmaking and drawing.

          Shadwell exhibits across the nation and was the recipient of the first-place prize in the International Drawing Annual 9 from the Manifest Creative Research Gallery and Drawing Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he had a solo show in February 2013. He participated in two small group exhibitions, “Defining Territory: Contemporary Drawing” at the Parkland Art Gallery in Champaign, Ill., and “Shades: Contemporary Drawing” at the John A. Day Gallery at the University of South Dakota, Vermillion. Shadwell received first place for his work in the Texas National 2014 Exhibition at the Cole Art Center in Nacogdoches.

          Looking for ways to leave your mark at BU?

          CGA Elections

          Consider joining the Community Government Association, which provides an opportunity to make the most out of your college career by participating in decision-making that impacts the university, meeting a wide variety of people, and developing leadership and teamwork skills.

          "Being a member of the CGA over the past three years has honestly been one of my best decisions at Bloomsburg,” said Rebecca DeMuth, CGA vice president. “ I have met some of my best friends, really sharpened my professional skills in leading teams, networking with administers, making formal proposals, and I've been able to make an impact on the surrounding community through the Big Event.”

          DeMuth said being a member of the CGA has brought my leadership skills to the next level, and has allowed me to see all that Bloomsburg University truly has to offer.

          Students can run for Secretary, Treasurer, Vice President, and President. If elected, you will partake in decision-making regarding the Kehr Union Building, late night, the shuttle service, the university bookstore, and more!

          BU Players present ‘The Laramie Project’

          The Laramie Project

          Forever marked by the murder of one young man, residents of the town of Laramie, Wyo., recounted the night Matthew Shepard was left on a fence to die because of his sexual orientation. Their words formed the “The Laramie Project” by Moisés Kaufman.

          The Bloomsburg University Players will present the play Wednesday through Saturday, Feb. 24 to 27, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 28, at 3 p.m. in Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center St., Bloomsburg.

          On Oct. 8, 1998, 22-year-old Shepard was kidnapped, severely beaten, and left tied to a fence on the outskirts of Laramie. “The Laramie Project” is a chronicle depicting the life of the town a year after the murder.

          Kaufman and fellow members of the Tectonic Theater Project made six trips to Laramie over the year and a half following the kidnapping and death of Matthew Shepard, who was the victim of a hate crime. They conducted more than 200 interviews with the people of Laramie along with recording their own responses to create the theatrical collage, “The Laramie Project.”

          Hoping to open doors for ED conversation

          National Eating Disorder Awareness Week

          According to the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA), 20 million women and 10 million men in the United States suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some time in their life — anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or EDNOS.

          Tiffany Mulligan and Sammi Maloof, two Bloomsburg University sophomores, are bringing NEDA week to campus to showcase the uprising and show support for those in need of help.

          “I hope that NEDA week will raise much more support for those who are suffering and those affected by eating disorders in their lives,” Mulligan said. “And offer an environment to students where they can be more open about these issues without feeling judged.”

          National Eating Disorder Awareness Week

          • Monday, Feb 22 — Sock It To ED: Wear your craziest socks to kick ED to the curb! Create Your Own Flyer: Support positive media by making your own flyer in the KUB 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
          • Tuesday, Feb 23 — Team Up Against ED: Wear your favorite sports team gear to tackle ED to the ground! Fear Foods: Overcome your fears with us in the KUB 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
          • Wednesday, Feb 24 — Clash With ED: Wear mismatched clothes to clash with ED and beat it down! Be Body Positive: Spread positivity to Bloomsburg University
          • Thursday, Feb 25 — Movie Night: Unwind and join us in watching a feel-good movie in KUB Multi 345B 6 to 9 p.m.

          Both Mulligan and Maloof have been directly impacted with this illness, everyday recovering and staying positive they want the same for others. Also helping to organize NEDA Week on campus includes the Women’s Resource Center, WISE, Delta Phi Epsilon, and the Living and Learning Communities.

          Lessons learned from 50 jobs in 50 states

          Daniel Seddiqui, who held 50 jobs in 50 states, is making his way back to Pennsylvania for a presentation on the essential elements for success. The program, sponsored by the Ziegler Institute for Professional Development, will be presented Thursday, Feb. 25, at 7 p.m. in the Kehr Union Ballroom.

          The presentation, “Lessons Learned: 50 Jobs. 50 States,” is open to all students and the public free of charge. Seddiqui will hit the points of career success, taking risks, how to network, and other important basics for college graduates. He has spoken at over 300 universities over the past few years.

          Seddiqui received a degree in economics from the University of Southern California in 2005, but had trouble finding a job after graduation. He sent out his résumé, completed job applications and knocked on doors but wasn’t having any luck. Although he had more than 40 interviews, he didn’t receive an offer.

          He worked as a volunteer before an idea sparked. He decided to seek 50 jobs, one in each state. He spent the next year traveling this nation, accomplishing this goal and meeting thousands of Americans.

          The list of jobs ranges from corn farmer in Nebraska to cheese maker in Wisconsin. Through it all, his experiences taught him the essential elements for success – taking risks, being adaptable, building a network and having endurance – which all are part of the equation of perseverance. He is now a bestselling author, speaker and director of an exploration college program.

          Professional U is a co-sponsor for this program.

          Step out of American culture without leaving campus

          International Potluck

          Watch first hand a traditional Chinese Dragon Dance, taste and enjoy homemade dishes from a plethora of different cultures, learn how to play international games, and sit back and relax to the sounds of hand drumming. Sound like your ideal way to end your Thursday?

          Take a step out of American culture, explore and discover different traditions from 6 to 8 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose 345B with campus members of numerous cultures from across the globe, as well as fellow students who have studied abroad.

          To kick off the Potluck event, the Chinese Club will be performing the Chinese Dragon Dance, which is typically the grand hoorah of the Chinese New Year Parade. The student performers who are demonstrating the dance hold the dragon up by poles, lifting them up and down to make the Dragon appear to be dancing.

          Some of the many dishes that will be served and shared at the event, just to name a few, are of Turkish, Arabian and Spanish decent, made by fellow students, international students and faculty who specialize in the culture.

          Campus explores ‘The End of Poverty?’

          “The End of Poverty?” a thought-provoking documentary by award-winning filmmaker, Philippe Diaz, will be screened by Bloomsburg University’s Institute for Culture and Society as part of the Bloomsburg Explores Poverty symposium series. The film will be shown on Thursday, Feb. 25, at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, room 218. Admission is free and open to the public.

          Shown at more than 25 international film festivals since its release in 2009, “The End of Poverty?” connects today’s financial crisis with policies that have lasted since the beginning of colonialization. Today, global poverty has reached new levels, with 20 percent of the Earth’s population using 80 percent of its resources and consuming 30 percent more than the planet can regenerate.

          Filmed in the slums of Africa and the barrios of Latin America, the documentary features insights from Nobel prize winners in economics, Amartya Sen and Joseph Stiglitz; authors Susan George, Eric Toussaint, John Perkins and Chalmers Johnson; university professors William Easterly and Michael Watts; government ministers, such as Bolivia’s Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera; and the leaders of social movements in Brazil, Venezuela, Kenya and Tanzania.

          CNN talent headlines Sankofa Conference

          Bloomsburg University’s annual Sanfoka Conference got off to an energetic and inspirational start, highlighted by popular BET News and CNN personality Marc Lamont Hill’s moving keynote speech.

          Hill spoke to the conference’s theme “Celebrating the past while embracing the future,” using his personal journey as a college drop-out through graduate school to becoming one of the leading intellectual voices in the country.

          Hill, a Philadelphia native and Morehouse College distinguished professor, is the host of BET News and a political contributor for CNN. He is also the former host of the nationally syndicated television show Our World With Black Enterprise and the inaugural host of Huff Post Live, as well as a former political contributor to Fox News Channel.

          The daylong conference continued with a series of workshops and presentations, some of which led by BU faculty and returning alumni.

          ‘The Clothesline Muse’ comes to Carver Hall

          The Clothesline Muse

          “The Clothesline Muse,” recreating an American tradition, gives voice to untold stories on Saturday, Feb. 20, at 7:30 p.m. at the Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium in Carver Hall at Bloomsburg University as a part of the Celebrity Artist Series. “The Clothesline Muse” is a theatrical production conceived as dance and developed into an evening-length, multidiscipline theatrical piece by Kariamu Welsh, scholar of cultural studies and performance.

          Six-time Grammy-nominated jazz vocalist Nnenna Freelon lends her talents to this work. Through dance, music, spoken word and video, Freelon as “The Muse” and a cast of artists give voice to the untold stories of African-American washwomen and other domestic workers.

          The stories of these laborers, still relevant today, are part of the economic history of our country. Welsh’s choreography turns simple wash movements into poetic dance, celebrating the passion of traditional “women’s work.” Projections and still images provide a glimpse into the world created when people listen to one another.

          Celebrity Artist Series

          • Don Quixote” — The Moscow Festival Ballet, founded by Sergei Radchenko, legendary principal dancer of the Bolshoi Ballet, will perform the most enduring adaptation of “Don Quixote” by choreographer Marius Petipa to music by composer Ludwig Minkus. Friday, March 18, 8 p.m., Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall.
          • Koresh Dance Company — The dance troupe, with guest performers from local and regional dance studios, will perform works set to Middle Eastern and classical music, dipping into repertory vaults in celebration of the 25th anniversary in 2016. Saturday, April 23, 8 p.m., Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall.
          • Allison Miller: Boom-Tic-Boom — The percussionist from New York City is a drummer, composer and teacher who has been named a Rising Star Drummer and Top 20 Jazz Drummer in Downbeat Magazine’s Critics Poll. Wednesday, April 27, 7:30 p.m., Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

          From the TV courtroom to Mitrani Hall

          Judge Greg Mathis

          Nationally known for his advocacy campaigns and popular reality courtroom television show, Judge Greg Mathis will visit campus Tuesday, Feb. 16, as part of Bloomsburg University’s 23rd Annual Martin Luther King, Jr., Commemorative Celebration.

          Mathis will present, “Political Empowerment: Maintaining and Building Your Community,” at 7 p.m. in Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hal. His inspirational life story of a street youth who rose from jail to Judge has provided hope to millions who watch him on the award-winning television court show Judge Mathis each day.

          In addition, his weekly newspaper column brings social and political insight to readers throughout the country. Mathis’s visit is sponsored by the Multicultural Center and the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

          BU hosts forensics and security conference

          Bloomsburg University is home to one of the nation’s top digital forensics programs. Digital security experts from around the world, students and others gathered for the inaugural BloomCON Forensics and Security Conference this weekend in the KUB Ballroom.

          According to Philip Polstra, associate professor of mathematical and digital sciences, BloomCON gave high school and college students and other attendees a chance to learn from industry experts in addition to offering networking opportunities with sponsors seeking interns and recent graduates. More than 20 expert speakers, including seven members of BU’s digital forensics faculty, gave presentations at all levels.

          Conference admission covered 3D printed badges and other materials, workshops, competitions, a lock pick village, lunch and a networking party featuring Dual Core, an internationally known nerdcore hip-hop duo. BloomCON was hosted by the Bloomsburg University Digital Forensics Club, a hub of activity for BU’s 200 undergraduate digital forensics students.

          Putting the you in Professional U

          Professional U

          Today Bloomsburg University students have the opportunity to to meet with employers from Central Pennsylvania at the annual Center PA Education Consortium Job and Internship Fair. The fair will be held at the Radisson Hotel in Harrisburg from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Transportation is available through the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience with a $10 refundable deposit; to sign up go to room 201 Warren Student Service Center.

          “I do not currently have employment lined up for after graduation and saw this as an excellent opportunity to market myself to potential employers,” said Spencer Rives, a senior. “Many companies that I have either recently applied to or am in the process of applying to will be attending the conference,”

          Rives is one of many students who are attending the job fair today.

          “I am hoping to get positive leads out of this career fair. I am determined that at least one of the leads or contacts that I obtain from the career fair will lead to a job offer,” Rives said. “With the amount of recruiters that are going to be attending, I will have the ability to talk to a multitude of companies which in the long run will help me feel a little more comfortable talking to recruiters.” 

          Teach for America

          Join Teach for America representative Zan Walker, in their online event to learn about Teach for America’s mission and the national movement to end educational inequity Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. Hear about the corps and alumni experience and the opportunity to make a long-term social impact with full-time salary and benefits after graduation.

          More than 250 ways to find your niche

          One of the best parts of college is the opportunity to meet people. Pretty much everything you do involves meeting someone new or establishing friendships that may never would’ve happened if you weren’t involved in a particular activity, organization or class.

          Your next opportunity?

          This Friday, Feb. 12. Representatives from many of the more than 250 clubs and organizations at Bloomsburg University will be on-hand during an Activities Fair from 1 to 4:30 p.m. in the KUB Multipurpose 345A&B.

          “I’m looking for clubs and organizations that might help me decide which major to declare,” said Kristen Larosa, a freshman who’s approaching the fair as a possible career builder. “As a freshman, the options are a little overwhelming. I’m hoping to find one or two clubs that I can really commit time to and find something I enjoy doing.”

          Don't underestimate the power of connections

          "President of the National Communication Association Student Club (NCASC), community assistant, communication studies major, and intern are just a few titles that define my life at Bloomsburg. I have to attribute all of my leadership opportunities and involvement to my major. I am constantly networking, socializing, and working with various groups, organizations, and people on campus," — Kate Armstrong, communication studies major.

          Christian voices in the pluralist wild

          Eric Miller

          Eric Miller, assistant professor of communications studies will present "Christian Voices in the Pluralist Wild: Religious Participation in the Liberal Public Square" on Wednesday, Feb. 10, at 5 p.m. in Student Services Center 004, as part of the Institute for Culture and Society Faculty Lecture Series.

          In this timely lecture, Miller will examine ways Christian Right activists and candidates have positioned themselves as defenders of religious freedom in an America purportedly besieged by rampant secularism. Miller explores the complexities of this strategic "declension narrative," which he argues can be understood as a struggle against pluralism.

          Eric Miller's presentation is free and open to the public. Like all ICS events, it is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts.

          Carver Hall bell rings for faculty fellows

          Faculty Fellowships

          Victoria Geyfman, Ph.D., Mark Bauman, Ph.D., and Stephen Clickard, Ph.D. were recently designated as Faculty Fellows. Today, Wednesday, Feb. 17, the bell above Carver Hall rang to mark this milestone and celebrate the impact this announcement will have on the BU community. These faculty members were chosen to receive the inaugural fellowships because of their continued commitment to outstanding teaching along with a devotion to encouraging student success through career advisement and support of experiential learning activities.

          The faculty fellowships will have a lasting impact; not just on the faculty members who receive them, but on the entire university community. The immediate impact comes in the form of each recipient entering into a two-year term beginning July 1, 2016, which includes an annual stipend of $2,500 from the Bloomsburg University Foundation to enhance scholarship and create professional and applied learning opportunities for students.

          NSSLHA helps provide “Hope for Harper”

          Hope for Harper

          Bloomsburg University's NSSLHA Chapter wanted to kick off the new semester with a substantial donation to a local family in need.

          And it did just that with the help of Facebook, which led the pre-professional student organization for speech-language pathology and audiology majors to an inspirational 3-year-old girl.

          “Harper was born with numerous diagnoses (some relating to our undergraduate studies of speech-language pathology and audiology), and has had thirteen surgeries to date,” said Juliann Wallace, NSSLHA chapter president, SLP/audiology major. “When the family requested practical Make-A-Wish wishes, such as a handicap accessible shower or hardwood flooring for easier mobility in the home, they were denied. Harper is in need of comfort care, and NSSLHA wanted to help.”

          Wallace said the student organization built funds throughout 2015 by selling discount cards to the community, hosting dine-to-donates at local restaurants, and selling Gertrude Hawk chocolate to fellow students, faculty, and staff.

          After a unanimous decision of the NSSLHA Executive Board, according to Wallace, they were able to donate $3,000 to Harper and her family on the second day of the spring semester.

          “Harper and her family were shocked by our donation and shared their gratitude on Facebook,” Wallace said. “Numerous comments from friends, family, and even strangers expressed elation with Bloomsburg University’s generosity. Our campus organization is honored to be a part this institution, and we are proud to affect the community in a positive manner as students and future professionals.”

          Researcher discusses racial disproportionality

          Kent McIntosh

          Research shows that children from underrepresented minorities are exposed to more frequent and harsher disciplinary procedures than their white counterparts, similar to higher rates of arrests and incarceration for adults from racial minorities.

          Kent McIntosh, who has done extensive research in positive behavior support, school systems change and sustainability of evidence-based interventions, will discuss this racial and ethnic disproportionality in a free lecture sponsored by Bloomsburg University’s McDowell Institute of Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support on Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

          Associate professor at the University of Oregon’s College of Education and director of the Educational and Community Supports research unit, McIntosh will present a multiple component approach, based on five interrelated steps, in “How Can We Reduce Racial Disproportionality in School Discipline?”

          McIntosh’s research focuses on implementation and sustainability of school-based interventions, reducing discipline disparities, and integrated academic and behavior support. He is lead author of more than 50 publications and principal or co-investigator of research supported by more than $20 million in federal grant funding. In the past, he has worked as a school psychologist, teacher trainer and teacher in both general and special education.

          Empowerment specialist takes on racism

          Eraka Rouzorondu, empowerment specialist, will speak on “The Good News about Racism” Monday, Feb. 8, at 6 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Multicultural Center. This presentation, focuses on the history of racism in society, is open to the public free of charge. It is co-sponsored by Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and BU’s Multicultural Center.

          Rouzorondu is an educator, poet, producer, director, performance artist and author. As the executive director of Ascension Productions, she presents personal, cultural and spiritual workshops. She has spoken to national organizations, universities, and major corporations, as well as individual personal clients over the past 25 years.

          “The first step to solving a problem is gaining a clear understanding of what created it,” Rouzorondu said. “The ‘good news’ is that we know exactly how racism against African Americans got started and exactly how and why it is being perpetuated — that means we know exactly what to do about it.”

          Senior finds niche in volunteering

          Nazeer Curry BOG

          A Bloomsburg University senior who is active on campus and in the community shared his experiences with the State System of Higher Education’s Board of Governors during the January meeting at the Dixon Center, Harrisburg.

          Nazeer Curry, a Philadelphia native majoring in anthropology and business, said he found his niche when he stepped outside of his comfort zone to volunteer off campus.

          “Volunteering is an opportunity to meet people from all walks of life and have a positive impact on people, both on and off campus,” Curry said, adding that his future plans include working in the real estate field, starting a nonprofit agency and continuing to serve the Bloomsburg University community.

          Chinese New Year

          Chinese New Year

          Deans, faculty and staff are celebrating the Chinese New Year in the College of Business. Business students will celebrate the New Year (the Year of Monkey) around mid-day today on the second floor of Sutliff Hall.

          The new year, also known as the Spring Festival, is marked by the lunisolar Chinese calendar, so the date changes from year to year. The festivities usually start the day before the New Year and continue until the Lantern Festival, the 15th day of the new year. Each Chinese New Year is characterized by one of 12 animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac. This year it's the Year of the Monkey, the ninth animal in the cycle.

          People born in the Year of the Monkey are characterized as quick-witted, curious, innovative and mischievous, but it is also believed to be one of the most unlucky years in the Chinese calendar.

          Informal Fridays: Don’t suit up … just show up!

          Career Development Center

          With classes, assignments, organization meetings and even part-time work jamming up your calendar, how do you carve out time to focus on career stuff? Here’s a solution: Informal Fridays! THIS FRIDAY, Jan. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., staff at the Center for Professional Development and Career Experience (CPDCE), will be available in the atrium of the Student Services Center to talk with you about:

          • your professional development
          • how to conduct a job search
          • find an internship in your field
          • and lots more
          • You don’t need to schedule an appointment or suit up. Just show up! Whether you are a first-year student or ready to graduate this May, CPDCE staff of career coaches and professionals can assist you. And, there will be refreshments on hand! **Attend Informal Friday to enter your name in a drawing to win great prizes!** Informal Fridays will be happening throughout the semester. Keep your eyes open for communication about upcoming Informal Fridays.

            Byrum chosen for local chamber award

            Kristie Byrum

            The Business and Education Committee of the Greater Susquehanna Valley Chamber of Commerce recognizes excellence in education with awarding eight teachers, administrators and professors each school year with an Excellence in Education Award. This year Bloomsburg University’s very own Kristie Byrum, assistant professor of mass communications, received this award.

            “Byrum was nominated by a student and was selected for this award for her dedication to providing quality education in the valley,” said Jenny Wentz, director of membership and communications at Greater Susquehanna Valley Chamber of Commerce. “She is not only an inspiration to her students, but also to the community as a whole.”

            Byrum was judged upon seven different criteria including interactions between educators and business people, go above and beyond job role, community service, leadership, reduction of dropout rate, promoting educational and economic strengths and increasing in college and career readiness.

            Byrum was surprised by the Chamber and the awarded the Excellence in Education Award on Wednesday, Jan 26, on campus.

            Trash to Treasure raises more than $700

            Trash to Treasure

            Trash for Treasure is a well known community service many universities have participated in, including Bloomsburg University over winter break.

            “Trash for Treasure is a win for everyone,” says Heather Feldhaus, director of the Center for Community Research and Consulting. “BU gets help disposing of items we no longer need and community members get low cost computers and other items.”

            BU ended up raising more than $700, which will be donated to 15 nonprofit agencies across the country. Which also helps the United Way in tough budget times.

            “It’s both a great fundraiser and a wonderful environmental practice as it keeps serviceable items out of landfills,” says Feldhaus. “The student volunteers get to learn about the community and get a great workout moving all that stuff!”

            According to Feldhaus, it’s also a benefit to families who are able to obtain technology, such as computers, in their homes for kids to learn in such an uprising technology based world. BU will be hosting an even larger Trash to Treasure this May.

            Former AD to be honored with Lifetime Achievement Award

            Mary Gardner

            The Division 2 Athletics Directors Association (D2 ADA) has announced the recipient of the 2016 D2 ADA Lifetime Achievement Award – Mary Gardner, former director of athletics at Bloomsburg University. The Lifetime Achievement Award is given to athletics directors who have exemplified superior achievement during their career at the Division II level. Gardner retired in 2011 after 23 years leading the Huskies athletics program.

            "Mary was a pioneer in women's athletics and led Bloomsburg to unprecedented success in her 23 years at the helm of the Huskies," stated D2 ADA President Fran Reidy, director of athletics at Saint Leo University. "The D2 ADA looks forward to honoring her impressive accomplishments at the Convention in June."

            Gardner became one of the first female athletics directors in the country responsible for both the men's and women's athletics program when she was appointed to the post in 1988 after serving on an interim basis for six months. Prior to becoming athletics director, Gardner served as associate director of athletics and an assistant professor in the department of exercise science. Before beginning her career as an administrator, Gardner was head coach of the Bloomsburg women's swimming and diving program for 14 seasons, led the men's team for one season and coached field hockey from 1974-78.

            As athletics director, Gardener had oversight of Bloomsburg's $18 million athletics facilities renovations. Steph Pettit Stadium, composed of an all-turf surface and press box for soccer, field hockey and lacrosse, was part of the initial phase. The tennis complex was completed in 2008, followed by the Redman Stadium renovation in 2009. In addition, the Nelson Field House underwent a $13.4 million renovation in 2010.

            Voices of study abroad, foreign exchange

            Denmark Abroad

            Denmark has become quite the destination for Bloomsburg University students. Coincidently this spring, there are two students on campus who share the Danish experience … but in rather opposite ways. Natalie Roessner, a junior business management major, studied at Aarhus University this past fall. Meanwhile, Denmark native Jakob Hviid is studying abroad at BU this spring from Aarhus University.

            Roessner and Hviid both encourage anyone who is considering abroad to simply, “do it.” She said it’s not as expensive as people may think and going abroad has changed many of her views. She added, “The world isn’t Bloomsburg, it’s better.”

            According to Roessner and Hviid, one of the key differences between Bloomsburg and Aarhus is their proximity to cities and cost of travel. In Europe, students have more accessible opportunities to explore several cities in nearby countries. Traveling is also more affordable, according to Roessner and Hviid. During Roessner’s stay in Denmark, she had the chance to travel to Norway, Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Austria, all in one semester’s time.

            Another difference between Bloomsburg and Aarhus, according to Roessner and Hviid, is the way universities work and how students feel about their education. They said being a student in Denmark means you completely want to be there studying for your degree. In Denmark, students are typically more passionate about their studies. Teaching procedures and classes also have a few differences between universities, they say.

            Hviid said it’s, “more personal,” here at Bloomsburg. He added at Aarhus you have to, “take responsibility for your own learning,” and continued by explaining some Danes at Aarhus choose to not help students at all, but there are also some who are sweet and are willing to help. During her fall study abroad Roessner attended lectures of about 300 people, which then broke down into smaller classes called tutorials, which are similar to classes at Bloomsburg. She described how classes at Aarhus were two hours long, purposely started 15 minutes late, had breaks after 45 minutes, and were only held a few times a week.

            Hviid said one thing he quickly discovered about Bloomsburg was how being friendly isn’t violating someone’s personal space. According to Hviid, he likes how people get to know each other here and described people in Denmark as more reserved. He describes the Danish are more closed-off and would not have a conversation with someone who were to randomly approach them somewhere. Hviid claims that, “In Denmark you are aware of the world.” Additionally, “Americans get a better idea of the world when they study abroad.”

            A dream winter break experience

            Italy Study Abroad

            Husky Nation returns to campus this weekend, signaling the official end to winter break. For this senior mass communications major, her journey home will take a few extra days ... but for good reason.

            “Studying abroad was something I’d always looked forward to doing and have been researching since I arrived at BU, but receiving a Professional Experience Grant just really made it happen,” said Charlotte Papparella, when she learned she received a grant to help with expenses for a study abroad opportunity to Florence University of the Arts in Florence, Italy. Her decision to incorporate the study abroad experience into her education was due directly to the Professional Experience Grant she received from the College of Liberal Arts.

            “When I learned of the opportunity to apply for support for the trip to Italy, I was intrigued, because Italy was always one of the places I thought would be the most interesting to visit and learn about,” Charlotte said. “Plus this specific trip was short enough to allow me to take a course and fit it in to still graduate on time.”

            BUSTED holding auditions tonight

            BUSTED Auditions

            Ready for the stage? Good news, BUSTED is hosting auditions Monday, Jan. 25, for new cast members to join the musical comedy series.

            “We are one big family,” says Alison Craig, cast member. “We get thrown into romantic relationships and are still able to hang out together outside of BUSTED.”

            BUSTED rehearses two times a week and performs once a month. They focus on Broadway and radio music. BUSTED is more than just a club, it changes people in the best way.

            “I was very timid going into BUSTED, but it has taught me to think on my feet and become more outgoing,” Craig says. “Which helps with my Educations degree to be able to think fast and change a lesson play around if needed.”

            Edwin Lopez, cast member, added, “I’m able to really express myself and perform. I become more and more comfortable with the people around me.”

            Singers should be prepared to sing the Star Spangled Banner and any song from Broadway or from iTunes Charts. Registration opens at 7:30 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose A.

            CCM lends helping hand over winter break

            CCM Habitat for Humanity

            From tiling floors to building fences, a group of eight Bloomsburg University Catholic Campus Ministry students learned valuable skills this winter break while also helping others.

            The students, along with Rev. David Hereshko, CCM director, and Amy Yeagle, associate director, spent Jan. 3 through Jan. 9 volunteering with Habitat for Humanity’s Collegiate Challenge program in Hanover County, Va.

            While on their mission trip, BU’s Catholic Campus Ministry assisted Hanover County Habitat for Humanity with building one of the six homes they will complete this year. This two-bedroom, two-bathroom home is being built for a single mother and her two teenage children.

            “The best part of this trip was definitely building a part of the home and knowing that once it was finished someone will get to live in it,” said Erica Yerke, senior social work major.

            The group’s first task of the week was painting throughout the entire house, which is scheduled to be completed in February. The next job was laying the tile floors in the kitchen, bathrooms, and laundry room. Students took turns cutting tiles, spreading out thin cement, and spacing and laying tiles.

            Meanwhile, another group of students worked in the backyard, clearing out undergrowth, extending a chain link fence, and building a wooden fence. Building the wooden fence included digging holes for the fence posts, cementing the fence posts in, and attaching the boards of the fence.

            Researcher discusses racial disproportionality

            Kent McIntosh

            Research shows that children from underrepresented minorities are exposed to more frequent and harsher disciplinary procedures than their white counterparts, similar to higher rates of arrests and incarceration for adults from racial minorities.

            Kent McIntosh, who has done extensive research in positive behavior support, school systems change and sustainability of evidence-based interventions, will discuss this racial and ethnic disproportionality in a free lecture sponsored by Bloomsburg University’s McDowell Institute of Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support on Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 6 p.m. in Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium.

            Associate professor at the University of Oregon’s College of Education and director of the Educational and Community Supports research unit, McIntosh will present a multiple component approach, based on five interrelated steps, in “How Can We Reduce Racial Disproportionality in School Discipline?”

            McIntosh’s research focuses on implementation and sustainability of school-based interventions, reducing discipline disparities, and integrated academic and behavior support. He is lead author of more than 50 publications and principal or co-investigator of research supported by more than $20 million in federal grant funding. In the past, he has worked as a school psychologist, teacher trainer and teacher in both general and special education.

            Alumna is wellness executive director

            Janet Rarig

            A BU alumna and clinical psychologist with more than 20 years of experience delivering care and implementing programs is BU’s new executive director of wellness. In this new position, Bloomsburg native Janet Rarig ’80 oversees the Student Health Center, Center for Counseling and Human Development and the Drug, Alcohol and Wellness Network, known as DAWN.

            Rarig, who previously worked in BU’s Counseling Center, transitioned into program development, where she was involved in operations and administration of clinical services and community planning. She has extensive experience in designing and promoting service improvements and integration, most recently with the Geisinger Health System. Rarig earned a doctoral degree with a specialized focus on behavioral medicine and systems thinking from the University of Denver, Colorado.

            Survey seeks opinions of BU freshmen, seniors

            Each member of Bloomsburg University’s first-year and senior classes is invited to share opinions about his or her experiences at BU by completing the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). According to Sheila Dove Jones, assistant vice president for planning and assessment, answers to the online survey will reveal students’ views on the quality of their education and their level of involvement in activities outside of the classroom. Results will be used to improve the undergraduate experience and as a baseline measurement for BU’s general education requirements.

            Jones said several email messages containing a link to the survey will be sent to BU’s freshmen and seniors in February and March. She encourages students to respond by April 15.

            In appreciation for their participation, students who complete the survey by April 15 will be entered automatically into a random drawing to win one of two Amazon gift cards valued at $150, one of four Amazon gift cards valued at $100, one of two Amazon gift cards valued at $50 or one of 43 Bloomsburg University insignia prizes worth $5 to $30. A student’s chances of winning depends on how many students complete the survey; the last time this survey was administered about 985 students responded. Based on this estimate, the odds of winning are 1 in 19. The Web version of the survey is available at nssesurvey.org.

            “All student responses are valuable for helping us compare the experiences they report with those of students at hundreds of other colleges and universities,” Jones said. “The results will also indicate important trends in undergraduate education. More voices will make the results more valid.”

            Approximately 4,000 BU students have been invited to participate. A total of 541 U.S. colleges and universities and 315,000 first-year students and seniors participated in the 2015 survey.

            New home for BUPD

            BU Police Department Location

            The Bloomsburg University Police Department’s new headquarters at the rear of Andruss Library will be in full operation as of Wednesday, Jan. 13, at 7 a.m.
            Construction of the L-shaped addition, which also houses BU’s telecommunications office, began last spring. BUPD moved from the former University Store building, where demolition is expected to begin later this month to make room for a seven-story residence hall set to open in August 2017. The University Store is temporarily located in Kehr Union, second floor.

            Other operations relocated by the demolition of the University Store building and their new locations are:

            • Mailroom, Elwell Residence Hall
            • Black Box Theatre, Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium